Critique 2020 Octoberfest - NEF Said (Paul) Hardcore - 28mm f2.8 Ais Day 30

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Classic NE architecture. Very fresh and popping colors. DEC was huge in communications gear and time shares. I remember having to run stat programs at my first job Ernst & Whinney (now Young) using a Decwriter - which was keyboard with a dot matrix printer....no CRT!
 
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Day 23: Wilton Town Hall and Theater
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From Wikipedia on the Town Hall...
"Wilton Town Hall occupies a prominent setting in the center of the town, on the east side of Main Street. It occupies a steeply sloping triangular lot bounded on the north by Maple Street. Its basement side is completely exposed on the Main Street side, and is composed of rustically cut Milford granite. The rest of the building is built out of load-bearing red brick, and is covered by a slate roof with a complex roofline. Windows in the upper levels are generally set in rounded-arch openings, and the roof is punctuated by several brick chimneys and a square clock tower. The clock is original to the building, made by George Milton Stevens of Boston, Massachusetts. The interior of the building is divided into civic offices and a theater. Its finishes are largely original, including fine woodwork on the main staircases, floors, and wainscoting.

The town hall was completed in 1886, and has housed town offices since then. It was the first building in the town dedicated to housing all of the town functions, including town clerk, police, and selectmen's offices. It was built in the aftermath of fires in 1874 and 1881 that destroyed much of what is now downtown Wilton. Its construction further cemented the importance of Wilton's East Village as the town's main village center."

It is currently used as a theater and town hall.
 
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Today, I'll submit two photos. Another shot of Exeter, which is the closest I can find to a town with "X", and since I did Exeter on day five, I'll add Epping, which can fill in for "E".

For the remaining letters of the alphabet, and additional days in the month, I have two plans. First, I'll fill remaining days with photos of historical buildings from cities, instead of towns. Second, I'll defer "Y" for a bit, so I can use Sunday to travel a bit more.
 
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Day 24
For the letter "X"...

Phillips Exeter Academy
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From the Exeter historical society website...
"In April 1781 John Phillips founded Phillips Exeter Academy with an endowment of about $60,000. The school, which opened in May 1783, was fortunate in attracting to its earliest classes a number of talented young men - Lewis Cass, Daniel Webster, Edward Everett, and George Bancroft, to name but a few. Thereby, the academy almost from its beginning became well known and has since been an important element in the town of Exeter."


For a replacement for "E"...

Epping Watson Academy
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From Wikipedia...
"The building is basically rectangular in form, with symmetrical single-story wings extending the front facade, and is finished in a combination of wooden clapboards and fish-scale shingles. It has a variety of gables and window sizes and shapes, typical of the Queen Anne period, as well as Stick style applied woodwork. It was originally adorned with decoratively corbelled brick chimneys and a conical tower; these features have been removed.

The school was built in 1883, and is the only known Queen Anne style school building in southern New Hampshire. It was designed by Dover architect Charles E. Joy, who moved to St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1884. The school was built with funds bequeathed by Daniel Watson Ladd, a local businessman, in order to provide secondary school educational opportunities to students whose families could not afford to send them to other private academies. The school was managed by private trustees for five years, and then turned over to the town. It served as Epping's high school from 1888 until 1966."
 
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Day 23: Wilton Town Hall and Theater
This fine example of a brick and stone building made me realize that the lion's share of the historic buildings you've shared this month have been clapboard siding. That makes their preservation all the more impressive.
Day 24
For the letter "X"...

Phillips Exeter Academy
Never hurts to visit this esteemed place more than once.
Epping Watson Academy
Such dedication to the task. I truly admire the effort.
 
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Arizona
Day 15: North Hampton Centennial Hall
View attachment 1672080

From Wikipedia about the town...
"
First settled in 1639, this town was a part of Hampton known as "North Hill" or "North Parish". Residents began petitioning for separation from Hampton as early as 1719, but township was not granted until 1742 by Colonial Governor Benning Wentworth, following separation of New Hampshire from Massachusetts. In 1831, North Hampton was represented in the New Hampshire House of Representatives by Benning Leavitt.

Little Boar's Head, a seaside promontory, became a fashionable summer resort area in the 19th century, and contains elegant examples of late Victorian and Edwardian architecture."

