Critique 2020 Octoberfest - NEF Said (Paul) Hardcore - 28mm f2.8 Ais Day 30

Joined
Aug 22, 2009
Messages
11,727
Location
NH, USA
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #142
Day 20: Temple Town Hall
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

From Wikipedia...
"It is a single-story structure, its original core built out of heavy timber framing. It is covered by a gabled roof and sheathed in wooden clapboards. A square tower rises above the east-facing front facade. The main facade is three bays wide, with corner pilasters rising to an entablature and fully pedimented gable. The main entrance is at its center, topped by a large multipane transom window. The tower has a plain first stage finished in clapboards, while the second stage, housing the belfry, is finished in flushboarding with louvered openings.

The structure was built in 1842 as a church. In 1875, the building was sold to the local grange chapter, which enlarged the building in the 1880s, adding 20 feet (6.1 m) to its length. This additional space provided interior space for a stage, which was used for grange rituals and dramatic presentations. The town purchased the building from the grange in 1889, although it continued to be used by the grange in addition to serving as a place for town functions. It was used by the town as a meeting space until 1990, and continues to be used for social functions."
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2009
Messages
11,727
Location
NH, USA
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #143
From Wikipedia on the town of Temple...
"The area was first called "Peterborough Slip", which included what is now the town of Sharon. In 1758, Maj. Ephraim Heald and his wife Sarah, along with his brother, Deacon Peter Heald, and a cousin, Oliver Heald, were among the first settlers. Peter Heald is generally considered to be the founder of Temple, and his child, Peter, was the first male child born in the town. In 1768, it was incorporated by colonial Governor John Wentworth, who named it after his lieutenant governor, John Temple."

Another historical note about Temple...
"The New England Glassworks was a short-lived glass-making factory located in Temple, New Hampshire in the 1780s, and one of the first glassworks in the United States. Founded in 1780 by Robert Hewes, a Boston-based businessman, the glassworks employed Hessian deserters from the British forces of the American Revolutionary War. The glassworks was established in 1780 and failed due to a lack of financing in 1783."

I read that the building was burned down in a fire, and they were unable to raise money to rebuild. In the 1970s, archeologists did the largest industrial dig in New Hampshire at the site.
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2009
Messages
11,727
Location
NH, USA
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #147
Thanks guys! I had a few shots, but liked this angle with the tree. Glad I made the right choice.
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2009
Messages
11,727
Location
NH, USA
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #148
Day 21: Unity Town Hall
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

It was a foggy, misty day, but I took a risk to drive an 1.25 hours out to the only town starting with U, in New Hampshire. This was in the middle of nowhere and there are less than 1,700 people living in the area of about 37 square miles.

Wikipedia about the town...
"Prior to British colonization, the Connecticut River valley was populated by bands of the Western Abenaki, who lived in sometimes-large villages of longhouses. Depending on the season, they would either remain near their villages to fish, gather plants, engage in sugaring, and trade or fight with their neighbors, or head to nearby fowling and hunting grounds. Later, they also farmed tobacco and the "three sisters": corn, beans, and squash.

Colonization eventually resulted in the establishment of the Province of New Hampshire. Within that province, the area known as modern-day Unity was part of a territory chartered in 1753 and named "Buckingham" after John Hobart, 1st Earl of Buckinghamshire. Grants in the area were given by both the early Massachusetts governmentand by Governor Benning Wentworth, which led to disputes. The town was incorporated as "Unity" in 1764 after amicable resolutions of the disputes were reached."

Wikipedia about the building...
"It is a single-story wood frame structure, with a gabled roof and clapboarded exterior. It has modest Greek Revival styling, with plain cornerboards and a cornice with decorative molding. An entry pavilion projects from the main block, echoing its decorative features, and there is a two-stage tower with an open belfry. The two entrances are topped by Federal-style fanlights, and there is a half-eye window in the pavilion's gable. The tower's first stage has louvered openings with half-round fanlight tops, and is itself crowned by a low balustrade with urned posts. The belfry, with arched openings, is crowned by a similar but smaller balustrade, which surround a cupola and weathervane.

The structure was built in 1831 as a church for the local Baptist congregation which was organized in 1794. Although its builder is unknown, the building's design is strongly influenced by the work of Elias Carter, a builder responsible for a number of period churches further south. The Baptists sold the church to the town in 1877."
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2009
Messages
11,727
Location
NH, USA
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #152
Thanks all!

is getting hard for these last letters of the alphabet. Tomorrow (V) will be a stretch. Lots of choices for W. No X, so will need to revisit a town (Exeter) or do another E town and consider the previous Exeter as X (should have thought of that earlier).

No towns in New England with Z, so I’m thinking of filling that and the remaining days with historical buildings for cities, which I’ve been avoiding.
 
Joined
Oct 25, 2007
Messages
4,024
Location
Potomac Falls, VA
Thanks all!

is getting hard for these last letters of the alphabet. Tomorrow (V) will be a stretch. Lots of choices for W. No X, so will need to revisit a town (Exeter) or do another E town and consider the previous Exeter as X (should have thought of that earlier).

No towns in New England with Z, so I’m thinking of filling that and the remaining days with historical buildings for cities, which I’ve been avoiding.
Can you find a Zoo?
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2009
Messages
11,727
Location
NH, USA
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #156
Day 22: Mont Vernon Town Hall
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

From Wikipedia, about the town...
"It is not clear why it is spelled differently from the many other towns in the United States named after Mount Vernon, the home of George Washington. Some say the "u" in "Mount" was accidentally dropped by a town clerk filling out official papers; some say the change was made deliberately to draw attention to the town; some say it uses the French spelling of "mont" as a nod to what was then the region's large French-Canadian population. According to town history, there was some dispute about how to spell the name as late as the 1920s, with the post office and one of its most prominent hotels using a "u" for many decades.
...
Mont Vernon's general history follows that of many towns in this region: Originally settled for agriculture, its farms were hard hit after the Civil War when railroads opened up better farming land in the Midwest. Population peaked in 1870 and began to decline.

By the late 1890s it had become a tourist town, drawing summer visitors from points south, notably Boston, who escaped the heat in Mont Vernon's hills. At one point it had five large summer hotels, including the Grand Hotel, located on top of Grand Hill.

The hotel business began to wither with the development of the automobile, which allowed tourists to reach places like the White Mountains of New Hampshire, and it was killed by the Great Depression. The town's population bottomed out at barely 300 in 1930, at which time the Grand Hotel was destroyed in a fire. The remaining hotels were torn down before World War II.

Since the war, Mont Vernon has slowly become a suburban community. This was significantly accelerated in 1962-63 when engineers and technicians employed at Sanders Associates in Nashua found homes in Mont Vernon attractive. It wasn't until the 1970 census that the town's official population passed mid-19th century highs."

Side Note: I started my professional career at Sanders Associates (a defense contractor, bought by Lockheed-Martin, and later BAE Systems). They and Digital Equipment Corporation, were the largest employers of the state.

I couldn't find info on the town hall, other than the 1781 date on the front of the building. The town was incorporated in 1803.
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2009
Messages
11,727
Location
NH, USA
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #160
What’s in the on deck circle? Worcester? Waltham? Wellesley? The W’s abound...
It looks like Wilton and Weare NH are targeted for tomorrow. Seems like several historical places in those two towns. But, yeah, lots of W towns just in NH. Good thing as I’m using more gas this month than I used in the past three months. Car is getting close to 180k miles too, so will be doing an oil change this weekend.
 

Latest posts

Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Nikon Cafe is a fan site and not associated with Nikon Corporation.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Copyright © 2005-2019 Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom