A few 'urban' sites in Glasgow, Scotland

Joined
May 7, 2007
Messages
404
Location
Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Doulton Fountain

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Some background:

http://www.victorianweb.org/sculpture/fountains/3.html

Designer: Arthur Edward Pearce. Sculptors: John Broad, Herbert Ellis, Pearce himself, Frederick Pomeroy and William Silver Frith, and possibly student assistants (supervised by Frith). 1888. Terracotta on an iron frame. Glasgow Green, Glasgow. Text Jacqueline Banerjee.

This highly decorative five-tier fountain in French Renaissance style was designed to commemorate the Queen's Golden Jubilee in 1887, and became Doulton's main display piece for the 1888 International Exhibition in Kelvingrove Park, Glasgow. It now stands in front of the equally ornate People's Palace, which houses the city's social history collection. The fountain was extensively restored in 2003-5. At 46' high and 70' across at the base, it is thought to be the largest such fountain in the world.

It was an extremely popular work, much praised as "an alliance of the beautiful and the useful" (qtd. in McKenzie 169), partly no doubt because of its symbolic role as a celebration of empire. Below the crowning figure of the Queen by John Broad are four kneeling maidens emptying pitchers, and beneath them are sentries representing Scottish, English and Irish regiments, along with a sailor representing the Royal Navy. Below these are four allegorical groups representing Canada (modelled by Frith), South Africa (modelled by Ellis), Australia (modelled by Pomeroy) and India (modelled by Broad). In the closer view, a Black Watch Highlander can be seen among the servicemen, while India is visible on the right, and Canada on the left. India is represented by an armed figure with a turban, indicating its military history, and a female figure with accoutrements suggesting its arts and industries; Canada has a trapper with a moose's head, and a woman with objects such as a sheaf of wheat and a miner's pick, indicating agricultural and mineral resources. There is a beaver at the righthand corner, by the trapper's foot.

There was great interest in the use of terracotta for such a big project. Its virtues are that it can be worked quickly and delicately, and is weather resistant. In our own times, the art critic Brian Sewell has written lyrically about it as "a material with weight and texture to it, comforting to the hand, reassuring to the eye in its variety of ruddy and russet colours," and a means of insight "into the sculptor's mind and eye." However, it does have a drawback. When the figure of Queen Victoria on the Doulton Fountain was hit by lightning in 1894, replacement was less straightforward than it would have been if a cast had been available.


For me personally I actually find the notion of the statue (a celebration of the Empire) and this its final resting place quite ironic. Not yards from this current site in 1887 at St Marys Church Hall, Calton, a number of men including Andrew Kerrins and John Glass were meeting:

http://www.kerrydalestreet.com

Celtic Football Club was formally constituted at a meeting in St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church hall on East Rose Street (now Forbes Street), Calton, Glasgow, by a Marist Brother named Brother Walfrid (Andrew Kerrins) on 6 November 1887.

The charity established by Brother Walfrid was named The Poor Children's Dinner Table.Brother Walfrid's move to establish the club as a means of fund raising was largely inspired by the example of Hibernian F.C. who were formed out of the immigrant Irish population a few years earlier in Edinburgh.

On 28 May 1888, Celtic played their first official match against a Rangers XI (dubbed "the Swifts") and Celtic won 5-2 in what was described as a "friendly encounter"

In a perfect world Celtic would never have been formed. Why? Because in a perfect world there would be no poverty. There would be no squalor. In a perfect world people would offer charity without expecting the recipient to renounce their faith. Glasgow in the 1880s was far from a perfect world.

Sligo-born Brother Walfrid created Celtic to aid an impoverished community. A community often shunned because of their faith and nationality. He was driven by a desire to not just save them from poverty but to help them retain their dignity. Through the Poor Children’s Dinner Table and Celtic FC he wanted to put food in the belly and pride in the heart. That’s not romantic revisionism, that’s the reality behind Celtic.


The club’s rapid success on the pitch would see it quickly steer away from these original off-field aspirations. Today such honourable intentions are, bar few exceptions, almost alien to a world of football more concerned with multi-million pound transfers, sponsorship deals, executive boxes and merchandising.

Yet these roots remain a source of great pride for Celtic supporters’. While the club is now ‘owned’ by shareholders, charity and community will always remain at the very heart of the club.



The Tradeston Bridge, Glasgow

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Glasgow University

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Grangemouth Oil Refinery (6 image Pano cropped)

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The Mitchell Library (at Blue-hour) (Nikon D700 | Nikkor AF-S 24-70mm f2.8 @ 28mm | f16 | ISO200 | 11 exposures @ 10 secs each (hand blended in CS4)| Lee Pro-Glass 0.6 ND

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Heavy Horse (sculpture at side of motorway)

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IMAX Cinema (Nikon D700 | Nikkor AF-S 14-24mm f2.8 @ 15mm | f20 | ISO200 | 46 secs & 3 secs. manually blended)

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IMAX Cinema (Nikon D700 | Nikkor AF-S 14-24mm f2.8 @ 16mm | f18 | ISO100 | 100 secs)

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Apologies for the black frames, I know they are not to everyones (anyones) taste, but I like 'em ! Thanks for looking. :biggrin:
 
Joined
Jan 4, 2010
Messages
524
Location
Kent, England
Stunning, stunning set and right up my street (metaphorically :wink:).

Obviously a combination of the right time, the right place, the right and equipment and ... the right photographer :cool:!

Thanks for sharing.
 
Joined
Jan 8, 2007
Messages
188
Location
NC
Wow, these look great! I am constantly being blown away by the images people are turning out with the d700. Very nice.
 
Joined
May 7, 2007
Messages
404
Location
Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Thanks all sincerely for the very kind words, they are MUCH appreciated.

Brian, the 'green screen' is actually just glass with some coloured lights behind it which change. This was the 3 sec exposure which I blended into the longer exposure. The orange sky is light pollution realised by the long exp.

Robert I love the D700, I couldn't recommend it highly enough, combined with some good glass its hard to beat IMO.

Tony, I do have Topaz but rarely use it. I do like to 'push' my urban stuff that wee bit but prefer to do this with a new Lucis Art layer often using the sculpture filter with the opacity set very very low.

Again thanks to all, im glad i can show you some of the better sides of my home city.
 

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