About the Hall, built in 1876...
"It is a two-story wood frame structure, with a truncated hip roof and clapboarded exterior. It has a three-bay facade, with the center bay projecting slightly and rising to an open belfry and pyramidal cap. The roof eaves are adorned with decorative brackets, and the front of the upper portion of the tower has applied wood work in the Stick Style. Windows on the ground floor are set under jigsawn bracketed gables, and their lintels also have small brackets. The main entrance is sheltered by a hip roof portico that is fronted by a Stick style gable."

I did a quick and dirty editing out of some power lines in the corner - probably should have spend a bit more time on it.
Day 16: Pembroke Mill
View attachment 1672147
From Wikipedia on the town...
"First granted in 1728, the town was known as "Lovewell's Town", in honor of Captain John Lovewell, who built the stockade at Ossipee. Shortly afterward, the town took the name of "Suncook", the Pennacook Abenaki name for the river flowing through the area. When the town was incorporated in 1759 by Colonial Governor Benning Wentworth, it was given the name "Pembroke" in honor of Henry Herbert, ninth Earl of Pembroke in southern Wales."

About the mill...
"The site where the mill was built has an industrial history beginning in the 18th century, when saw- and gristmills were established on the falls of the Suncook River. The Suncook Manufacturing Company was organized in 1860, buying up land and water rights on both sides of the river. The Pembroke Mill was its first building, completed the same year."

It now is used for residential housing.
Apologies for the massive catch-up posting.

15 - nice comp, love to see restoration work. It will be a shame if/ when these old building are gone.

16 - love the brick, quite a few places are re-purposing old industrial buildings as residential. Good re-use IMHO.
 
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Day 17 Quincy MA: John Adam's Birthplace
View attachment 1672209
From wikipedia...
"It is the saltbox home in which the second president of the United States, John Adams, was born in 1735.
...
The house is a 2 1⁄2 story wood frame structure, sheathed in wooden clapboards. There are two main rooms, one on either side of a central chimney, on each of the two floors, and there are two further rooms in the lean to section on the first floor. The main facade is three bays wide with the entry in the center. The doorway is framed by pilasters and topped by an entablature and triangular pediment."

I'll put a few more photos of places of interest, in the bucket.
Day 18 (taken yesterday): Rollingsford Town Hall
View attachment 1672303
From Wikipedia...
"It is a 2-1/2 story wood frame structure, set on a high brick foundation. A four-story tower projects slightly from the northeast corner, capped by a pyramidal roof. Although the building has been clad in vinyl siding, some of its original Victorian trim is still in place, along the main roof eave and that of the tower. The main entrance is in the base of the tower facing north, sheltered by a gabled porch with round Ionic columns set on brick piers. The gable front is broken by a half-round lunette with spindles descending. Its first floor is occupied by offices, and its upper floor is taken up by an auditorium space with balcony and stage. The basement level, accessible from 4th Street, has a garage door opening which was originally used to house fire equipment.[2]

The building was designed by Alvah Ramsdell, a regionally prominent architect, and was completed in 1893."

This town is right on the Maine border (yes, I drove down to Quincy MA and then up to Maine state line on my travel yesterday).
Day 19 South Sutton (double S! :) )Meetinghouse...
View attachment 1672345
From Wikipedia...
"The South Sutton Meeting House is sited atop a knoll overlooking the village, on the west side of Meeting House Hill Road. Facing south, it is a 1-1/2 story wood frame structure, with a gabled roof. Its walls are sheathed in clapboards and rest on a granite foundation. Its main facade has two entries, each of which is flanked by sidelight windows and framed by a moulded casing based on designs published by Asher Benjamin. The gable end is an enclosed pediment, whose tympanum has a fan that screens an attic window. There is a single window above the paired doorways. The building has been little altered since its construction; the only significant modification has been the digging of a cellar in which to install a furnace, done c. 1899, and the repair of lightning-related damage.

The meeting house was built in 1839 for the local Congregationalist congregation. It is fairly typical of many churches built across southern and central New Hampshire in the second quarter of the 19th century, a building spurt occasioned by state legislation mandating the separation of church and civic functions, passed in 1819. Of these, it is among the least altered: most have had stylistic alterations made such as the introduction of stained glass windows or a remodeling of the interior in the late 19th century, or have had additions made to them."
17 - that's in remarkably good condition considering the lack of eaves - I wonder how much repair/ restoration it has had over the years...

18 - cool building, nice comp on this one.

19 - another cool one, three-tiered steeple.
 
