Are DSLR s dying?

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Will there be a D6s in the future or a D850 successor? I see Nikon stock going down and I don't see anything good coming out of Nikon at the moment. Looks like Sony & Canon have some good new cameras but I see nothing on the Nikon end. I've been loyal to Nikon for many years but I don't see them going in the right direction. Maybe someone can chime in and give some opinions on this. For now I will stay put but my inclination to sell all my Nikon equipment has come to mind.

This is just my opinion

Constructive criticism always welcomed

Thank You
 
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Over the past several years some of us have made the switch, each for our own reasons, to other systems. At this point it is hard to tell what's going to happen next but recently Nikon has stated that they are going to be putting most of their efforts into mirrorless cameras and lenses, although I think they still may be intending to release one or more new DSLRs and lenses. Many people, including professionals, still prefer DSLRs and only use them, while others have been working with dual systems: mirrorless and DLSR, and still others (in increasing numbers) have either already moved wholly to mirrorless or are contemplating it. Speaking for myself, I know that I wouldn't be very successful at trying to work with two different systems, so that was one reason I made the complete switch, but it did take me rather a while to make up my mind and to actually do it.

There have been articles recently on the Petapixel website and also by Thom Hogan about the current status of Nikon, some of which are indeed mentioned in threads on here. Things don't look good but there is always hope that they can turn the situation around. They are definitely in a position of trying to play catch-up behind Sony and Canon, but they do have a loyal following, many of whom have already purchased their mirrorless bodies and lenses as well as using the FTZ adapter with some of their older lenses.
 
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Joined
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Nothing wrong with Nikon's current bodies and if I had all the latest F-mount DSLR and/or Z equipment I could shoot everything I need. Though in my opinion, Nikon is losing the interest of younger photographers even if their user base is still sizable. Just from personal interactions with selling Nikon equipment on either CL or FB Marketplace, the majority of buyers are much older (from 40-60+). With the Sony equipment I sell, it's usually a much younger demographic and a mix of video/stills photographers.

Nikon needs to rope in the new generation of photographers if they want to stay relevant. Millennials don't care about Nikon's heritage and if they want something stylish/retro, Fuji has that niche covered. Canon was slow to move, but they're going full steam now and I don't see any real weakness in either their EF DSLRs or RF mount line-up (though their M-mount APS-C line is an oddball). Sony being the large company that it is, has a ton of money to dump into E-mount cameras. In fact with their rapid model release and somewhat open lens mount, they've flooded the market with very affordable cameras and lenses for every budget.
 
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Will there be a D6s in the future or a D850 predecessor? I see Nikon stock going down and I don't see anything good coming out of Nikon at the moment. Looks like Sony & Canon have some good new cameras but I see nothing on the Nikon end. I've been loyal to Nikon for many years but I don't see them going in the right direction. Maybe someone can chime in and give some opinions on this. For now I will stay put but my inclination to sell all my Nikon equipment has come to mind.

This is just my opinion

Constructive criticism always welcomed

Thank You

I think you mean successor.

Well there isn't a high-end Nikon PRO level mirrorless . . . yet. Until there is, the pros that need it, will still be using the D6.
We were expecting to see something for the Tokyo Olympics, but nothing happened, dSLR or mirrorless.
So I think there will be one more cycle of FF pro dSLRs.

About the D750 and D850 dSLR successors, less sure, now that the Z6II and Z7II are out.
But there are still a LOT of Nikon dSLR users, so it may be worth another cycle of the D7xx and D8xx lines, to get more revenue out of the dSLR market.

But as was said, the move is to mirrorless, so I expect Nikon to stop development of dSLRs at some point. Then just keep making the last dSLR models, as long as it is profitable.

Edited to specify high end NIKON pro mirrorless.
 
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I think you mean successor.

Well there isn't a high-end PRO level mirrorless . . . yet. Until there is, the pros that need it, will still be using the D6.
We were expecting to see something for the Tokyo Olympics, but nothing happened, dSLR or mirrorless.
So I think there will be one more cycle of FF pro dSLRs.

