Apple's announcements

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My take is that in the convergence of technologies between desktop->laptops->tablets and smartphones the losers have been the desktops, to a certain extend now the tablets.
They are being canibalised by the smartphones and laptops.
Laptops are the next one to be under attack.
They are being dumbed down with a huge offensive from the Chromebook vendors.
And they are successful (we are not their target audience so we may not feel it).
At the same time smartphones have become central to many generations' lives, including now two-factor security on many apps (health, bank, shops...).

In this world the lapop is struggling to compete on mobility, battery life and ecosystem integration (although macs are good at integrating but mostly only with the Apple ecosystem).
With Android's dominance, Microsoft already ported its software to non windows platform and diversified in cloud infrastructure.

It has proven easier for mobile chip manufacturers (such as ARM who license their blueprints and do not manufacture) to increase the performance of their mobile low power chips than Intel to increase the impact on battery life of theirs.
At the same time as the cloud prevails a lot of processing power needs not be in the laptop/desktop/device, but in the data center.
What matter is for the device to be always on and connected.

That may not be an attractive proposition for folks living in rural or remote places, but as the vast majority of the population with disposable income is within connecting distance of large megalopolis (in Asia, Africa and Central America), the numbers drive these changes.
It all makes business sense.

There will still be niches, that's not the end of the powerful laptop, there will be fewer affordable ones that's all.
 
Another article (and video) from MacRumors which provides a little more insight into what's coming from Apple; John Gruber, in his most recent podcast, talked with both Craig Federighi (AKA "Hair Force One") and Greg Joswiak. From the article:

"While avoiding direct mention of Windows, Federighi acknowledges that you won't be able to boot directly into x86 operating systems on these Macs. As it stands, Windows can't be directly supported on the Arm-based chips of Apple Silicon via virtualization, but Federighi made clear that Apple is well aware of the situation, without tipping his hand on what developments may appear on that front in the coming months."

https://www.macrumors.com/2020/06/25/talk-show-wwdc-gruber-federighi-joswiak/
 

Growltiger

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But it can't run the usual 64 bit software. Most software I use wouldn't work at all on it. The ad for it even recommends buying the Surface 7 instead.

So won't it flop too? How many people want low performance at a high price? If you don't want to run any serious software and just want email and casual browsing, why not get an iPad?
 
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Microsoft is, I am sure, fully aware of this and has a strategy to ensure they do not lose customers.
The fact that some ARM designs run Windows today makes me think it is not going to be a show stopper.
 
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But it can't run the usual 64 bit software. Most software I use wouldn't work at all on it. The ad for it even recommends buying the Surface 7 instead.

So won't it flop too? How many people want low performance at a high price? If you don't want to run any serious software and just want email and casual browsing, why not get an iPad?
It is a works in progress.
And performance is not described as poor, on the contrary.
However Adobe is allegedly developing ARM64 versions of its software, and a full IntelX64 emulator is said to be coming.
https://www.windowscentral.com/surface-pro-x
I did not even realise that the HP Envy x2 was ARM based too.

They have a clear segment in mind, you and I are not it.
" The Pro X audience is not mainstream, but it is increasingly relevant for what is often referred to as "nomadic workers". The Economist wrote that by 2035, up to one billion workers could be classified as "location independent." Microsoft — in conjunction with Qualcomm — has been hard at work making a line of PCs that cater to this crowd. "

I think Apple is also very clear about where it sees the market going and Intel is not offering them what they need.
 

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It is a works in progress.
And performance is not described as poor, on the contrary.
However Adobe is allegedly developing ARM64 versions of its software, and a full IntelX64 emulator is said to be coming.
https://www.windowscentral.com/surface-pro-x
I did not even realise that the HP Envy x2 was ARM based too.

They have a clear segment in mind, you and I are not it.
" The Pro X audience is not mainstream, but it is increasingly relevant for what is often referred to as "nomadic workers". The Economist wrote that by 2035, up to one billion workers could be classified as "location independent." Microsoft — in conjunction with Qualcomm — has been hard at work making a line of PCs that cater to this crowd. "

I think Apple is also very clear about where it sees the market going and Intel is not offering them what they need.
That all makes a lot of sense. Apple are smart and are following the money.

