Share 2020 Octoberfest - Bucket

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It's been quite a long time since I last shot at Zürich main station. To bad I didn't have time to stay any longer today, but well - here are 2 more shots. These being more static, of patterns. I've chosen the more dynamic one for my Day 20 entry in the thread.


Soon to move

OF2020-b-20a.JPG
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Walk on the left. To the top of the frame. Which is downwards.

OF2020-b-20b.JPG
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It's been quite a long time since I last shot at Zürich main station. To bad I didn't have time to stay any longer today, but well - here are 2 more shots. These being more static, of patterns. I've chosen the more dynamic one for my Day 20 entry in the thread.


Soon to move

View attachment 1672406


Walk on the left. To the top of the frame. Which is downwards.

View attachment 1672407
Both are great Roland. I love the pattern in the first one. Will have to check out your daily post.
 
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Day 20 bucket for Temple New Hampshire...

Birchwood Inn
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From Wikipedia...
"[Its main building is a 2½ story, roughly rectangular, brick and wood frame structure. The front half of the building, its five-bay width and about half of each side wall, are faced in brick, while the rear of the block is framed in wood and sheathed in clapboards. A single-story porch extends across the front and wraps around the sides, supported by chamfered square columns. Walls on some of its interior spaces were painted by muralist Rufus Porter, and it retains a well-preserved period taproom. This block is connected by an ell to a barn-like structure (built c. 1847-48), which was used for stabling horses on the ground level and has a large open hall above.

The early construction history of the building is not known. Based on its style, the inn was built during the Federal period (roughly 1790-1830), and has served as a center of hospitality ever since. The building has historically been used for town meetings and other civic and social events, serving as the town post office and general store. The expansion in 1847-48 made it possible to expand the establishment's entertainment offerings, with a sprung wooden floor in the second-floor ballroom. The front porch was added in 1892, when it was purchased by new owners and converted into a boarding house catering to tourists. Its amenities were further updated in the 1930s to include inside plumbing and electricity."

It is on the National Registry of Historic places and still used as a restaurant and inn.


Congregational Church of Temple
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Located right next to the town hall. I'm not sure of the date of this church, although it is quite old.
 
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I had thought I would capture two images, one long exposure to smooth water and another exposed for the sky, and combine them in post. As it happens, neither image was strong enough warrant the time and energy. I used the in between 20 second exposure converted to B&W in my thread. Here are the two that I was going to composite:
Octoberfest_20201020_15_530714_20C_5913.jpg
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Octoberfest_20201020_15_550986_20C_5915.jpg
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I open that door...

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Outovafridge selfie

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Here's one from the dock that didn't make the cut.
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Day 22 bucket for Mont Vernon...

Congregational Church
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Across from the Town Hall, this was a really cool, old building.

Lamson Farm
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From Wikipedia...
"Founded in the 1770s and operated as a farm until 1975, it is one of the few surviving intact 19th-century farm properties in the community. Its land, over 300 acres (120 ha) in size, is now town-owned conservation and farmland. The property has trails open to the public, and an annual celebration of Lamson Farm Day is held here every September.
...
The built infrastructure of the farm consists of eleven buildings, located along either side of Lamson Road. The main house is on the east side, consisting of a multi-section structure whose core is a Cape style 1-1/2 story timber frame house built about 1770. Most of the outbuildings date to the early 20th century; the main cow barn, made by combining two older structures, has at least one section dating to the early 19th century. Located northeast of the farmstead are the foundational remains of a second farm property, which was purchased by the Lamsons in the early 20th century. Located near the junction of Lamson and Cross Streets is a stone foundation which once held a small district schoolhouse."
 
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Three attempts at images today. Two are here, the best one (by the tiniest of margins) is in my main thread.

First, an image inspired by @jbailey930:
22b. HUD
Octoberfest_20201022_09_125647_20C_5926.jpg
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22c. Beer
Octoberfest_20201022_17_240657_20C_5929.jpg
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Day 23 Bucket...

Wilton Public and Gregg Free Library
2020_23__DSC7577.jpg
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From Wikipedia...
"It is a 2-1/2 story masonry structure, built out of red brick with limestone trim. It is covered by a hip roof whose eave is studded with heavy modillion blocks. The main facade is three bays wide, with a projecting center bay topped by a fully pedimented gable and fronted by four large Corinthian columns. The outer bays house windows set in rounded-arch openings, with the openings surrounded by a keystoned arch, side pilasters, and a limestone balustrade below. The main entrance is in the center bay, flanked by smaller columns set in antis which rise to an entablature. Above this entablature is a large half-round transom with a keystoned arch.

David Almus Gregg was a native of Wilton who owned a successful building parts business in Nashua, manufacturing doors, window blinds, and window sashes. Gregg was significantly involved in the design and construction of the building, providing the highest quality building materials and contractors to the project, which was estimated to cost $100,000 when completed in 1907. He then followed up the building construction with an endowment for its care, given in 1912."

The Souhegan River runs right through the town...
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Day 23 Bucket Weare New Hampshire

Stone Memorial Building
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This was erected in 1896 as a memorial and is currently used by the historical society.

Weare Town Hall
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From Wikipedia...
"It is a 2½-story frame structure, covered by a gabled roof and finished in wooden clapboards. The main facade is fairly plain, with a double-door entrance at the center, and three sash windows on the second level. A two-stage tower rises above the facade, with pinnacles at the corners of each stage, and a louvered belfry in the second stage. The belfry houses a bell manufactured in 1837 by George Holbook of East Medway (now Millis), Massachusetts; Holbrook had received his training in the bell foundry of Paul Revere.

The hall was built in 1837 to serve both as a town meeting space and a place for the local Universalist congregation to meet. The interior was originally arranged so that town meetings were held on the first floor and church services on the second. The upstairs was adapted for use as a high school in 1919, and has also been home to local fraternal organizations. The building continues to be used for town facilities, and the meeting space is rented out for private social functions in addition to its civic uses"

The town had several interesting historical items. From Wikipedia...
"It was granted to veterans of the Canadian wars in 1735 by Governor Jonathan Belcher, who named it Beverly-Canada after their hometown, Beverly, Massachusetts. But the charter was ruled invalid because of a prior claim by the Masonian proprietors, who granted six square miles as Hale's Town to Ichabod Robie in 1749.[2] It was also known as Robie's Town or Weare's Town before being incorporated by Governor Benning Wentworthin 1764 as Weare, after Meshech Weare, who served as the town's first clerk and later went on to become New Hampshire's first governor.

In 1834, Moses Cartland founded Clinton Grove Academy, the first Quaker seminary in the state. A cousin of John Greenleaf Whittier, Cartland named the village where the school was located Clinton Grove, in honor of Dewitt Clinton, chief sponsor of the Erie Canal. The original academy served as a private high school. The complex, which included a classroom building, boarding house, barn and sheds, burned in 1872. Classes were then held in the Quaker meetinghouse across the common until 1874, when a new building was completed. It would serve as the Weare school district from 1877 to 1938.

On September 21, 1938, following several days of heavy rain, the New England Hurricane of 1938 passed through the center of New England. The additional rains from the storm caused the Deering Reservoir dam to breach, releasing a wall of water that rushed down to the Weare Reservoir dam. Although the dam held, the flash flood broke through the land at the side of the dam, releasing millions of gallons of reservoir water. The raging river, completely out of control, washed away everything in its path, leaving parts of Weare devastated. Many active mills were destroyed in the disaster.

In response to the disaster and seasonal flooding, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers built the 2,000-foot (610 m) long Everett Dam, as part of the Hopkinton-Everett Flood Control Project, which had been authorized by Congress to prevent a recurrence of the devastating floods. The overall project was completed in 1963 at a total cost of $21,400,000. The dam required the village of East Weare to be permanently abandoned, and formed Everett Lake.

In 2005, the town was proposed as the site of the Lost Liberty Hotel, a farmhouse owned at the time by U.S. Supreme CourtAssociate Justice David Souter. The effort to seize Souter's property for the project, in retaliation for a June 2005 court ruling he supported concerning eminent domain, received international media coverage. However, at the February 4, 2006, deliberative session of the town meeting, a warrant article that would have empowered town officials to take the property was amended by residents in a way that made the March 14, 2006, ballot measure moot."
 
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Some historical buildings, like Weare's town hall, were so important that they would build huge structures to protect the buildings...
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:)
:LOL:
 
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Oh dear, look at my forehead... - that one MUST have gone in. Fear helps the ball disappearing :)

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Day 24 Bucket...

For Epping (the replacement for "E"), there is...

Ben Franklin Prescott House
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From Wikipedia...
"It is a 2-1/2 story wood frame structure, covered by a bellcast mansard roof with flared eaves, and sheathed in wooden clapboards. It has paneled cornerboards, paired brackets in the eaves, and a richly detailed front portico. A 1-1/2 story ell extends to the rear of the main block. A period carriage barn is located across Prescott Street; although it has been converted to residential use, it retains Second Empire features similar to those of the house.

The house was built in 1875 for Benjamin Franklin Prescott, who was then serving in his second term as New Hampshire's Secretary of State. In 1877 he was elected to the first of two consecutive one-year terms as Governor of New Hampshire. Prescott had risen to prominence in the state as the publisher of a leading antislavery newspaper, and he was a noted local historian, serving as vice-president of the state historical society, and as a fellow of the Royal Historical Society of London. His house was sold out of the family in 1903."


Epping Town Hall
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From Wikipedia about the town of Epping...
"Epping was originally part of Exeter, one of the four original New Hampshire townships. Starting in 1710, Exeter awarded free wood lots in the area to encourage settlement. In 1741, Epping was granted a charter and incorporated as a town. It was the last New Hampshire town chartered by Governor Jonathan Belcher before the Province of New Hampshire was granted a governor who did not also govern the neighboring Province of Massachusetts Bay. Epping was named for Epping in England.[2]

Through the 1800s, farming was a principal occupation in Epping. The town also had substantial reserves of clay, long used by local residents to make bricks, and in 1840, the first commercial brickyard was established in Epping.