About the D750 and D850 dSLR successors, less sure, now that the Z6II and Z7II are out.
But there are still a LOT of Nikon dSLR users, so it may be worth another cycle of the D7xx and D8xx lines, to get more revenue out of the dSLR market.

But as was said, the move is to mirrorless, so I expect Nikon to stop development of dSLRs at some point. Then just keep making the last dSLR models, as long as it is profitable.

Actually, Sony is about to release its new A1, which sure sounds to me like a real speed demon that can equal or exceed the fast and black-out free continuous high that it has with its A9 II while also offering a sensor with higher resolution than the A9 or A9 II bodies, while not quite matching up to the A7R IV's 61MP. The new camera hasn't been released yet to the public, is still in the hands of reviewers, so we're waiting to see if actual hands-on experiences as reported by reliable, genuine photographers and reviewers (not click-bait YouTubers like that Northrup guy) reflect and live up to the promises made by Sony with its newest flagship camera body. If it really is as terrific as it sounds and as functional, I can easily imagine this one being front-and-center firing away at many of the Olympics events. Sony has the long prime lenses, too, for this sort of event. Mirrorless has some advantages over DSLRs and what better place to take advantage of that than the high-stress, fast-paced environment of the Olympic Games?
 
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Though in my opinion, Nikon is losing the interest of younger photographers even if their user base is still sizable. Just from personal interactions with selling Nikon equipment on either CL or FB Marketplace, the majority of buyers are much older (from 40-60+).

You are correct. I am in the much, "much older" group (70+) and I recently bought a Z50. Maybe Nikon thinks they need to sell to us before it's too late!
 
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Actually, Sony is about to release its new A1, which sure sounds to me like a real speed demon that can equal or exceed the fast and black-out free continuous high that it has with its A9 II while also offering a sensor with higher resolution than the A9 or A9 II bodies, while not quite matching up to the A7R IV's 61MP. The new camera hasn't been released yet to the public, is still in the hands of reviewers, so we're waiting to see if actual hands-on experiences as reported by reliable, genuine photographers and reviewers (not click-bait YouTubers like that Northrup guy) reflect and live up to the promises made by Sony with its newest flagship camera body. If it really is as terrific as it sounds and as functional, I can easily imagine this one being front-and-center firing away at many of the Olympics events. Sony has the long prime lenses, too, for this sort of event. Mirrorless has some advantages over DSLRs and what better place to take advantage of that than the high-stress, fast-paced environment of the Olympic Games?

Sorry, since the OP was talking about Nikon, I meant that Nikon does not have a high level pro mirrorless camera.
The new Sony is a $6,500 camera. Way way above the Z7.
 

NCV

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Why all the pessimism, with the Nikon Z5,6,7, they have put on the market three brilliant models that most mere mortals can afford and which will meet the needs of most without problem.

I quite happily use my D810 and my Z7 side by side.

How many really need a thousand frames a second and ant eye focus detection?
 

kilofoxtrott

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I'm still using my D700 and D3S and I'm contented with the results these cameras are delivering what I need.
In my opinion the production intervals are to short in the last few years. Good cameras don't need to be exchanged every 2 - 4 years.

If I would start new to this hobby I believe the Sony would be my choice.

Use the equipment you own and go out shooting
Klaus
 
Sorry, since the OP was talking about Nikon, I meant that Nikon does not have a high level pro mirrorless camera.
The new Sony is a $6,500 camera. Way way above the Z7.

Actually, I have seen rumors and hints that Nikon will eventually be bringing out a new high-end mirrorless camera body, too, one which exceeds the abilities and specs of the current Z7 or Z7II. It is likely that this new camera will be priced above the ZII, as well. Thing is, when will that new camera be released? Will it have all the bells and whistles that are apparently expected these days? In the meantime pros and serious amateurs will already have had plenty of opportunity to shoot the new A1 and to determine if it will fulfill their needs and expectations. Canon, too, has something new in their mirrorless line which probably will be seen at the Olympics as well. The point being, that while some people still prefer to shoot with DSLRs, regardless of brand, the reality is that mirrorless technology is indeed moving forward and moving fast -- with Sony in the lead and Canon catching up quickly in terms of camera bodies and lenses which are available NOW.
 
