A Disturbing Trend -- Banned Tripods

Joined
Sep 13, 2007
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13,798
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Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
Lake O'Hara in the Canadian Rockies is a very special place and it has had a limit on the number of visitors for many years. Cars aren't allowed in and access is by reserved seats on a bus. If you are up to hiking or skiing the ~10 miles in you don't need to reserve and you even get a free ride out on the bus (at least you did when I hiked in many years ago).
Though I like the system and mentioned it earlier in the thread, it's quite costly -- about Canadian $15 per person for the round trip bus plus another charge for implementing the reservation. Even if you hike in and take the bus out, you have to pay about Canadian $10 per person plus the reservation charge. As someone mentioned earlier, it's a shame that the system is practical only for those who can afford it.

It used to be a lot more difficult to make those bus arrangements. They would open up the phone lines on a particular day months in advance of the day they were making reservations for. You had to keep calling in constantly and hope your phone call got answered in the first hour or so. Otherwise, the bus seats would be sold out by the time your phone call was answered. They now have an online reservations system that allows you to make the bus reservation any day so long as that particular bus isn't already sold out.
 
Joined
Mar 25, 2011
Messages
2,311
Location
London
Interesting read.
Parks seek ways to manage crowds, cars
I love the quote "an old Chinese proverb: “Discover a beautiful place, announce it to the world, the world arrives, and it is beautiful no more.”"

I am not an expert in this field, so my opinions are not well informed.
I don't see how anything fair could be implemented.

Thinking about my personal experience, is my "freedom" to travel across the world and explore it a good thing?
We commuting to the airport, fly across the world, rent cars, visit parks, stay in hotels and return home.
My impact on the environment is less than neutral to say the least.
Multiply this by hundreds of millions and it might be argued that some freedoms have a huge cost.

Take France, the most visited country in the world (World Tourism rankings - Wikipedia).
There are almost 83M people visiting a country of 66M people, Paris gets 14M+ visitors (approx 10M inhabitants).
In London we get close to 20M visitors.
Getting to the museums during holidays is a nightmare.
It puts a strain on the transport infrastructure, generates noise pollution over London (Heathrow path).

At the same time so many people rely on tourism for a living.
I don't see a solution to be honest.
 
Joined
Feb 4, 2006
Messages
483
Location
San Antonio, TX
I don't see much point in taking photos of things that have been done to excess and with easy availability on the net or in a coffee table book. National parks, bugs, car shows, live music shows, zoo captives...

Exceptions made for birds, dogs, barns, fields, flowers, old stuff that is weathering away, and skies. And some high contrast street shots.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Messages
6,455
Location
Annapolis
I think they have a good reason...the place (Antelope Canyon) is packed wall to wall with people. When someone sets up a tripod, the constant flow of the crowd is disrupted. When I visited, I paid a premium for the Photography Tour--which simply allowed me to use a tripod. The guide would block the flow of people for about 30 seconds...so I could get a few pictures now and then. Without the Photography Tour, the chances of getting a decent shot are remote. I understand the reasoning--but it basically takes photography out of the experience. I know they don't care, but I won't be visiting there again if I can't take pictures.

Yes...I do understand the reasoning. It's just a shame that these places have become so crowded that it has become necessary at times to ban tripods. I'll be leaving for Iceland soon--and I was shocked to receive an email from our photography guide about the ice caves. I initially paid $200 for the ice cave tour (along with four other in our group--so $1,000 in total for the small group). The guide said that the experience would not be ideal as the ice caves are so crowded now that it would be nearly impossible to get pictures. So, he suggested that we "reserve" the space--which requires hiking to the cave in the dark before sunrise and paying an additional $70 per person. Keep in mind that these ice caves are relatively remote--about 250 miles from Reykjavik and in the middle of the Winter! But, at least I can use my tripod!

Glenn
I got by without a tripod. Basically improvised with what was available which was a rope barrier slung between shovel handles. Works fine. The ice caves are very small inside. Only the miracle of 14 mm lenses makes them look impressive.
 
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Messages
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Location
Annapolis
I don't see much point in taking photos of things that have been done to excess and with easy availability on the net or in a coffee table book. National parks, bugs, car shows, live music shows, zoo captives...

Exceptions made for birds, dogs, barns, fields, flowers, and skies. And some high contrast street shots.
Someone else's memories aren't mine.
 
Joined
Jul 30, 2006
Messages
11,586
Location
Southern California
While I am not partial to crowds, esp. in NPs, I must admit, one of my favorite memories shooting an iconic location was about 6-7 years ago, one other photog and I showed up at Mesa Arch at about 4 in the morning to grab prime spots. By 5, a photo tour of around 15-20 people had arrived and set up camp. If you've ever shot there, you'll know that 5 is a crowd, and 20 is the like 405 during rush hour... yet, the whole morning was fun! We were meeting, bantering, trading spots, crossing tripod legs, and in general, helping everyone else get the shots they needed.

