A few corporate headshots...

I tried out my brand new Einstein strobes this morning while capturing a few corporate headshots. One strobe was positioned camera left in a large softbox and the other was positioned to light the background. I used a piece of white foamboard to provide the fill.

The exposure was f/8 from the key light at ISO 200. The foamboard provided an exposure of f/5.6 and the background was lit at f/11. All images were captured using the D700 and 70-200 VR2:

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Any suggestions for improvement will be greatly appreciated. I plan to add a hairlight next time.

Thanks,
Glenn
 
They look a little too softened to me. Otherwise, they look great. Your lighting, the posing angle, etc. All very, very good, Glenn!
 
are you using any skin smoothing?

there is this glow to them, as if they all just got lucky or something

lol
 
They look a little too softened to me. Otherwise, they look great. Your lighting, the posing angle, etc. All very, very good, Glenn!
Thanks...

I'll need to reduce the opacity of my skin softening layer. I was trying to be sensitive to the concern the subjects had about how their skin would appear in the photos.

Glenn
 
The lighting is spot on. I didn't mind the small lack of sharpness, alhtough if shooting off a tripod, they could be sharper. I am not a fan of the color of the BG, however. It seems too distracting and not quite "corporate" or business"y" enough. :smile: AND, be careful of the angle you put glasses wearers! See #2... the right (our left) side of his face is compeltely distorted though his glasses and doesn't match up with the rest of his head. Very awkward looking! :eek: :smile: Less straight on an more angle should make this better.
 
The lighting is spot on. I didn't mind the small lack of sharpness, alhtough if shooting off a tripod, they could be sharper. I am not a fan of the color of the BG, however. It seems too distracting and not quite "corporate" or business"y" enough. :smile: AND, be careful of the angle you put glasses wearers! See #2... the right (our left) side of his face is compeltely distorted though his glasses and doesn't match up with the rest of his head. Very awkward looking! :eek: :smile: Less straight on an more angle should make this better.
Thanks Shaun...

Before the skin softening in Photoshop, the images were far too sharp. I did shoot off a tripod. I agree with your point about the background. The seamless paper was a darker green--and that was probably suitable. But, I lit the background a stop brighter than the key light--which changed the tone of the green to something less "corporate".

I see what you mean about the glasses. Three individuals wore glasses. Two of the three presented a problem. One was wearing transitions--and his glasses were darkening with the flash. The glasses of one of the other subjects kept glaring--and I finally had to have him tilt his head in an awkward position. Finally, the one with transitions I had to process in B&W as the glasses appeared to throw green light!

Glenn
 
Glasses are aweful to deal with in regards to studio lighting. The first thing I do is ask if they feel comfortable with their picture taken sans the glasses. There are ways to tilt the head up of down to avoid much/most of the glare, but yes, those transition glasses give off a downright putrid greenish color! As for the head problem in shot #2, I don't know if it can be totally eliminated, but it certainly can be minimized by having the subject look a little more to his right (his nose, but not his eyes).
 
I took some organizational portraits two months ago and about a third of the subjects wore glasses, some with very thick lenses. I brought five pairs of old frames, with no lenses, for them to choose from. Without the lenses, there is no distortion, and so far no one viewing the images has commented on the different frames.
 
Glasses are aweful to deal with in regards to studio lighting. The first thing I do is ask if they feel comfortable with their picture taken sans the glasses. There are ways to tilt the head up of down to avoid much/most of the glare, but yes, those transition glasses give off a downright putrid greenish color! As for the head problem in shot #2, I don't know if it can be totally eliminated, but it certainly can be minimized by having the subject look a little more to his right (his nose, but not his eyes).
Yes...with #2 there was certainly an opportunity to have him shift his head a little to eliminate that distortion. Of course, I didn't see it until well after the fact. But, practice makes perfect.

Glenn
 
I took some organizational portraits two months ago and about a third of the subjects wore glasses, some with very thick lenses. I brought five pairs of old frames, with no lenses, for them to choose from. Without the lenses, there is no distortion, and so far no one viewing the images has commented on the different frames.
Mike,

Thanks for the great idea! I should have thought of it before...

Glenn
 
Yes...with #2 there was certainly an opportunity to have him shift his head a little to eliminate that distortion. Of course, I didn't see it until well after the fact. But, practice makes perfect.

Glenn
Glenn, I know this to be a problem and I still tend to forget about it!!! :rolleyes:

I took some organizational portraits two months ago and about a third of the subjects wore glasses, some with very thick lenses. I brought five pairs of old frames, with no lenses, for them to choose from. Without the lenses, there is no distortion, and so far no one viewing the images has commented on the different frames.
Ditto that this is agreat idea! I'm going to visit the nearest 99 cent store for a couple of cheap pairs!!!
 
I took some organizational portraits two months ago and about a third of the subjects wore glasses, some with very thick lenses. I brought five pairs of old frames, with no lenses, for them to choose from. Without the lenses, there is no distortion, and so far no one viewing the images has commented on the different frames.
I have been going crazy with glasses and this is a great idea. Thanks.....
 
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