Why all the pessimism, with the Nikon Z5,6,7, they have put on the market three brilliant models that most mere mortals can afford and which will meet the needs of most without problem.

I quite happily use my D810 and my Z7 side by side.

How many really need a thousand frames a second and ant eye focus detection?

Professionals shooting sports and wildlife, to mention two groups..... Wedding photographers, too, benefit from fast fps, eye focus, and silent shutter as well. Also, a key factor in this discussion is that it's not just the camera bodies and their whiz-bang, amazing functions and features that are important, it's the lenses, too, and availability of native lenses that will work with those new sophisticated mirrorless bodies. That's why Sony has that rather significant contract with the Associated Press. They've already got the goods now, in stores as well as ready to deliver, not just to pros who need all the top-of-the-line bodies and lenses, but they also offer a very nice selection of mirrorless camera bodies and lenses both in APS-C and FF for those who don't need or cannot afford the flagship models.
 
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Actually, I have seen rumors and hints that Nikon will eventually be bringing out a new high-end mirrorless camera body, too, one which exceeds the abilities and specs of the current Z7 or Z7II. It is likely that this new camera will be priced above the ZII, as well. Thing is, when will that new camera be released? Will it have all the bells and whistles that are apparently expected these days? In the meantime pros and serious amateurs will already have had plenty of opportunity to shoot the new A1 and to determine if it will fulfill their needs and expectations. Canon, too, has something new in their mirrorless line which probably will be seen at the Olympics as well. The point being, that while some people still prefer to shoot with DSLRs, regardless of brand, the reality is that mirrorless technology is indeed moving forward and moving fast -- with Sony in the lead and Canon catching up quickly in terms of camera bodies and lenses which are available NOW.

The thing with all the manufacturers is, the Tokyo Olympus was originally supposed to happen LAST YEAR.
So the Olympus products should have been released last year, 2020.
Maybe they were holding off for the postponement of the Tokyo Olympics to 2021, in which case product should be announced or leaked about now.

I agree, kinda.
For mirrorless cameras, Nikon and Canon are seriously behind.
Just as Canon replace Nikon for sports many years ago, today Sony has taken the lead in mirrorless from both Nikon and Canon. Both Nikon and Canon waited too long to respond. They did not see the market changing and let Sony have the mirrorless market for too long.

The only chance Nikon has is hoping that their pro and amateur uses will stay with them, until they get the appropriate mirrorless cameras out. But that thinking failed once before, when many of the pros jumped ship to Canon, and is happening today with the AP contract with Sony.

Once you fall behind, and the people change brands, it can be very hard to catch up.
Nikon still has not caught up from the pros jumping ship to Canon, and probably never will. Just look at all the white lenses at press conferences and sporting events.
 

Butlerkid

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Hi, Mike D! Are DSLR's dying? I sure hope not. Mine are quite healthy and giving me far more potential than I can use! :D My D850 and D5 are a perfect combo and my glass is top notch. There is nothing more I need. I can tackle any photo op and, if I do my part, create stunning images.

A new camera will not improve my images. Period. Fun to play with a new camera or different brand and brag about? .....meh..... I'll leave that to others.

However, I am watching with interest the evolution of cameras. Someday in the not too distant future I will probably decide to lighten my load. At that time, weight will be a consideration but not at the expense of image quality. In the meantime, I'm loving the gear I have.
 
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You are correct. I am in the much, "much older" group (70+) and I recently bought a Z50. Maybe Nikon thinks they need to sell to us before it's too late!

It's actually worth noting the last two items I sold, were bought either out of sentiment (D700) or they always wanted to try a certain lens (Nikon 50mm f/1.2 AI-S) and both purchased by older photographers. I had the feeling both these photographers wanted to just enjoy equipment, versus keeping up with latest and greatest.
 
