Critique 2020 Octoberfest - NEF Said (Paul) Hardcore - 28mm f2.8 Ais Day 30

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You should make a book of these photos. What a neat ABC journey you have had. I haven't commented on all of them but I have looked at and enjoyed them all. You win the prize for the most effort expended and rewarding meme of the cafe in my opinion.
Thanks for the kind words. I’m glad you are enjoying the shots and stories.
 
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From the last time I posted, I had completed shooting historical buildings in towns alphabetically from "A" through "X" (ok, well X was a stretch with Exeter). Only "Y" and "Z" remain.

Knowing that the English alphabet is just a wee bit shy of 31 characters :), I've decided to, weather permitting (and it's been touch and go), to fill in the remaining days of the month with historical building in CITIES.

Also, feeling a bit guilty that there's no "Z" named town, and that I couldn't think of a creative shot, I decided to take the opportunity to journey to a gold mine of historical places today and shoot my first city and do a lame shot for "Z".

I'll pick up "Y" tomorrow, and then continue with more cities...
 
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Day 25: Stoneham Stone Zoo
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At least it is historical, starting in 1905 as the Middlesex Fells Zoo. It had its ups and downs, closed, and reopened a few times, and is currently open. It is a small zoo (26 acres), and there were quite a few people there today.

Day 25: Boston Old State House
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I focused on just the downtown area, as there are way too many places to shoot in Boston. Note: I'm the picture is one of the "Duck Boats", a World War II amphibious vehicle that used by a tour company. They are very informative, entertaining tours (on land and water).

From Wikipedia on the State House...
"Today's brick Old State House was built in 1712–13, and possibly designed by Robert Twelves. Some historians credit Thomas Dawes with being the architect, but he was of a later generation, so evidently his contributions came later. This was probably in about 1772, after a four-year period of the General Assembly having to meet in Cambridge due to British use of the building as a military barrack (which resulted in considerable damage). The previous building, the wooden Town House of 1657, had burned in the fire of 1711. A notable feature was the pair of seven-foot tall wooden figures depicting a lion and unicorn, symbols of the British monarchy.

The building housed a Merchant's Exchange on the first floor and warehouses in the basement. On the second floor, the east side contained the Council Chamb of the Royal Governor while the west end of the second floor contained chambers for the Courts of Suffolk County and the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. The central portion contained the chambers for the elected Massachusetts Assembly. This chamber is notable for including public galleries, the first known example of such a feature being included in a chamber for elected officials in the English-speaking world.

The interior was rebuilt in 1748, after a fire in 1747 (the brick walls of the 1712–13 building survived the fire).

In 1761, James Otis argued against the Writs of Assistance in the Royal Council Chamber. Though he lost the case, Otis influenced public opinion in a way that contributed to the American Revolution; John Adams later wrote of that speech, "Then and there ... the child independence was born."

On July 18, 1776, the Declaration of Independence was proclaimed from the east side balcony to jubilant crowds by Col. Thomas Crafts (one of the Sons of Liberty). At one o'clock Col. Crafts rose in the Council Chamber and read it to the members. Then, fellow patriot Sheriff William Greenleaf attempted to read it from the balcony, but he could only muster a whisper. Col. Crafts then stood next to the sheriff and read it from the balcony in a stentorian tone. For most people, it was a festive occasion, as about two-thirds of Boston residents supported the revolution. The lion and the unicorn on top of the building were removed and burned in a bonfire in King street.

After the American Revolution, the building served as the seat of the Massachusetts state government before its move to the present Massachusetts State House in 1798."

Link with more info about the building.

I'll drop (pour/flood) some other shots of Boston historical buildings in the bucket.
 
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Day 24
For the letter "X"...

Phillips Exeter Academy
View attachment 1672722
From the Exeter historical society website...
"In April 1781 John Phillips founded Phillips Exeter Academy with an endowment of about $60,000. The school, which opened in May 1783, was fortunate in attracting to its earliest classes a number of talented young men - Lewis Cass, Daniel Webster, Edward Everett, and George Bancroft, to name but a few. Thereby, the academy almost from its beginning became well known and has since been an important element in the town of Exeter."
Thanks so much for posting this. I spent many, many hours in this building learning Algebra, Latin and Greek (English and Science were in a different building), and I lived for the 1962-63 and 63-64 academic years in the building to the right of the Academy Building -- Peabody Hall. Mike Kernodle and I occupied the rooms on the second floor in the corner obscured by the trees. He's my oldest friend -- just videoed with him last week on Messenger. The Academy Building dates to 1915. Peabody dates to 1896 (the year my father was born).

