20/2.8 for portraits?

Discussion in 'Lens Lust' started by Uncle Frank, May 29, 2007.

  1. Sure, why not, as long as you don't mind images that look like they came out of an old photobooth.

    I hate taking portraits with the timer, so I used my wired remote for these shots of Nancy and me. The cord on it is pretty short, so I used my widest lens... the 20/28D. Sure, there's a little distortion, but we had some good giggles that made up for it :biggrin:.

    I fired a single flash into an umbrella at frame left as the main, balanced it with the fill light coming through a window from frame right. The shooting data for both images was d200 1/125s f/4.0 at 20.0mm iso400.


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    Last edited by a moderator: May 29, 2007
  2. amazing how you're using lighting to make it look like you're not using lighting...

    Great shots Frank. Always enjoy your work.
  3. Very nice. I would not have thought a wide lens appropriate for portrait but you made it work. The lighting is excellent. Now about that shirt...
  4. 20/2.8 for portraits? Yes!

    It's amazing how you manage to do always good work with every tool you use!
    I never thought about the 20 doing portraiture but it's great! Nice light as well btw.
  5. Thanks for letting me know you enjoyed the snaps, folks. I tried to keep the session fun, and avoided a "studio" look by only using a single flash. I was also shameless about using photoshop to improve our appearance... well, mine anyway. Nancy didn't need any help :biggrin:.
  6. Thanks, Jimmy! But read this short tutorial from The Strobist, and you'll see how easy it is to do.


    Oops, I forgot... there's a second part :rolleyes:.


    And here's the best advice in the tutorial:

  7. How close were you sitting to the camera? :wink: I like the second one the best where you both don't look so serious :smile:
  8. Probably 3 feet. Couldn't have been much further, because the remote cord is only 2.6 feet long.

    There's definitely some perspective distortion (hint: Nany has a proper Irish button nose), but for this kind of fun stuff, who cares?
  9. You both look nice (one more than the other :biggrin:), it was fun for both you and us, who cares about perspective distortion anyway?
    Great shots Frank!
  10. Nuteshack

    Nuteshack Guest

    great shots, Frank ...excellent lighting and lovely models...;-)
    ...btw, i think too much is made of perspective distortion anyway,,fact, if pushed some it can be a lot of fun...thanks for sharing ..;-))
  11. Nice, natural looking results, Frank! Where is the distortion? Hardly noticeable... I like the more relaxed second pose much better, and of course one of the two models does indeed look better... :wink:

    Now, you can do the same with your D70 and the little wireless remote, which is good for a lot more than 2.6 ft, and you can use pretty much any lens, including the 85/1.4! :tongue:
  12. Uncle Frank,

    I love the way you are using the light here. The flash lights just enough to complement the window light. Beautiful! Did you choose this location to shoot by metering or just the good old "looks like this oughta work" formula?

    And the 20 works just fine. Isn't it surprising how preconceptions can be shattered by someone who simply goes out and does what lots of folks thought couldn't be accomplished... portraits with a 20! Yes! Well done!

    And I know you didn't shoot with the idea of proving anything especially, but it sure is fun to test the limits!

    You two are a lovely couple. The expressions on your faces in the first shot just shout "We are in love." It is a treat to see that. Frankly, I'm not surprised. Those who have good people skills often have tender hearts. And whether you wanted it to or not, tenderness is what that first image is all about.

    The second is about enjoying each other and what you were doing. You both have wonderful smiles... lips and eyes. Your whole soul smiles. Very nice.

    I like your new avatar. Did the home team lose that day?

    Always a delight to see your work, especially as you're learning this lighting thing.

    I'm happy to say that I have seen a couple of hummingbirds at my feeder.
    Sugar water, as recommended. I'm hoping to catch a shot. If I can, I'll post it.

    God bless.
  13. Many thanks for the kind comments, Jordan, Nute, and Philippe!

    Reverend Doug, you have a lovely way of expressing yourself... not surprising considering your profession. But every time I spot a post from you, I know I'm in for a treat. Thanks for taking the time.
  14. Very nice shot of you two Frank. I have never had the courage to shoot portraits with my 20mm, it sure looks pretty good here.
    I like the balance you achieved between the natural light and the umbrella.
    Maybe narrowing the angle (less perpendicular) you had with the natural light source would have brightened the dark side of your face somewhat, but that is nitpicking.
    Overall very nice, enhanced even more by the two of you obviously having a good time.
  15. Cope


    Apr 5, 2007
    Houston, Texas

    Yoyu have a very lovely and photogenic wife. How much PP did it take to get you to look presentable?:wink:

    I am not too far behind you on the CLS path. I bought "The Speed of Light" from a member here, and cannot get CLS out of my mind.
  16. Thanks, Frits! Check out my response (#6) to Jimmy for a link to a Strobist tutorial on how to do that.

    Yes, because in this setup, Nancy is shading the fill light that should be falling on my face. But we can't change the angle because of the tight geometry of the room, so I'd need another strobe for fill to fix it.