Share 2020 Octoberfest - Bucket

kilofoxtrott

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Klaus
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Like Phil said: Great collection of buildings and very well photographed.

Kind regards
Klaus
 
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Aug 22, 2009
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Day 28 bucket: Derry New Hampshire

Lots of rain today, so I went to nearby Derry, and only stopped at two places. One was Robert Frost (poet) Farmhouse, which is in my main thread. Here is more of a frontal view of the house, which is a bit better, but had less of a view of the side yard and attached buildings. Could have gone either way with these shots.

Robert Frost Farmhouse (alternate view)
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I Also visited...
Adams Memorial Building
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From Wikipedia...
"It is a two-story masonry structure set on a raised basement, built out of brick with granite and wooden trim. Stone beltcourses separate the first and second floors, and the second floor and the elaborate roof cornice. The main facade is three bays wide, articulated by brick pilasters with stone capitals. The main entrance is in the center bay, recessed in a round arch framed by a projecting cornice supported by clustered columns. Upper level windows are set in large round-arch openings. On the left side, facing Maple Street, is a single-story single-bay round projecting section.

The building was designed by Lawrence, Massachusetts, architect George G. Adams, and completed in 1904. It originally housed a variety of municipal offices and the local library. Local events are occasionally held in the theater ("opera house") of the building, located on the upper level. The building is an unusually elaborate Colonial Revival structure for what was at the time a fairly small town (population c. 3,600 in 1920). It was twice damaged by fire (1914 and 1927), necessitating rebuilding of portions of its interior."
 
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NH, USA
Day 29 bucket: Manchester Part 1 of 3...

General John Stark House
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From Wikipedia...
"The house, a single-story Cape style farmhouse, was built in 1736 by Archibald Stark. Stark's son John, a hero of the American Revolutionary War, lived in this house from 1736 to 1765; it is where he brought his new bride Molly, and where two of their children were born."


Frank Pierce Carpenter House
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From Wikipedia...
"The house is roughly square in shape, with a three-story turret at its southeast corner and a projecting window bay at its southwest corner. A 2-1/2 story ell which originally housed service facilities projects to the west. The main (eastern) facade is three bays wide: the turret occupies the left bay, and the main entrance the center. The entry is sheltered by a single-story porch supported by clustered Tuscan columns (replacements c. 1970 for originals styled like those on the building's porte-cochere). The interior is lavishly decorated with period woodwork and imported marble.

The house was built in 1891 for Frank Carpenter, then the president of the Amoskeag Paper Company, and a major city benefactor. It was probably designed by Edgar A. P. Newcomb, who Carpenter had hired to design the city's Carpenter Memorial Library. The multi-acre estate that Carpenter amassed around the house was sold off in portions after his death in 1938, and the house was given a temporary lease of the property during World War II. This lease was made effectively permanent after the war, and the property was formally transferred to the Red Cross in 1993 by Carpenter's heirs, subject to preservation easements."


Ash Street School
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From Wikipedia...
"The school building is a French style Second Empire three story brick building. Its windows are tall and narrow with rounded tops, and are slightly recessed from the facade in a square niche; the window niches on the second floor have a further decorative brickwork border on top. The building's most prominent feature is its clock tower, which rises four stories, and is topped by a mansard roof.

Building of the 13,800-square-foot (1,280 m2) schoolhouse took place in 1873 and 1874. It was finally completed and dedicated in 1874. The Amoskeag Company paid only .04 cents per square foot for the empty lot back in 1869.

A model of the building won a gold medal for its innovative design at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876. The shape of the building was designed to be that of a Greek cross, with arms 88 feet (27 m) long and 32 feet (9.8 m) wide. Each arm is aligned on the property so that each end faces one of the principal directions. All original classrooms (eight in total) had windows on three sides to assist in allowing light and adequate ventilation. The building was the first in the country with this design style.

The clock tower is 112 feet (34 m) high. The bell alone within the clock tower weighs 2,100 pounds (950 kg)."

Of personal note: This is across the street from the first apartment my wife and I lived at, after getting married and moving to New Hampshire.
 
