Any GIMP Users here?

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Looking at the subscription based pricing of adobe products I started learning GIMP. I am following Davis Media design tutorial on Udemy. Is there any other resource on learning GIMP?

I am honestly struggling with focus and exposure stacking because no matter what I do, my end result has halo in it.

also, most online photography courses only tech photoshop based post processing techniques. is there a teacher who includes GIMP in their workflow?
 
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GIMP doesn't do focus stacking, does it? Maybe 2.8 does, but I stuck with 2.6. Exposure hacking, or HDR,... haloing is a natural by-product of the process. There's other apps that do both, and HDR better than GIMP.
 

Butlerkid

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......

I am honestly struggling with focus and exposure stacking because no matter what I do, my end result has halo in it.
.....
Focus and exposure need to be done IN CAMERA. You need to master basic photographic principles before worrying about software. IMHO...................
 
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Yes and after taking multiple pictures which have focus on different things you can combine them for stunning effects. just today I saw a macro where someone focussed on watch parts using a Marco lens and then combined multiples images into a stunning picture of a watch.

I think that gears macro was on this site but now I can't find it... otherwise I would have posted it here.
 
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No now I cannot find it anywhere. it was a set of watch gears laid in a circle and then the photographer shot them in focus individually and then created a merged image.
 
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Focus stacking involves two processes.

The first process is focus bracketing, which is capturing a series of images of the same subject with each image being captured using a focus distance that is progressively farther away from the lens than the previous image. That can be done manually (though I've never tried it) or it can be done automatically if the camera has that capability or using external hardware connected to the camera if it does not.

The second process is focus stacking, which usually involves using external software to merge the focus-bracketed photos. Some Olympus cameras do the focus-stacking in-camera, but I don't know of any other camera models that have that capability.

A lot of people and device manufacturers use the term, focus stacking, incorrectly to describe the process that is actually called focus bracketing. So, be aware of that to help avoid confusion.

Consider reviewing the following long thread for perhaps more than you want to know about focus stacking and focus bracketing:
https://www.nikoncafe.com/threads/sensor-size-and-focus-stacking-lots-about-focus-stacking.320241/

the photographer shot them in focus individually and then created a merged image.
I would have to see the photo or the photographer's explanation of how it was created. Based only on your description, that would be neither focus bracketing nor focus stacking. Imagine taking portraits, one each for every member of your family, and then merging those portraits into one image. That might be the process the photographer used. However, the photographer might have combined two processes: making focus-stacked images of each watch gear and then combining each of those images into one image.
 
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Focus stacking involves two processes.

The first process is focus bracketing, which is capturing a series of images of the same subject with each image being captured using a focus distance that is progressively farther away from the lens than the previous image. That can be done manually (though I've never tried it) or it can be done automatically if the camera has that capability or using external hardware connected to the camera if it does not.

The second process is focus stacking, which usually involves using external software to merge the focus-bracketed photos. Some Olympus cameras do the focus-stacking in-camera, but I don't know of any other camera models that have that capability.

A lot of people and device manufacturers use the term, focus stacking, incorrectly to describe the process that is actually called focus bracketing. So, be aware of that to help avoid confusion.

Consider reviewing the following long thread for perhaps more than you want to know about focus stacking and focus bracketing:
https://www.nikoncafe.com/threads/sensor-size-and-focus-stacking-lots-about-focus-stacking.320241/



I would have to see the photo or the photographer's explanation of how it was created. Based only on your description, that would be neither focus bracketing nor focus stacking. Imagine taking portraits, one each for every member of your family, and then merging those portraits into one image. That might be the process the photographer used. However, the photographer might have combined two processes: making focus-stacked images of each watch gear and then combining each of those images into one image.
Thank you so much for your response. Sorry I had missed it earlier so was slow in responding. Yes I will go through the thread you provided here.
 

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