I remember back some years ago when I first handled a mirrorless camera, Sony's NEX-7, and was surprised at the smaller size of it and the light weight, especially with small, lightweight lenses. My current A7R IV is somewhat smaller in dimension and lighter weight than my previous DSLRs, not as bulky, but by the time I slip on a large prime or zoom lens there isn't as much advantage in terms of weight any more. Most of my lenses are handholdable but my longest zoom does need to be on the tripod.

Several considerations came into play when I was making my decision about where I wanted to go with my photography, and obviously quality of images was and is important. Sony's lenses are excellent and I am very pleased with each of the ones I have purchased and used so far. Once I'd decided to go mirrorless, a big factor for me in making the switch was to be able to purchase native lenses, rather than depending on any sort of adapter, and that was a major strike against Nikon as far as I was concerned. They simply did not (and for that matter still do not) have the particular native lenses that I wanted, that were important to me. So while Nikon users are still waiting for certain lenses and in the meantime making do by using their old DSLR lenses with an adapter on their new Nikon mirrorless bodies, I've been out there this past year happily shooting with excellent native lenses already available from Sony that work flawlessly with my Sony body. There are a lot of other former Nikon users doing much the same.....and that's a big problem for Nikon.

Nikon has a lot of catching up to do and, yes, it may be too late.
 
Joined
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Like Connie I switched systems to sony - swithced in october 2019.
Vision issues made it difficult for me to see with the dslr format I grew up with, the viewscreens on the mirrorless could be adjusted so I could see better, and confirm focus. I tried staying with the dslr format for over a year after eye surgery- and just could not adapt.
I bled nikon for 40 years. But, I wanted a mature system with native lenses. I will admit I never tried the nikon adapter, but had tried other adapters in the past and did not want to go through that again. So I shot with a sony for a while, and then jumped into their system with both feet.
I am very happy with the sony system. I have the new sony a1 on order- so I can have 2 bodies. I have all the native lenses I could want.
Is sony perfect? Nope. I wish it fit my hand a little better. The copy of the 70-200mm I tried was soft, so I don't have this classic sports zoom- yet.
Canon has made huge strides, with the r cameras. I hope sony a1 focuses as well as the r5. Canon has a huge supply of great lenses.
Nikon needs to get on board. IMHO they have one more generation of mirrorless cameras to show what they can do.
Pre surgery I wondered what all the talk about mirrorless cameras was about- how could it be better than my dslr.
I will never go back. The wysiwyg makes my type of photography easy- really tough tight exposure issues can be nailed first time, everytime.
Although I am no longer in the nikon camp, I sure hope they can produce equipment that the marketplace loves.
I wish them the best
gary
 
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I think you mean successor.

Well there isn't a high-end PRO level mirrorless . . . yet. Until there is, the pros that need it, will still be using the D6.
We were expecting to see something for the Tokyo Olympics, but nothing happened, dSLR or mirrorless.
So I think there will be one more cycle of FF pro dSLRs.

About the D750 and D850 dSLR successors, less sure, now that the Z6II and Z7II are out.
But there are still a LOT of Nikon dSLR users, so it may be worth another cycle of the D7xx and D8xx lines, to get more revenue out of the dSLR market.

But as was said, the move is to mirrorless, so I expect Nikon to stop development of dSLRs at some point. Then just keep making the last dSLR models, as long as it is profitable.
Hi, Mike D! Are DSLR's dying? I sure hope not. Mine are quite healthy and giving me far more potential than I can use! :D My D850 and D5 are a perfect combo and my glass is top notch. There is nothing more I need. I can tackle any photo op and, if I do my part, create stunning images.

A new camera will not improve my images. Period. Fun to play with a new camera or different brand and brag about? .....meh..... I'll leave that to others.

However, I am watching with interest the evolution of cameras. Someday in the not too distant future I will probably decide to lighten my load. At that time, weight will be a consideration but not at the expense of image quality. In the meantime, I'm loving the gear I have.
Karen

I think you and I have similar equipment and Im quite happy with mine but one must wonder Nikons stake in the business. Mirrorless is here to stay but Nikon is not producing anything new that will be better than my D5/D850 and all my glass. So sometimes I just wonder........
 

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