Any one tried StackShot?

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I have a StackShot and use it on conjunction with a CamRanger and an iPad.
It allows you to use minute steps and set the range very accurately.
CamRanger alone can focus-stack but not with the fineness of control which StackShot provides.
You will particularly appreciate the difference if you shoot microscopic objects.
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Jaws of a Wasp
 
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Wicked, very nice pic. My only thought is it would be really bad if these things got scaled up 2 or 3, 100 times. :)
 
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Here is his hairy face and eyes;
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and the Bee's Knees too!
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I have a 10x microscope objective lens which I can mount on my camera (with an adapter) so several 100x magnification at print-size is very possible!
 
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He had no choice in his current state: he was "deceased"!
Fortunately for me when working at such close range because they carry a very powerful stinger at the other end
 
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Good software is the other part of successful Focus Stacking.
I evaluated several different packages and decided that Zerene Stacker was the easiest to use and produced the best results.
 
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I have a Stackshot, and also use it in conjunction with a CamRanger.

Depending on what you are intending to photograph, you might get away with using something like the CamRanger, or a body with the function inbuilt. I create hundreds of focus stacks each year, mostly of fungi and native orchids. The CamRanger has served me well over the years, but for the majority of the focus stacks these days I use bodies with the functionality inbuilt. Although I have a few bodies Nikon, Fuji, and Olympus with the functionality, the one I tend to use the most is the Olympus. Trying to understand the step size, particularly with small subjects can be frustrating since you don't get to see the results (unless of course you utilise the stacking functionality built into the Olympus) until you process them on a computer. I find the Olympus gives me reasonably consistent results in the field, the CamRanger also gave me similar results. The bodies with the functionality built in utilise the electronic shutter, which makes the process very quick, compared to using a StacksShot and/or CamRanger.
Although you can use the StackShot in the field if you purchase the battery, it IMO, is not really suited for taking a lot of stacks. The bodies with the inbuilt functionality are by far the most versatile.

Here are a couple of my focus stacks

#1 90 image stack of a coffee bean
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#2 20 image focus stack of an Orchid
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Here are some sample shots showing how I use the CamRanger in the field.

Using a tablet allows me to stay on my feet, its also particularly handy when in leech infested territory as it minimises my exposure to them :) Not so fortunate for the camera and tripod.

Some cameras come with great apps for remote control so for me the CamRanger is being used less and less in the field. Buts its handy if using a Nikon or Canon body with just the basics.


#1 I place the camera in roughly the right location, then make adjustments to its position for composition while viewing the image on the tablet. On many occasions the camera is inverted on the tripod so I can get the lens closer to the ground. This is purely based on the subject and its location.
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#2 Standing back, I then make the necessary adjustments and hit the start button.
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#3 At home I process the stack.
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I can't quite see but it looks as if you may be using the electric motor-controlled pan-tilt tripod head which CamRanger also sells?

It's a very useful device when you have the camera in an awkward position because you can also drive and position the head very precisely by remote control through the CamRanger.
 
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I can't quite see but it looks as if you may be using the electric motor-controlled pan-tilt tripod head which CamRanger also sells?

It's a very useful device when you have the camera in an awkward position because you can also drive and position the head very precisely by remote control through the CamRanger.
Although I do have the remote controlled head, it tends to add too much height for fungi and native orchids. The above set of images was put together for a presentation I did a few years back. I generally use a smaller tripod with a slightly lower profile ball head, which also works well inverted. Although sometimes a full height tripod is required for some fungi.

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