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Day 20: Temple Town Hall
View attachment 1672408
From Wikipedia...
"It is a single-story structure, its original core built out of heavy timber framing. It is covered by a gabled roof and sheathed in wooden clapboards. A square tower rises above the east-facing front facade. The main facade is three bays wide, with corner pilasters rising to an entablature and fully pedimented gable. The main entrance is at its center, topped by a large multipane transom window. The tower has a plain first stage finished in clapboards, while the second stage, housing the belfry, is finished in flushboarding with louvered openings.

The structure was built in 1842 as a church. In 1875, the building was sold to the local grange chapter, which enlarged the building in the 1880s, adding 20 feet (6.1 m) to its length. This additional space provided interior space for a stage, which was used for grange rituals and dramatic presentations. The town purchased the building from the grange in 1889, although it continued to be used by the grange in addition to serving as a place for town functions. It was used by the town as a meeting space until 1990, and continues to be used for social functions."
Day 21: Unity Town Hall
View attachment 1672469
It was a foggy, misty day, but I took a risk to drive an 1.25 hours out to the only town starting with U, in New Hampshire. This was in the middle of nowhere and there are less than 1,700 people living in the area of about 37 square miles.

Wikipedia about the town...
"Prior to British colonization, the Connecticut River valley was populated by bands of the Western Abenaki, who lived in sometimes-large villages of longhouses. Depending on the season, they would either remain near their villages to fish, gather plants, engage in sugaring, and trade or fight with their neighbors, or head to nearby fowling and hunting grounds. Later, they also farmed tobacco and the "three sisters": corn, beans, and squash.

Colonization eventually resulted in the establishment of the Province of New Hampshire. Within that province, the area known as modern-day Unity was part of a territory chartered in 1753 and named "Buckingham" after John Hobart, 1st Earl of Buckinghamshire. Grants in the area were given by both the early Massachusetts governmentand by Governor Benning Wentworth, which led to disputes. The town was incorporated as "Unity" in 1764 after amicable resolutions of the disputes were reached."

Wikipedia about the building...
"It is a single-story wood frame structure, with a gabled roof and clapboarded exterior. It has modest Greek Revival styling, with plain cornerboards and a cornice with decorative molding. An entry pavilion projects from the main block, echoing its decorative features, and there is a two-stage tower with an open belfry. The two entrances are topped by Federal-style fanlights, and there is a half-eye window in the pavilion's gable. The tower's first stage has louvered openings with half-round fanlight tops, and is itself crowned by a low balustrade with urned posts. The belfry, with arched openings, is crowned by a similar but smaller balustrade, which surround a cupola and weathervane.

The structure was built in 1831 as a church for the local Baptist congregation which was organized in 1794. Although its builder is unknown, the building's design is strongly influenced by the work of Elias Carter, a builder responsible for a number of period churches further south. The Baptists sold the church to the town in 1877."
Day 22: Mont Vernon Town Hall
View attachment 1672565
From Wikipedia, about the town...
"It is not clear why it is spelled differently from the many other towns in the United States named after Mount Vernon, the home of George Washington. Some say the "u" in "Mount" was accidentally dropped by a town clerk filling out official papers; some say the change was made deliberately to draw attention to the town; some say it uses the French spelling of "mont" as a nod to what was then the region's large French-Canadian population. According to town history, there was some dispute about how to spell the name as late as the 1920s, with the post office and one of its most prominent hotels using a "u" for many decades.
...
Mont Vernon's general history follows that of many towns in this region: Originally settled for agriculture, its farms were hard hit after the Civil War when railroads opened up better farming land in the Midwest. Population peaked in 1870 and began to decline.

By the late 1890s it had become a tourist town, drawing summer visitors from points south, notably Boston, who escaped the heat in Mont Vernon's hills. At one point it had five large summer hotels, including the Grand Hotel, located on top of Grand Hill.

The hotel business began to wither with the development of the automobile, which allowed tourists to reach places like the White Mountains of New Hampshire, and it was killed by the Great Depression. The town's population bottomed out at barely 300 in 1930, at which time the Grand Hotel was destroyed in a fire. The remaining hotels were torn down before World War II.

Since the war, Mont Vernon has slowly become a suburban community. This was significantly accelerated in 1962-63 when engineers and technicians employed at Sanders Associates in Nashua found homes in Mont Vernon attractive. It wasn't until the 1970 census that the town's official population passed mid-19th century highs."

Side Note: I started my professional career at Sanders Associates (a defense contractor, bought by Lockheed-Martin, and later BAE Systems). They and Digital Equipment Corporation, were the largest employers of the state.