Joined
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Day 29 bucket: Manchester Part 2 of 3...

Roger Sullivan House
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From Wikipedia...
"It is a 2-1/2 story wood frame structure, with asymmetrical massing typical of the Queen Anne style. It is covered by a hip roof and finished in wooden clapboards and shingles. It is an exuberant expression of Queen Anne design, with varied gables, porches, chimneys, and bays, and a three-story turret capped with a conical roof. A period carriage house stands to the southwest of the house.

The house was designed by local architect William M. Butterfield, and built in 1892 for Roger G. Sullivan on land he purchased in 1890 from the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. Sullivan, a native of Bradford, New Hampshire, was manufacturer of one of the most widely distributed brands of ten-cent cigars, employing as many as 800 workers in a factory on West Central Street. Butterfield was one of the city's most prolific architects of the period, producing designs for all types of buildings and in many different styles. The house's builder, Wilberforce Ireland, was one of Manchester's leading contractors of the period. The house remained in the Sullivan family until 1957."


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Side view, so you can see the amazing details on this house - one of my favorites.

Thomas Russell Hubbard House
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From Wikipedia...
"It is a 2½-story wood frame structure, with a complex roofline. It is notable for its four-story tower, with quoined corners and an open fourth level with round arch windows. It has the deep, bracketed eaves typical of the Italianate style, and irregular massing with many projecting sections. The interior of the house is a showcase of its original owner's lumber products, with high quality woodwork using a wide variety of woods, and fine marble fireplace surrounds.

The house was built in 1867 on an entire city block of land purchased by Thomas Russell Hubbard in 1864 from the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. Hubbard grew up on a farm, and was a self-made businessman producing wooden window sashes, doors, and window blinds, as well as operating a local lumber yard. When built, the house lot afforded fine views to west, over the Merrimack River to the nearby hills. A later owner of the house was David B. Varney, who served as mayor of Manchester in the 1890s. The house originally had a period carriage house, but that was demolished when the property was subdivided for further development."
 
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Aug 22, 2009
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Day 29 bucket: Manchester Part 3 of 3...

Saint Mary's Bank Credit Union
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From historical marker...
"The first credit union in the U.S. was founded here in 1908, the inspiration of Monsignor Pierre Hevey, the pastor of Sainte-Marie Parish. Monsignor Hevey sought to improve the economic stability and independence of the French-speaking mill workers by giving them a safe and welcoming place to save and borrow money. Until 1913 the credit union was located here in the home of attorney Joseph Boivin, its first president and manager. Initially open kist evenings and holidays, the credit union grew to become one of the state's most stable financial institutions."

Personal note: with a large French Canadian population in Manchester, and especially on the West side, the credit union had bilingual tellers, when we moved here in the 80's and probably still does.


Saint Marie Romain Catholic Church
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The church, rectory, child care, and a small school are close to the credit union. This is one of the real ornate churches in the area.
 
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Apr 30, 2005
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Hong Kong
Back alley behind the pub in my D30 entry

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Joined
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441
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North Springfield VA
Real Name
Bill Walderman
Day 29 bucket: Manchester Part 3 of 3...

Saint Mary's Bank Credit Union
View attachment 1673047
From historical marker...

Personal note: with a large French Canadian population in Manchester, and especially on the West side, the credit union had bilingual tellers, when we moved here in the 80's and probably still does.


Saint Marie Romain Catholic Church
View attachment 1673048
View attachment 1673049
The church, rectory, child care, and a small school are close to the credit union. This is one of the real ornate churches in the area.
My recollection from the 1960s is that French was ubiquitous in Manchester.
 
Joined
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Messages
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My recollection from the 1960s is that French was ubiquitous in Manchester.
When I got here in the 80's, I would hear some people speaking French at some of the grocery stores, and occasionally when I was at St. Mary's Bank. I haven't heard people speaking French in many years, but may still be some people using it on the West side of the city, which was heavily French-Canadian. I suspect that ethnic concentration has dissolved over the years.
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2019
Messages
441
Location
North Springfield VA
Real Name
Bill Walderman
When I got here in the 80's, I would hear some people speaking French at some of the grocery stores, and occasionally when I was at St. Mary's Bank. I haven't heard people speaking French in many years, but may still be some people using it on the West side of the city, which was heavily French-Canadian. I suspect that ethnic concentration has dissolved over the years.
Day 29 bucket: Manchester Part 3 of 3...

