Critique 2020 Octoberfest - NEF Said (Paul) Hardcore - 28mm f2.8 Ais Day 30

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Day 27: Concord - New Hampshire State House
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From historical marker for the building...
"The State Capitol Building of New Hampshire was built 1816~19 by Stuart J. Park. It is constructed of New Hampshire granite quarried in Concord. The original part was occupied June 2, 1819 and is the nation's oldest State Capitol in which a legislature meets in its original chambers."

From Wikipedia about the city...
"The area that would become Concord was originally settled thousands of years ago by Abenaki Native Americans called the Pennacook. The tribe fished for migrating salmon, sturgeon, and alewives with nets strung across the rapids of the Merrimack River. The stream was also the transportation route for their birch bark canoes, which could travel from Lake Winnipesaukee to the Atlantic Ocean. The broad sweep of the Merrimack River valley floodplain provided good soil for farming beans, gourds, pumpkins, melonsand maize.

The area was first settled in 1659 as "Penacook". On January 17, 1725, the Province of Massachusetts Bay, which then claimed territories west of the Merrimack River, granted the Concord area as the Plantation of Penacook. It was settled between 1725 and 1727 by Captain Ebenezer Eastman and others from Haverhill, Massachusetts. On February 9, 1734, the town was incorporated as "Rumford", from which Sir Benjamin Thompson, Count Rumford would take his title. It was renamed "Concord" in 1765 by Governor Benning Wentworthfollowing a bitter boundary dispute between Rumford and the town of Bow; the city name was meant to reflect the new concord, or harmony, between the disputant towns. Citizens displaced by the resulting border adjustment were given land elsewhere as compensation. In 1779, New Pennacook Plantation was granted to Timothy Walker Jr. and his associates at what would be incorporated in 1800 as Rumford, Maine, the site of Pennacook Falls.

Concord grew in prominence throughout the 18th century, and some of the earliest houses from this period survive at the northern end of Main Street. In the years following the Revolution, Concord's central geographical location made it a logical choice for the state capital, particularly after Samuel Blodget in 1807 opened a canal and lock system to allow vessels passage around the Amoskeag Falls downriver, connecting Concord with Boston by way of the Middlesex Canal. In 1808, Concord was named the official seat of state government. The 1819 State House is the oldest capitol in the nation in which the state's legislative branches meet in their original chambers. The city would become noted for furniture-making and granite quarrying. In 1828, Lewis Downing joined J. Stephens Abbot to form Abbot and Downing. Their most famous product was their Concord coach, widely used in the development of the American West. In the 19th century, Concord became a hub for the railroad industry, with Penacook a textile manufacturing center using water power from the Contoocook River."
 
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That is a beautiful state house!! You had a glorious day to photograph it with the light clouds and beautiful fall foliage.
Thanks! I got lucky with the weather as it keeps transitioning between partial clouds, cloudy, rain, back to partial clouds.

looking like 60-70% chance of precipitation for the next three days. :(
 
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Day 28: Derry Robert Frost Homestead
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From Wikipedia...
"The Robert Frost Farm in Derry, New Hampshire is a two-story, clapboard, connected farm built in 1884. It was the home of poet Robert Frost from 1900 to 1911.
...
Frost lived in the house from the fall of 1900 until it was sold in November 1911. The majority of the poems collected in his first two books, A Boy's Will and North of Boston, were written here. Many of the poems in his 1916 collection Mountain Intervalwere also written at the Derry farm. Frost once said, "There was something about the experience at Derry which stayed in my mind, and was tapped for poetry in the years that came after." During this period Frost also published a dozen articles for two agricultural trade journals: The Eastern Poultryman and The Farm-Poultry.

Elliott, first son of Frost and his wife Elinor, died on the farm in 1900 at age four, likely due to influenza. The other children were educated at home by their parents. Lesley Frost later recalled she was "taught the alphabet on a typewriter... My mother taught the organized subjects, reading (the phonetic method), writing (then known as penmanship), geography, spelling. My father took on botany and astronomy."

A hired man named Carl Burrell (and, occasionally, Burrell's father) assisted with farming duties like building hen coops, tending livestock, and picking apples and pears. Locals thought Frost was lazy as a farmer. He later recalled that they were correct: "I always liked to sit up all hours of the night planning some inarticulate crime, going out to work when the spirit moved me, something they shook their heads ominously at, with proper prejudice. They would talk among themselves about my lack of energy. I was a failure in their eyes from the start."

The family moved out in the fall of 1909 to rented lodgings in Derry Village while Frost taught at the Pinkerton Academy. They later moved to Plymouth, New Hampshire, so that Frost could teach at the Plymouth Normal School.

In the 1940s, after Frost had left the farm, the property took on use as a junk yard. The field behind the home was littered with hundreds of junk cars, and the home itself fell into disrepair. The property was obtained by the state of New Hampshire in 1964. By 1975, restorations were complete and the farm was opened for public visitation."
 
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For some reason, Day 28 didn't post, but it was still in my browser, so I just re-posted the item.
 
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Day 29: Manchester

There are tons of houses, mills, and businesses in Manchester that are on the National Registry of Historic places. I had a hard time picking the entry for this submission. I chose a newer home (1950), but it is from a very famous architect. In the bucket I'll post several others, as I really like the looks of some of the houses.

Doctor Isadore J. Zimmerman House
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From Wikipedia...
"It is a single-story structure, set on a floating concrete slab. It is organized around a large L-shaped central chimney, and covered by a deeply overhanging roof. The rooms are arranged in a single line, except with an open carport at one end. The interior is largely finished in cypress wood.