It does mean that there will be a proportion of current Mac users (the ones who make good use of powerful machines) who are no longer in the demographic Apple are interested in. Mind you this has been developing for some years with the slow release of the top end Macs.
 
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My guess is this in reference to the exploits Spectre V1, Spectre V2, V3 and Meltdown. Intel has been issuing fixes, most are in firmware, I doubt they’ve fixed all the attacks possible. They all exploit speculative
execution side channels. Friends still working on these fixes for intel have mentioned the performance hits for the fixes are 2 to 8 percent depending on what’s being done, I’ve seen reports in the press suggesting 30 percent but I have seen nothing on how they came up with that metric. I think Meltdown problem was Intel specific, I believe Spectre V1, V2 and V3 impacted chips from AMD, ARM and Intel. I don’t know what steps the non-intel processor companies have taken to mitigate these exploits. There was a tremendous amount of panic when these were made public. While there was an exploit published, but nothing exists to show it was ever used.
I don’t think I’d make purchase decisions based on these problems. I tend to look at performance of Photoshop on a platform. It’s really the only app I use on my Macs.
Correct and some cannot be fixed. At all. Without recasting the die.
 
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Mind you this has been developing for some years with the slow release of the top end Macs.
My 2008 MacPro's retirement date just got postponed ... Good job I didn't put it out to pasture and remortgage the house for the 2019.
Already looking at how to get it on to the upcoming B.S macOS version.
 
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I listened to the portion of the WWDC podcast that dealt with the new Mac's with Apple chips. I wasn't too sure about when I'd want to dive into the IOS Macs but they made the case convincingly (and strongly) that switching to Apple chips is the smart move. Microsoft Office, and (more importantly to us) Photoshop and Lightroom are already running natively on the new Apple chipped Macs. iPhone and iPad Apps will work without issue and they go on to say that bringing Intel Apps to IOS is going to be eased with their xcode2 software. Rosetta2 translates Mac intel apps as they are being loaded so even tho they're not IOS native apps they'll still run fast. It sure sounded like they have a solid plan and asides from addressing running Windows they got everything else covered. I may buy the IOS iMac when it happens along.

Disclaimer - I have a 2015 MBP that's basically my Windows 10 machine so I don't care if my IOS Macs can't boot into Windows.
 
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Growltiger

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I listened to the portion of the WWDC podcast that dealt with the new Mac's with Apple chips. I wasn't too sure about when I'd want to dive into the IOS Macs but they made the case convincingly (and strongly) that switching to Apple chips is the smart move. Microsoft Office, and (more importantly to us) Photoshop and Lightroom are already running natively on the new Apple chipped Macs. iPhone and iPad Apps will work without issue and they go on to say that bringing Intel Apps to IOS is going to be eased with their xcode2 software. Rosetta2 translates Mac intel apps as they are being loaded so even tho they're not IOS native apps they'll still run fast. It sure sounded like they have a solid plan and asides from addressing running Windows they got everything else covered. I may buy the IOS iMac when it happens along.

Disclaimer - I have a 2015 MBP that's basically my Windows 10 machine so I don't care if my IOS Macs can't boot into Windows.
Just to clarify... The ARM based Macs don't run iOS, they run macOS. This version of macOS allows one to macOS apps, and it also allows one to run iOS apps. There is no such thing as an iOS Mac.
 
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Just to clarify... The ARM based Macs don't run iOS, they run macOS. This version of macOS allows one to macOS apps, and it also allows one to run iOS apps. There is no such thing as an iOS Mac.
Yep, I was just referring to the new machines as IOS Macs. They'll be running MacOS but will execute IOS apps as well.
 
Thanks, Doug! That was interesting reading. As no one who knows me will be surprised to hear, I have absolutely no plans to return to Windows. Ever. When Apple releases its first ARM machine(s) I will watch with interest and after things seem a bit settled in well, maybe with the second round of releases, that will be about the time when I'd be ready to replace my current machines anyway. In the meantime I'm perfectly happy with my current setup and am looking forward to seeing what new joys and perhaps also occasional frustrations we'll be getting with the arrival of Big Sur in a few months.
 

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