Saint Mary's Bank Credit Union
View attachment 1673047
From historical marker...
"The first credit union in the U.S. was founded here in 1908, the inspiration of Monsignor Pierre Hevey, the pastor of Sainte-Marie Parish. Monsignor Hevey sought to improve the economic stability and independence of the French-speaking mill workers by giving them a safe and welcoming place to save and borrow money. Until 1913 the credit union was located here in the home of attorney Joseph Boivin, its first president and manager. Initially open kist evenings and holidays, the credit union grew to become one of the state's most stable financial institutions."

Personal note: with a large French Canadian population in Manchester, and especially on the West side, the credit union had bilingual tellers, when we moved here in the 80's and probably still does.


Saint Marie Romain Catholic Church
View attachment 1673048
View attachment 1673049
The church, rectory, child care, and a small school are close to the credit union. This is one of the real ornate churches in the area.
When I got here in the 80's, I would hear some people speaking French at some of the grocery stores, and occasionally when I was at St. Mary's Bank. I haven't heard people speaking French in many years, but may still be some people using it on the West side of the city, which was heavily French-Canadian. I suspect that ethnic concentration has dissolved over the years.
I remember going to a hockey game in Manchester around 1967 with a friend who was subbing anonymously for the Concord Coachmen. Most of the folks in the stands were speaking French.

You needed at least one New England triple-decker for your portfolio. The credit union isn't quite a classic representative of the genre -- wider and grander than the more humble specimens that house six families in two apartments on each floor -- but it will do.
 
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Jan 22, 2019
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1,935
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Jupiter, FL
Real Name
Andy
I set out today on a quest for a good train photograph, before getting the shot I wanted, it was very enjoyable walking around Chicago with the extremely compact W-Nikkor 35.

2. Lens flare shooting into the sun on the Armitage platform of the Brown Line
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3. The outbound train on the Blue Line
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4. The State Street Exit
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5. Tourist
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Joined
Aug 22, 2009
Messages
11,723
Location
NH, USA
Joined
Aug 22, 2009
Messages
11,723
Location
NH, USA
Day 30 bucket for Nashua

Killicut-Way House
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From Wikipedia...
"Estimated to have been built c. 1740, this 1-1/2 story Cape style house is one of the oldest buildings in Nashua, and one of a small number of houses from that period in the region that is relatively unaltered."


Abbot-Spalding House
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From historical marker...
"Built in 1803-1804, the Abbot-Spalding House exemplifies the Federal and Colonial Revival styles of architecture in Nashua, with the interior featuring fine woodwork and cabinetry. Daniel Abbot, the "Father of Nashua," and his family were the original residents. William Spalding, a noted banker and antique dealer, and his family were the last residents. Spalding and his cabinetmaker son, Dexter, update the residence with Colonial Revival retailing in the early 20th century. The hose was acquired by the Nashua Historical Society in 1978."


Hunt Memorial Library
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From Wikipedia...
"It is a multi-level structure built of brick laid in Flemish bond, with limestone trim. Its three-story square tower is an imposing presence at the upper end of Main Street, with a staircase turret projecting from one corner. The tower has buttressed corners and large Gothic-arched windows, and houses a four-face clock in its upper level. It is topped by a crenellated parapet. The main entrance is located at the base of the tower, in a Gothic-arched opening with heavy oaken double doors with book-leaf panels.

The building was constructed in 1903, and is an early work of architect Ralph Adams Cram, then early in a distinguished career. Cram was a native of New Hampshire, and was during his career a major proponent of renewed interest in Gothic Revival architecture. The Hunt Building includes good examples of the architectural vocabulary Cram developed for this role. It was used as a library until 1971."
 

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