Another Dumb Question

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If I open up 4 stops, then is it ƒ2.8 or ƒ4? :blackeye:
Or 1/250 or 1/500?

Trying to shoot ISO 1.6 film
The guide says that if you can't set at ISO 1.6, then set to ASA 25 and "open up 4 stops" - Would this be shutter speed stops or aperture stops?
Sorry if this this already said.
You can tell your camera to overexpose by 4 stops if it goes that high. Easy as pie.
 
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You can tell your camera to overexpose by 4 stops if it goes that high. Easy as pie.
We don't even know if his camera can be set to automatically overexpose; it may have only fully manual exposure settings. I assume, perhaps wrongly, that he wouldn't have been asking these questions if his camera has the automated capability of making the compensation.
 
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If I open up 4 stops, then is it ƒ2.8 or ƒ4? :blackeye:
Or 1/250 or 1/500?

Trying to shoot ISO 1.6 film
The guide says that if you can't set at ISO 1.6, then set to ASA 25 and "open up 4 stops" - Would this be shutter speed stops or aperture stops?
If I open up 4 stops, then is it ƒ2.8 or ƒ4? :blackeye:
Or 1/250 or 1/500?

Trying to shoot ISO 1.6 film
The guide says that if you can't set at ISO 1.6, then set to ASA 25 and "open up 4 stops" - Would this be shutter speed stops or aperture stops?
What camera are you using?
 
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What camera are you using?
We don't even know if his camera can be set to automatically overexpose; it may have only fully manual exposure settings. I assume, perhaps wrongly, that he wouldn't have been asking these questions if his camera has the automated capability of making the compensation.
Hey folks!
I'm shooting with an Olympus 35SP - here are the details.

ASA: 25-800
Aperture: 1.7, 2.8, 4, 5.6, 8,11,16
Shutter Speed: 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500
 
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The Olympus 35SP has only two exposure modes -- Program (which is of no use in this situation) and Manual (which is of perfect use).

The following is an excellent tip from Ken Rockwell that could be very helpful:

"Manual Exposure
Set the aperture and shutter speeds the old fashioned way, or use the EVS, Exposure Value System.
To use the EVS, simply turn either ring until the number seen through the window on the rings is the same as read in the finder.
Here's the wow part: once set, hold and turn both rings together, and all of these combinations of shutter and aperture are all correct!
If you'd rather use an external meter or a light meter app on your iPhone, you can set exposure either the old fashioned way (shutter and aperture), or just read the EV directly from the meter if you can, and use that."

https://www.kenrockwell.com/olympus/35-sp.htm
 
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The Olympus 35SP has only two exposure modes -- Program (which is of no use in this situation) and Manual (which is of perfect use).

The following is an excellent tip from Ken Rockwell that could be very helpful:

"Manual Exposure
Set the aperture and shutter speeds the old fashioned way, or use the EVS, Exposure Value System.
To use the EVS, simply turn either ring until the number seen through the window on the rings is the same as read in the finder.
Here's the wow part: once set, hold and turn both rings together, and all of these combinations of shutter and aperture are all correct!
If you'd rather use an external meter or a light meter app on your iPhone, you can set exposure either the old fashioned way (shutter and aperture), or just read the EV directly from the meter if you can, and use that."

https://www.kenrockwell.com/olympus/35-sp.htm
Yeppers! - I shoot in manual mode only on it thus far.
The manual doesn't quite say it like Ken has - but essentially, Ken is correct.

I'd copy & paste from the manual but I only have a printed copy of it....
 
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The Olympus 35SP has only two exposure modes -- Program (which is of no use in this situation) and Manual (which is of perfect use).

The following is an excellent tip from Ken Rockwell that could be very helpful:

"Manual Exposure
Set the aperture and shutter speeds the old fashioned way, or use the EVS, Exposure Value System.
To use the EVS, simply turn either ring until the number seen through the window on the rings is the same as read in the finder.
Here's the wow part: once set, hold and turn both rings together, and all of these combinations of shutter and aperture are all correct!
If you'd rather use an external meter or a light meter app on your iPhone, you can set exposure either the old fashioned way (shutter and aperture), or just read the EV directly from the meter if you can, and use that."

https://www.kenrockwell.com/olympus/35-sp.htm
Okay here's how it's worded in the manual"

"When you wish to selves a combination of the shutter speed with the F/Stop to determine exposure......