I couldn't find info on the town hall, other than the 1781 date on the front of the building. The town was incorporated in 1803.
20 - cool shot, like the comp.

21 - another one with resto on-going, very prominent weather vane/ lightning rod.

22 - love the clock face.
 
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Day 23: Wilton Town Hall and Theater
View attachment 1672648
From Wikipedia on the Town Hall...
"Wilton Town Hall occupies a prominent setting in the center of the town, on the east side of Main Street. It occupies a steeply sloping triangular lot bounded on the north by Maple Street. Its basement side is completely exposed on the Main Street side, and is composed of rustically cut Milford granite. The rest of the building is built out of load-bearing red brick, and is covered by a slate roof with a complex roofline. Windows in the upper levels are generally set in rounded-arch openings, and the roof is punctuated by several brick chimneys and a square clock tower. The clock is original to the building, made by George Milton Stevens of Boston, Massachusetts. The interior of the building is divided into civic offices and a theater. Its finishes are largely original, including fine woodwork on the main staircases, floors, and wainscoting.

The town hall was completed in 1886, and has housed town offices since then. It was the first building in the town dedicated to housing all of the town functions, including town clerk, police, and selectmen's offices. It was built in the aftermath of fires in 1874 and 1881 that destroyed much of what is now downtown Wilton. Its construction further cemented the importance of Wilton's East Village as the town's main village center."

It is currently used as a theater and town hall.
Day 24
For the letter "X"...

Phillips Exeter Academy
View attachment 1672722
From the Exeter historical society website...
"In April 1781 John Phillips founded Phillips Exeter Academy with an endowment of about $60,000. The school, which opened in May 1783, was fortunate in attracting to its earliest classes a number of talented young men - Lewis Cass, Daniel Webster, Edward Everett, and George Bancroft, to name but a few. Thereby, the academy almost from its beginning became well known and has since been an important element in the town of Exeter."


For a replacement for "E"...

Epping Watson Academy
View attachment 1672723
From Wikipedia...
"The building is basically rectangular in form, with symmetrical single-story wings extending the front facade, and is finished in a combination of wooden clapboards and fish-scale shingles. It has a variety of gables and window sizes and shapes, typical of the Queen Anne period, as well as Stick style applied woodwork. It was originally adorned with decoratively corbelled brick chimneys and a conical tower; these features have been removed.

The school was built in 1883, and is the only known Queen Anne style school building in southern New Hampshire. It was designed by Dover architect Charles E. Joy, who moved to St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1884. The school was built with funds bequeathed by Daniel Watson Ladd, a local businessman, in order to provide secondary school educational opportunities to students whose families could not afford to send them to other private academies. The school was managed by private trustees for five years, and then turned over to the town. It served as Epping's high school from 1888 until 1966."
23 - I love this building - the contrast of the stones and brick, the stained glass, the chimneys, the cupola, weather vane. Wonderful shot of a beautiful building.

24 - Exeter Academy - another grand old building, love the patinad copper. Epping Academy - love the colors on the building.

I've loved watching these, will be interested to see what you come up with for the last week. The history you linked with each is a nice bonus.
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2009
Messages
11,753
Location
NH, USA
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #178
This fine example of a brick and stone building made me realize that the lion's share of the historic buildings you've shared this month have been clapboard siding. That makes their preservation all the more impressive.

Never hurts to visit this esteemed place more than once.

Such dedication to the task. I truly admire the effort.
Thanks! Glad there are so many places, as there have been quite a few subject to fires, storms, and neglect.
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2009
Messages
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Location
NH, USA
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #179
23 - I love this building - the contrast of the stones and brick, the stained glass, the chimneys, the cupola, weather vane. Wonderful shot of a beautiful building.

24 - Exeter Academy - another grand old building, love the patinad copper. Epping Academy - love the colors on the building.

I've loved watching these, will be interested to see what you come up with for the last week. The history you linked with each is a nice bonus.
Thanks for the kind comments. Is turning out to be a very consuming shoot this Oktoberfest, but I’m learning a lot about the history of these towns (I was born and raised in PA), getting to travel on some roads that are definitely “less traveled”, and working trying to shoot with Al sorts of obstacles (people, power lines, trees, and weather). It’s been fun so far.
 
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Idaho
You should make a book of these photos. What a neat ABC journey you have had. I haven't commented on all of them but I have looked at and enjoyed them all. You win the prize for the most effort expended and rewarding meme of the cafe in my opinion.
 

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