In contrast, later than night, that same photog and I who arrive early, had "hit it off" and met up at Delicate Arch for a night shoot... and had the place totally to ourselves... we light-painted to our hearts' content, and it was great! That was probably my single best day of photography, due in part to both ends of the spectrum, people-wise.

To speak to the crowds, let me be frank, and brief, and hopefully not overstep. I visit several national parks every year, generally during Christmas break and during the summer (me being a teacher and all). I must say that in my experience a majority of the overcrowdedness is due to foreigners coming to our wonderfully beautiful country and visiting our national parks. I'm not going to pass judgement except to say that a part of me feels that these are OUR parks, first and foremost... perhaps some ideas to consider and discuss, politely! in that...
 
Joined
Mar 20, 2017
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419
Location
Viera, Florida USA
Real Name
Steve
I'm near Orlando, theme-park capital of the world. My son's high school choir sang at an event at Disney over the holiday. I wanted to make a video for the family up north, but hate hand-holding a camera for videos 5 minutes long. I read online that Disney doesn't allow tripods, monopods or even selfie sticks (thank God), but there was a little crack in the door of that rule. If it fits in a standard backpack, it is allowed...
(from Restricted Personal Items | Walt Disney World Resort):

You may not bring the following types of items into the theme parks: (this is a partial list, the full list is at the link)
  • Tripod stands or monopod stands that cannot fit inside a standard backpack
  • Selfie sticks (hand-held extension poles for cameras and mobile devices)
So, I ordered one of the 5-section Manfroto monopods. It fits in a backpack easily, but extends to almost 6 feet. There are also mixture tripods that could fit in a backpack as well. IN the backpack, not tied to the side.

Point being, check their official statements. The people at the gates may say, "no," but there are specifics to their rules.
 
Joined
Nov 14, 2006
Messages
5,462
Location
Winnipeg, Canada
I'm near Orlando, sney doesn't allow tripods, monopods or even selfie sticks (thank God), but there was a little crack in the door of that rule. If it fits in a standard backpack, it is allowed...
(from Restricted Personal Items | Walt Disney World Resort):

You may not bring the following types of items into the theme parks: (this is a partial list, the full list is at the link)
  • Tripod stands or monopod stands that cannot fit inside a standard backpack
  • Selfie sticks (hand-held extension poles for cameras and mobile devices)


Point being, check their official statements. The people at the gates may say, "no," but there are specifics to their rules.
I wonder what their definition of "a standard backpack is"
 
Joined
Oct 17, 2007
Messages
24,245
Location
Orland Park, Illinois
While I am not partial to crowds, esp. in NPs, I must admit, one of my favorite memories shooting an iconic location was about 6-7 years ago, one other photog and I showed up at Mesa Arch at about 4 in the morning to grab prime spots. By 5, a photo tour of around 15-20 people had arrived and set up camp. If you've ever shot there, you'll know that 5 is a crowd, and 20 is the like 405 during rush hour... yet, the whole morning was fun! We were meeting, bantering, trading spots, crossing tripod legs, and in general, helping everyone else get the shots they needed.
Yes...I arrived at Mesa Arch at 4:00am (after driving from Moab that morning). I was the second person there. By the time sunrise was approaching, there were more than 30 photographers. However, only four or five of us were positioned for the best shots. Everyone was polite...and once we captured our images, we quickly moved to the back so that others could get there shots as well. I'll never forget the sound at the moment the sun came over the horizon. Tens of cameras shooting in rapid burst mode at the same time. It was like I was at a press conference...made me laugh.

Glenn
 
Joined
Oct 17, 2007
Messages
24,245
Location
Orland Park, Illinois
I'm near Orlando, theme-park capital of the world. My son's high school choir sang at an event at Disney over the holiday. I wanted to make a video for the family up north, but hate hand-holding a camera for videos 5 minutes long. I read online that Disney doesn't allow tripods, monopods or even selfie sticks (thank God), but there was a little crack in the door of that rule. If it fits in a standard backpack, it is allowed...
(from Restricted Personal Items | Walt Disney World Resort):

You may not bring the following types of items into the theme parks: (this is a partial list, the full list is at the link)
  • Tripod stands or monopod stands that cannot fit inside a standard backpack
  • Selfie sticks (hand-held extension poles for cameras and mobile devices)
So, I ordered one of the 5-section Manfroto monopods. It fits in a backpack easily, but extends to almost 6 feet. There are also mixture tripods that could fit in a backpack as well. IN the backpack, not tied to the side.

Point being, check their official statements. The people at the gates may say, "no," but there are specifics to their rules.
It's been a long time since I visited, but back then I carried a full sized tripod and my 300 VR into Disney without an issue. I'm sorry to hear that the policy has changed.

Glenn
 

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