Peabody in 2016 (no air conditioners when we lived there).
15592280277_46b73fac2e_o (2).jpeg
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Day 26: York Maine Cape Neddick Light
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Commonly known as the Nubble Lighthouse, on Nubble Island. I just had to make this the historic shot for York, being such a huge landmark. The weather was really iffy, with off and on rain, and bitter cold.

From Wikipedia...
"The Cape Neddick Light is a lighthouse in Cape Neddick, York, Maine. In 1874 Congress appropriated $15,000 to build a light station at the "Nubble" and in 1879 construction began. Cape Neddick Light Station was dedicated by the U.S. Lighthouse Serviceand put into use in 1879. It is still in use today.

Plans had been in the works to build a lighthouse on the site since 1837. The tower is lined with brick and sheathed with cast iron. It stands 41 feet (12 m) tall but the light is 88 feet (27 m) above sea level because of the additional height of the steep rocky islet on which it sits. Unusually, the stanchions of the walkway railing around the lantern room are decorated with 4-inch (100 mm) brass replicas of the lighthouse itself."


Coastline right by the lighthouse...
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I'll place other York buildings in the bucket. This completes the A-Z posts of historic sites from towns. Will continue with historic places in cities of New Hampshire for the rest of the week (weather cooperating).
 
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For history buffs, Wikipedia had this on York Maine...
"First settled by Europeans in 1624, the plantation was originally called Agamenticus, the Abenaki term for the York River. In 1638, settlers changed the name to Bristol after Bristol, England, from which they had immigrated. Envisioning a great city arising from the wilderness, Sir Ferdinando Gorges, lord proprietor of Maine under the Plymouth patent, named the capital of his province Gorgeana. On March 1, 1642, by charter of King Charles I, Gorgeana became the first incorporated city in America.

Following Gorges' death, the Massachusetts Bay Colony claimed his dominion. In 1652, York, Massachusetts, was incorporated from a portion of Gorgeana, making it the second oldest town in Maine after Kittery, incorporated two years earlier. It was named for York, England. But control of the region was contested between New England and New France, which incited Native Americans to attack English settlements throughout the French and Indian Wars.

The first Congregational church of York was organized in 1672, by Rev. Shubael Dummer, the son of Richard Dummer and uncle to William Dummer, who became acting governor of the Province of Massachusetts Bay.

During King William's War, York was destroyed in the Candlemas Massacre of 1692. During the raid by the Abenakis, Dummer was shot at his own front door. About 50 others were slain and near 100 carried away captive, among them Dummer's wife, Lydia, and their son, where "through snows and hardships among those dragons of the desert she also quickly died"; nothing further was heard of the boy.

The final local Indian attack occurred at the Cape Neddick area during Dummer's War in 1723. Hostilities diminished with the French defeat at the Siege of Louisbourg (1745), and ceased altogether with the 1763 Treaty of Paris."
 
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I can't believe you found something for every letter of the alphabet!! Well done. I love lighthouse photos. You found a pretty one.
Thanks!

It was really tough. I should have planned a bit more, before the Oktoberfest started. Now, I'll continue with some historical buildings in cities (something we have a lot of in NH).
 
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Day 26: York Maine Cape Neddick Light
View attachment 1672885
Commonly known as the Nubble Lighthouse, on Nubble Island. I just had to make this the historic shot for York, being such a huge landmark. The weather was really iffy, with off and on rain, and bitter cold.

From Wikipedia...
"The Cape Neddick Light is a lighthouse in Cape Neddick, York, Maine. In 1874 Congress appropriated $15,000 to build a light station at the "Nubble" and in 1879 construction began. Cape Neddick Light Station was dedicated by the U.S. Lighthouse Serviceand put into use in 1879. It is still in use today.

Plans had been in the works to build a lighthouse on the site since 1837. The tower is lined with brick and sheathed with cast iron. It stands 41 feet (12 m) tall but the light is 88 feet (27 m) above sea level because of the additional height of the steep rocky islet on which it sits. Unusually, the stanchions of the walkway railing around the lantern room are decorated with 4-inch (100 mm) brass replicas of the lighthouse itself."


Coastline right by the lighthouse...
View attachment 1672886

I'll place other York buildings in the bucket. This completes the A-Z posts of historic sites from towns. Will continue with historic places in cities of New Hampshire for the rest of the week (weather cooperating).
I have been really liking all of your building shots ... and the stories behind them. These are an excellent change of pace. The lighthouse shot composition is a particularly nice image. Well done!!

Ken
 

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