1) Shutter speed must be determined first to meet various factors of the subject. With the camera facing the subject, read the EV value on the scale. Turn the F/stop ring until you find the same EV value through the small window of the shutter speed ring"
:)
 
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So I've taken a few shots now...
(THANK YOU EVERYONE FOR YOUR INFORMATION AND ADVICE!!) :shame:

And I tell you what, a very narrow window of shooting....I didn't want to go below 1/60th shutter speed so I needed light, light, light!!
I would guess that shooting with 1 cloud blocking the sun would require 1/30th shutter speed at full wide open aperture (ƒ1.7 for my camera)

About 20 more exposures left! :confused::wideyed:
 

Growltiger

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Here is a snip from one of those old Kodak leaflets that came with each film.
Ignore the actual settings such as the shutter speed (because they relate to a specific film) but read the description and simply note that each row down needs one more stop of exposure compared to the row above.
So who needs an exposure meter when they have a leaflet?
1588370772792.png
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Teaching a five-year-old:

Stuck in her camera case is a label with the numbers from one of those film leaflets.

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(The label enabled her to drive her camera by herself so that I could concentrate on my own work without constant interruption!)

I think that Richard's leaflet came from a UK package because it is a "Sunny f/11 Rule" in those northern climes.
 
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My hunch is that you'll never use a polarizer filter when shooting with that film. :)
And I won't use a ND filter either! :wideyed:

LoL actually in all seriousness, I've used polarizers before - we'll see what happens with this first roll though!
I'm trying to brace myself for many "photographer error" shots....:smuggrin:
 
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If you like using long time-exposures to obtain milky waterfalls and smoothed-out oceans, this could be the perfect film.
 

Growltiger

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I think that Richard's leaflet came from a UK package because it is a "Sunny f/11 Rule" in those northern climes.
No, it was still the sunny 16 rule - that film was ISO 125. The second row down would be 1/125 at f/16. But the snow/sand row at the top would have been f/22 at 1/125 and I think they avoided recommending that as some cameras didn't go to f/22.

I remember visiting the print department at Kodak North Harrow factory when I wanted something printed (I worked there, in IT). They had huge piles of leaflets all over the place, all on that very thin paper.
 

Growltiger

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That would have been a cool photo, though they probably wouldn't have let you take it.
A colleague had a Leica M4 and I had a Nikon F2A. We went up on the roof of one of the buildings and took photos to compare. Various prime lenses of that era (1970s). The Leica did much better than the Nikon, and at full aperture this was particularly obvious. Of course his Leica lenses were far more expensive.

One benefit was the staff shop. I remember getting very cheap rolls of Kodachrome which they had cut a bit too short, so I only got 35 photos per roll instead of the normal 37 or 38 one could squeeze out of them.

The factory made film and paper. It was an amazing place. The worst working conditions were in the colour film cutting, where men would work in very loud noise, in almost complete darkness, each one monitoring several machines and reloading them just by feel. In winter they only saw daylight at weekends. They were well paid for that work, but when I went in there I found it intolerable.

One of my colleagues when visiting the paper production area, which was very dimly lit with red light, was pounced on in a dark corridor by a group of women who all kissed him. I was never lucky.
 
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I was in the happy position of having a Direct Account with Kodak so a phone call resulted in a next-day delivery of very fresh supplies of sensitive materials and processing chemicals (with their accompanying leaflets on that thin paper!) from Kodak's factory directly to my door in the hamlet of Chicksgrove in deepest Wiltshire — at wholesale VAT-free prices.

I always shot negative film and found that it produced better prints with "Sunny 11" than with "Sunny 16" in England.
 

Growltiger

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I was in the happy position of having a Direct Account with Kodak so a phone call resulted in a next-day delivery of very fresh supplies of sensitive materials and processing chemicals (with their accompanying leaflets on that thin paper!) from Kodak's factory directly to my door in the hamlet of Chicksgrove in deepest Wiltshire — at wholesale VAT-free prices.

I always shot negative film and found that it produced better prints with "Sunny 11" than with "Sunny 16" in England.
Yes indeed, and negative film has a huge dynamic range which helps a lot.

Unlike slides, where Kodachrome which I mostly used, really needed to be accurate to 1/3 of a stop. I got to be very good at knowing exposures at a glance.
 
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[slides] really needed to be accurate to 1/3 of a stop. I got to be very good at knowing exposures at a glance.
Years ago a friend (now deceased) used only a 50mm lens on his 35mm film camera. It didn't have a built-in meter and he never used an external meter. He always shot slide film. I saw thousands of his slides and remember getting really excited upon viewing the one image that was not properly exposed. I told him I thought that day would never happen. It never happened again.

I always used the meter built into my camera. Yet I almost always took three exposures just to make sure one of them had likely nailed the exposure.
 

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