Anzac biscuits

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Sep 13, 2007
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According to Cook's Illustrated, it's probably not possible to know when Anzac biscuits were first made. Even so, it's apparently very well documented that biscuits were regularly shipped to the Anzacs, so-named because the men were members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, which was first formed as part of the Gallipoli campaign of World War I. That campaign became so famous that people commonly began calling the sweets Anzac biscuits. It's apparently bad etiquette to call them cookies even though they really are in that category.

Setup
A very simple setup: A flashlight in the right front corner grazed light across the biscuits to create long shadows on the parchment paper and to emphasize the texture in the biscuits. A small continuous-light lamp above the flashlight brightened the shadows on the parchment paper. Almost all food photography makes use of very soft shadows, but I wanted the edgy look produced by hard shadows (highly defined shadows) that in my mind nicely complements the noticeable texture in the biscuits.

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Maurie Hill
My dear Mike: Point of order.
In New Zealand these Anzac biscuits are a staple and have been since 1915. In the civilised world these are Biscuits - and what you Americans call biscuits, we call scones. Our friends across the Tasman Sea also call them biscuits. We colonials faithfully follow the English, who refined the Roman delicacy into an artform (in their own opinion, of course). The term biscuit comes from the Latin meaning 'twice baked', and therefore a biscuit is much firmer, crunchier than an American cookie. A biscuit is usually smaller; often contains nuts and/or currents. And of course the piece d'resistance is when two biscuits are pressed together with a sweet filling, or it could be topped with icing or chocolate. On the other hand your 'biscuit' is a scone. Which we in the civilised world eat with butter, strawberry jam, and clotted cream ..... and always a cup of tea. Insert smiley face here.
 
Joined
Feb 4, 2006
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On a Big Island Down Under...
Love ANZAC Biscuits, been eating them since I was knee-high to a grasshopper...
One of the best tasting biscuits made, just sweet enough, but not too sweet...!!! 😋

As for the terminology,
Australian US
Biscuits = Cookies
Crackers = Biscuits
Scones = Scones
Jam = Jelly
And to us, Jelly is something mixed with water to form gelatin, a semi-solid liquid. I think Americans call it Jello...
Hope this helps some of our American friends understand the difference in the description of Biscuits etc. 🤔
 
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Anyone really interested in the history of Anzac biscuits should consider reading the following book released in 2018: https://smile.amazon.com/Anzac-Bisc...rds=anzac+biscuits+book&qid=1627819871&sr=8-1 According to Cook's Illustrated, the author says the Anzac biscuits made mostly like those of today made with oats, golden syrup and coconut probably didn't come to be until about 1920.
 
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Moscow, Idaho
My mother, being British, and me growing up in British India, made certain that we knew all about the differences berween biscuits, cookies, jelly, flapjacks/pancakes/crepes, etc., etc. I make sure my wife (Norwegian American) and our kids—pure Idaho spud-butts, get to eat all of the above, plus bubble and squeak, toad in the hole, mince on toast, liver on toast, steak and kidney pie, figgy pudding, treacle tart, etc., etc., etc. Culture is too important to forget or mess up, especially when it is food and drink!
 
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have to say looking at the original photo, that the Anzac biscuits were cooked at either at too high a temperature, or were left in the oven a little too long. Never mind, I would still eat them.

Just in case you're not familiar with Cook's Illustrated recipes, each chef that designs a particular recipe explains the science behind why the recipe works the way it does and why it didn't work the way it was originally tried. It also explains how the details of science are used to achieve very specific goals. Some recipes are tweaked over 50 times before the desired results are achieved and the recipe is deemed ready for publication. In this case, the chef wanted biscuits that are "crisp at the edges and chewy within; boast robust caramel-like richness, loads of oats, and lots of nutty-sweet coconut; and come together in a whim." This is my first batch made from the recipe and the biscuits definitely have all those characteristics.

My guess is that that description is different from how you would describe your favorite Anzac biscuits. Am I right?
 
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Otaki Beach, New Zealand
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Philip Armitage
Just in case you're not familiar with Cook's Illustrated recipes, each chef that designs a particular recipe explains the science behind why the recipe works the way it does and why it didn't work the way it was originally tried. It also explains how the details of science are used to achieve very specific goals. Some recipes are tweaked over 50 times before the desired results are achieved and the recipe is deemed ready for publication. In this case, the chef wanted biscuits that are "crisp at the edges and chewy within; boast robust caramel-like richness, loads of oats, and lots of nutty-sweet coconut; and come together in a whim." This is my first batch made from the recipe and the biscuits definitely have all those characteristics.

My guess is that that description is different from how you would describe your favorite Anzac biscuits. Am I right?
well done on giving them a go. I am sure they were delicious, didn't mean to criticise your cooking. But I think a touch less cooking on the bottom would taste a little nicer
 

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