A walk in the forest--a turtle's eye view

Discussion in 'Macro, Flowers, Insects, and Greenery' started by Jerry Snider, Oct 15, 2005.

  1. Jerry Snider

    Jerry Snider

    390
    May 8, 2005
    Some rather mundane fungi snapshots from a recent autumn walk in the woods--taken from a turtle's eye view. Normally I don't i.d. mushrooms for folks for health reasons, but fortunately you can't eat pictures--and even if you do it won't be the mushroom that makes you ill!! Correct any identifications you desire.

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  2. Sharp, detailed, well exposed and composed, good colors. Jerry, could you give me some lessons how to get such snapshots of quality? :cool:.
     
  3. Most excellent mushroom shots Jerry!! Was that ambient light or did you use a flash?

    As for the IDs - they are spot on. I am not so sure of the Russula though. They usually have much more narrowly spaced lamellae and without shorter intermediate lamellae. I am not exactly sure where it belongs but I would look for it among the Waxy Caps (Hygrophorus), at least they have the characteristic lamellae as shown in your specimens.

    I particularly like the Crucibulum, I never saw them in nature.

    Cheers
     
  4. Gale

    Gale

    978
    Jan 26, 2005
    Viera Fl
    Excellent images all of them.

    The birds nest mushroom is quite unique.

    Thanks for sharing and I promise not to eat my monitor or stir fry it up with some onions and garlic to go with the big jucie steak .....lololol
     
  5. Jerry Snider

    Jerry Snider

    390
    May 8, 2005
    One thing you DON'T need, Dao, is a photography lesson! You do quite well. I do appreciate the comments however. You are too kind!
     
  6. Jerry Snider

    Jerry Snider

    390
    May 8, 2005
    Harry, thanks for the comments. Haven't worked on mushrooms for several years now and I really WAS working hard to push the one into "Russula". Thanks for pointing out the gill spacing. Seriously considered the waxy caps but this one seemed awfully large, was not slick or sticky, etc. I even went back to the site yesterday to restudy, photograph it again, but for the life of me I couldn't find the location--must be an age (mine) problem!! I'm certain that you are correct in your recommendation. Indeed, you should have screamed, "DUMMY, that is not a Russula!!" May go into the herbarium next week and check out the collection. (Although I am still listed as curator, I don't know if they will even let me into the building now that I am retired).

    All of the photos were taken under ambient light in the 1/2 sec range. I prefer it for things that stand VERY still. I do use flash heavily for bugs however.
    The Bird's Nest fungi rank among my favorites and I find them rather frequently. This particular group was growing on a wild grape vine. My college students were always amazed when in lab they would attempt to "splash" the peridioles from the cups and discover that it actually works, "anchor" "rope" and the whole bit!
    Thanks again for the input.
     
  7. Jerry Snider

    Jerry Snider

    390
    May 8, 2005
    Thanks, Gale. Most were taken quickly and w/o thinking too much.
    Re the bird's nest fungus, think of each "egg" as being a minature puffball mushroom. Now what you do is remove each tiny egg when it is just formed, slice it paper thin, sautee the slices in butter and you have a real delicacy! :biggrin: Yeah, right!! (The puffball comparison is more or less correct, however).
     
  8. Gale

    Gale

    978
    Jan 26, 2005
    Viera Fl
    lolol Jerry :>))))))
     
  9. BigPixel

    BigPixel Guest

    Great eye! Nice editing.
     
  10. Jerry Snider

    Jerry Snider

    390
    May 8, 2005
    Thanks for looking, HulaMike.
     
  11. sure glad that I took the time to look at this thread. very nicely done in all respects.
    Dave
     
  12. Jerry Snider

    Jerry Snider

    390
    May 8, 2005
    Thanks Dave. Always appreciate you taking the time to view my stuff. We seem to have similar subject interests and your input is always valued.
     
  13. Beautifully done.
     
  14. Jerry Snider

    Jerry Snider

    390
    May 8, 2005
    Thanks Rory. Just checked the new pics on your site and they are extremely well done. Nice job. Especially love the series of autumn leaf photos--so crisp, colorful, yet subtle. Really nice. The Letharia vulpina lichen photo (wolf lichen) is really nice also, although I am basing my i.d. only on color and habitat and not a closeup view of the morphology. I could easily be wrong here.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 16, 2005
  15. Leigh

    Leigh

    Feb 19, 2005
    Alabama
    I love Mushrooms....but nothing from the wild....I'm just too darn scared I'll be poisoned to death! I'll stick to eating the ones from the market!

    Your photos are beautiful as always....and thanks for the lesson in which 'shrooms ar which!
     
  16. I couldn't find the mundane ones you were talking about but these are just fantastic, your going to have to share your lighting secrets on these.

    Martin
     
  17. Jerry Snider

    Jerry Snider

    390
    May 8, 2005
    Thanks for the input, Martin. All of these were taken under ambient light conditions, no flash used. No secrets here, just a lot of luck and exposure times in the 1/2 sec range or thereabouts, tripod mounted. Couldn't get down quite to turtle eye level as I wanted due to having the leveling apparatus attached. Am going to have to rededicate a tripod strictly for the low growing stuff--mosses, mushrooms, etc. Mundane simply because all of the mushrooms were cream to whitish. No colorful ones discovered. Colors bumped and photos sharpened in L*A*B just to see what might result. Of course, I had absolutely NO idea as to what I was doing (as is usually the case).
     
  18. Jerry Snider

    Jerry Snider

    390
    May 8, 2005
    Leigh, thanks for taking the time to look at these. Always appreciate your comments and insight.
     
  19. Jerry great pictures, i like the last ones, i never encounter any of those. Low angle picture taking is a lot of pain trying to put yourself in funny positions to try to make the focus.
     
  20. Jerry Snider

    Jerry Snider

    390
    May 8, 2005
    Gilles,
    Thanks for the comments. Years ago I attempted to use a right angle viewfinder but wasn't comfortable with it. Much prefer to get my knees/shirt dirty laying on the ground.
    Actually, bird's nest fungi are rather common on hardwood mulch along prepared hiking trails, and homes that use hardwood mulch in their landscaping. They are quite tiny, however. Just the other day I was reeling up my garden hose behind my house and happened to look down and saw perhaps 200 or so in a square meter area of mulch. They were in pretty bad shape so didn't take the time to look at them closely as the habitat didn't lend itself for a decent photograph.
     
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