The house was designed in 1950 by Frank Lloyd Wright in his Usonian style for Dr. Isadore and Lucille Zimmerman. It has two bedrooms, is based on a four foot module, and is constructed of red glazed brick with Georgia cypress trim (less expensive than tidewater cypress). John Geiger, then an apprentice in Wright's Taliesin Fellowship, was sent to New Hampshire to supervise the construction of the Zimmerman house. He is responsible for the completion of the project and much of its final changes for the clients. Wright redesigned the house around a rock just outside the front entrance. Wright's design extended to include the interior furniture and furnishings. This includes a musical quartet stand, as well as the mailbox. Wright also specified the plantings for the garden."

This is owned by the Currier Art Gallery, which run tours - a pretty interesting house to visit. Frank Lloyd Wright also designed another, lesser known house, just down the street, for
Toufic H. Kalil. I think last year, the Gallery purchased the residence and is remodeling it for viewing as well. It's another Usonian design but not as unique as this one.
 
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Day 30: Nashua General George Stark House
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From Wikipedia...
"It is a 2-1/2 story wood frame structure, covered by a low-pitch gabled and hipped roof with elongated eaves supported by brackets. It has an irregular plan, with a three-story square tower rising over its entrance, which is set in an arched opening. The main block is finished in flushboarding, while an ell extending west behind the tower is clapboarded. A single-story hip-roofed porch extends across its street-facing eastern facade, with arched openings and a dentillated and bracketed cornice.

The house was built by George Stark, a Manchester native and civil engineer who worked on railroad projects across northern New England. He became superintendent of the Nashua and Lowell Railroad in 1857. Design inspiration for the house came from Andrew Jackson Downing's works. The house was used for many years of the 20th century by the local congregation of the Church of Christ, Scientist. Despite this conversion of use, the interior retains many original finishes, including builtin bookcases with glazed doors."

Wikipedia about Nashua...
"The area was part of a 200-square-mile (520 km2) tract of land in Massachusetts called "Dunstable", which had been awarded to Edward Tyng of Dunstable, England.
...
Located at the confluence of the Nashua and Merrimack rivers, Dunstable was first settled about 1654 as a fur trading town. Like many 19th century riverfront New Englandcommunities, it would be developed during the Industrial Revolution with textile mills operated from water power. By 1836, the Nashua Manufacturing Company had built three cotton mills which produced 9.3 million yards of cloth annually on 710 looms. On December 31, 1836, the New Hampshire half of Dunstable was renamed "Nashua", after the Nashua River, by a declaration of the New Hampshire legislature (the Dunstable name lives on across the Massachusetts border).[7] The Nashua River was named by the Nashuway Indians, and in the Penacook language it means "beautiful stream with a pebbly bottom",[8] with an alternative meaning of "land between two rivers".
...
Like the rival Amoskeag Manufacturing Company upriver in Manchester, the Nashua mills prospered until about World War I, after which a slow decline set in. Water power was replaced with newer forms of energy to run factories. Cotton could be manufactured into fabric where it grew, saving transportation costs. The textile business started moving to the South during the Great Depression, with the last mill closing in 1949. Many citizens were left unemployed. But then Sanders Associates, a newly created defense firm that is now part of BAE Systems, moved into one of the closed mills and launched the city's rebirth. Besides being credited with reviving the city's economy, Sanders Associates also played a key role in the development of the home video game console market. Ralph H. Baer, an employee of Sanders, developed what would become the Magnavox Odyssey, the first commercial home video game system."

My first job, out of college, of which was the reason I moved to New Hampshire (from Pennsylvania), was working with Sanders Associates.
 
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Day 31: Portsmouth New Hampshire

There's a reason why I wanted to pick Portsmouth, as it has a huge number of buildings on the National Registry of Historic Places. That too, makes for a problem, trying to decide which places to shoot, how much time to spend, and in this case, how long do I want to walk around in 20 degree weather shooting photos.

It was fun though, as there is lots of eye candy to shoot. I skipped Strawberry Bank, with all the old homes, and stopped in some key areas. My selection, rather than a town hall or meeting house, was to pick a famous historical house...


John Paul Jones House
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From Wikipedia...
"The 2-1/2 story wood frame house was built in 1758 by the master housewright Hopestill Cheswell, a successful African-American builder in the city. The house was built for Captain Gregory Purcell, who owned it with his wife Sarah until his death in 1776.

After Purcell's death his wife took in boarders, until her own death in 1783. The American naval hero John Paul Jones rented a room at the widow Purcell's during 1781-1782, while supervising construction of the ship America.
...
The house is 2-1/2 stories high, with a gambrel roof, and two chimneys projecting from the interior. A two-story addition to the northeast was added in the early 19th century. The five-bay main facade has a central entry topped by a segmented arch pediment, supported by flanking pilasters. The first floor windows of the main facade are topped by triangular pediments. The interior of the house follows a typical Georgian center-hall plan, with rooms flanking a central hall with stairs. To the left of the hall are a parlor in front, and a counting room or office in the rear, while to the right is a large dining room with what was originally the kitchen behind. Upstairs there are four bedrooms; that of Jones was in the southeast corner. The third floor has five bedrooms."
 
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I have 22 other houses that were pretty cool, each in different styles and colors. A few that were just interesting and not well known, historical sites. You can view them HERE, if you're into old houses and buildings. Just look for Day 31 titles.
 

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