...
Epping was once an important junction of the Worcester, Nashua & Rochester Railroad and the Portsmouth & Concord Railroad, later both part of the Boston & Maine Railroad. The north-south WN&R line through town was abandoned in 1932, with a short segment remaining in place south to Fremont to serve a lumber yard and barrel manufacturer located there. This left the east-west Portsmouth Branch between Manchester and Portsmouth as Epping's only access to the national rail network.

Passenger service on the Portsmouth Branch ceased in 1954, although mixed-train service continued until 1960. A regular freight running from Concord to Portsmouth and return served Epping until 1972, after which a local freight out of Concord served the branch as needed, usually once or twice a week and often not passing beyond Epping where the last concentration of customers was located. Customers in Epping at this time included the Merrimack Farmers Exchange and the W.S. Goodrich brickyard. Occasional hi-and-wide freight movements operated over the Portsmouth Branch in the 1970s due to the lack of close clearance points, with several carrying materials destined to the under-construction Seabrook Station Nuclear Power Plant. Declining track conditions led to the B&M embargoing the branch in December 1979, with the last trains operating to Epping earlier that year and the final train to Raymond following in July 1980 despite the embargo. The Boston & Maine abandoned the track from East Manchester to Newfields in 1982, and the rail was removed in Epping between 1983 and 1985. The railroad beds are now the Rockingham Recreational Trail."



For Exeter (the closest thing I could find for "X"), there is...

Samuel Tenney House
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From wikipedia...
"This mansion was built circa 1800 as the primary residence of Samuel Tenney, a noted scholar, scientist, physician, American Revolutionary War surgeon, patriot, judge, and member of Congress, and his wife Tabitha Gilman Tenney, the noted early American author.

The master carpenter for the house was Ebenezer Clifford working with Bradbury Johnson. At the time, Clifford lived in the Gilman Garrison House, now owned by Historic New England. They also built the First Church, Exeter; the second Phillips Exeter Academymain building; and the Atkinson Academy building.

Mrs. Tenney died in 1837, and the house was later occupied by Tristram Shaw, who was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, representing New Hampshire from 1830 until his death in 1843."
 
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At the very beginning of October, I showed the picture of our garden, where our neighbor had helped us by removing all the hedgerow that had suffered or died even here and there.

This week, the new plants arrived and he pkantes them for us. And today, enjoying a wonderful sunny autumn day, we finished the project doing a bit of detail work, cleaning up and raking leaves. Oh well - a garden is never 'finished', of course ;)

Here are a few pictures showing the new hedge and now much more open space between our properties.


View towards the street - we gained a small path there, the old hedge used to be so thick it covered that space.

If you look carefully, you can see neighbor's smiley wood in the stack next to his hut.

OF2020-b-24a.jpg
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Overview of the no man's land from an angle
I really like the colors, so late in the year.

OF2020-b-24b.JPG
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To loosen up, we decided not to replace the hedge behind his wood shelter. Gives us more space around the playing sand, and helps the red japanese maple tree, I hope, building a closed, round crown.

OF2020-b-24c.jpg
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And further, you can never have enough decoration - Our neighbor loves artful wood stacks. So he placed yet another beauty in the line of hedge plants.

OF2020-b-24d.jpg
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We now have 2 of these, and we really like them. On his side, he gained quite some light and room for a little fruit garden (2x apple and 1 pear planted already). And it looks so lovely with the 3 deco-wood-stack visible from over there, ciunting the smiley one as well.
 
Joined
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At the very beginning of October, I showed the picture of our garden, where our neighbor had helped us by removing all the hedgerow that had suffered or died even here and there.

This week, the new plants arrived and he pkantes them for us. And today, enjoying a wonderful sunny autumn day, we finished the project doing a bit of detail work, cleaning up and raking leaves. Oh well - a garden is never 'finished', of course ;)

Here are a few pictures showing the new hedge and now much more open space between our properties.


View towards the street - we gained a small path there, the old hedge used to be so thick it covered that space.

If you look carefully, you can see neighbor's smiley wood in the stack next to his hut.

View attachment 1672730


Overview of the no man's land from an angle
I really like the colors, so late in the year.

View attachment 1672728


To loosen up, we decided not to replace the hedge behind his wood shelter. Gives us more space around the playing sand, and helps the red japanese maple tree, I hope, building a closed, round crown.

View attachment 1672729


And further, you can never have enough decoration - Our neighbor loves artful wood stacks. So he placed yet another beauty in the line of hedge plants.

View attachment 1672731

We now have 2 of these, and we really like them. On his side, he gained quite some light and room for a little fruit garden (2x apple and 1 pear planted already). And it looks so lovely with the 3 deco-wood-stack visible from over there, ciunting the smiley one as well.
Very nice set and interesting to see how you made out with the project.
 
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These photographers had two things I really could have used today: telephotos lenses and rain gear.
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