Critique 2020 Octoberfest - NEF Said (Paul) Hardcore - 28mm f2.8 Ais Day 30

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Day 17 Quincy MA: John Adam's Birthplace
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From wikipedia...
"It is the saltbox home in which the second president of the United States, John Adams, was born in 1735.
...
The house is a 2 1⁄2 story wood frame structure, sheathed in wooden clapboards. There are two main rooms, one on either side of a central chimney, on each of the two floors, and there are two further rooms in the lean to section on the first floor. The main facade is three bays wide with the entry in the center. The doorway is framed by pilasters and topped by an entablature and triangular pediment."

I'll put a few more photos of places of interest, in the bucket.
 
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That is neat. Why does the left edge of the roof look different from the rest? Is it in the process of being repaired? It looks like there is scaffolding on the right side of the house. I love the way these old buildings you are showing us are cared for.
 
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That is neat. Why does the left edge of the roof look different from the rest? Is it in the process of being repaired? It looks like there is scaffolding on the right side of the house. I love the way these old buildings you are showing us are cared for.
I think three repaired the shingles there. Yes, there was scaffolding, so I tried to frame the picture and use this side to minimize the distraction.
 
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Day 18 (taken yesterday): Rollingsford Town Hall
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From Wikipedia...
"It is a 2-1/2 story wood frame structure, set on a high brick foundation. A four-story tower projects slightly from the northeast corner, capped by a pyramidal roof. Although the building has been clad in vinyl siding, some of its original Victorian trim is still in place, along the main roof eave and that of the tower. The main entrance is in the base of the tower facing north, sheltered by a gabled porch with round Ionic columns set on brick piers. The gable front is broken by a half-round lunette with spindles descending. Its first floor is occupied by offices, and its upper floor is taken up by an auditorium space with balcony and stage. The basement level, accessible from 4th Street, has a garage door opening which was originally used to house fire equipment.[2]

The building was designed by Alvah Ramsdell, a regionally prominent architect, and was completed in 1893."

This town is right on the Maine border (yes, I drove down to Quincy MA and then up to Maine state line on my travel yesterday).
 
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Wikipedia info on the town history...
The area was once within the domain of the Newichawannock Indians, an Abenaki sub-tribe which took its name from the Newichawannock River, meaning "river with many falls," now the Salmon Falls River. Their village was located at what is today Salmon Falls Village. They fished at the falls, stretching nets across the river to catch migrating salmon and other species swimming upriver to spawn. But war and disease, probably smallpox brought from abroad, decimated the native population.

Subsequently, settled by about 1630, the land was part of Dover, one of the original townships of New Hampshire. The area was first called Sligo, likely after the County Sligo in Ireland, and the name survives on a town road. An historical marker on Sligo Road reads, "Near this place lived David Hamilton of Westburn born in the parish of Cambuslang, Scotland in October 1620; captured by Oliver Cromwell at the Battle of Worcester, England, September 3, 1651; Brought to America as a prisoner in chains on the "John and Sarah" in the same year; settled near here and married Annah Jaxson of Lanark, Scotland. Killed by Indians on September 28, 1691."

In 1729 the area was established as a parish called "Summersworth", meaning summer town, because the ministers preached here during the summer. In 1754, it was set off and incorporated as a town by colonial Governor Benning Wentworth, although thereafter spelled "Somersworth" due to a clerical error. Since the first settlers' arrival, small communities had developed near various sawmills and gristmills along the Salmon Falls River, but the center of "Summersworth" was located at Rollinsford Junction.

Beginning in the early 1820s, water powered textile mills were established at the larger falls, and the town was divided between them—Great Falls became Somersworth, and Salmon Falls became Rollinsford, incorporated in 1849. It was named in honor of the Rollins family, whose ancestor Judge Ichabod Rollins had settled there many generations before and had become the first probate judge for the state."
 
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I continue to really enjoy your series. Are most of these buildings still in use or are they mostly "museums"? Especially John Adam's home?

Ken
Many of the building I've taken pictures of, especially the town halls/meetinghouses, are still in use. The ones in Quincy were mostly museums or preserved historical sites (other than the fire station in the bucket). Most of the homes I've been shooting have been in use as well. The Wentworth house in Rollingsford was the first museum I saw (other than the Adams' homes).
 
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Day 19 South Sutton (double S! :) )Meetinghouse...
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From Wikipedia...
"The South Sutton Meeting House is sited atop a knoll overlooking the village, on the west side of Meeting House Hill Road. Facing south, it is a 1-1/2 story wood frame structure, with a gabled roof. Its walls are sheathed in clapboards and rest on a granite foundation. Its main facade has two entries, each of which is flanked by sidelight windows and framed by a moulded casing based on designs published by Asher Benjamin. The gable end is an enclosed pediment, whose tympanum has a fan that screens an attic window. There is a single window above the paired doorways. The building has been little altered since its construction; the only significant modification has been the digging of a cellar in which to install a furnace, done c. 1899, and the repair of lightning-related damage.

The meeting house was built in 1839 for the local Congregationalist congregation. It is fairly typical of many churches built across southern and central New Hampshire in the second quarter of the 19th century, a building spurt occasioned by state legislation mandating the separation of church and civic functions, passed in 1819. Of these, it is among the least altered: most have had stylistic alterations made such as the introduction of stained glass windows or a remodeling of the interior in the late 19th century, or have had additions made to them."
 
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I truly continue to enjoy your theme for the meme.
Thanks! I'm mapping out the rest of the alphabet. I have T, U, and W covered. I have one possible candidate for V, but I don't think the town has any historical buildings (left?). Only a stretch for X (I should have use Exeter and picked another town for E). No idea at all for Z. No towns with Z in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Massachusetts.
 

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