Are DSLR s dying?

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16-17 years ago, the topic was "Are film SLR dying?" and we were saying Nikon was late and behind in the dSLR market and would die.

And maybe 10 years from now, the topic will be "Are mirrorless dying?" and we will be saying Nikon(if still there) is late and behind in the whatever market and will die.
 
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A couple of things jump out at me when I read the comments in this thread. First, there seems to be a perception that switching from DSLR to mirrorless is a big transition. I don't get it. There's a viewfinder, a shutter button, go take pictures. Different menus and placement of buttons on the body take some getting used to. But that has always been frustrating with Nikon products anyway. With every generation they move a few things around. Just enough to be really annoying. I've got multiple bodies and picking up one of them that I haven't used for a while has its share of suppressed/mumbled profanities. I've used a Nikon V1 and then a Sony A6000 for several years as my international travel kit when I don't anticipate any high speed photography. The only real differences I see vs using one of my DSLR bodies are ergonomics and menu navigation. BTW I didn't like shooting with the V1 and now don't like shooting with the A6000. But I still manage to come home with satisfying photos.

The second thing is that we seem to forget that for any of us who don't make a living with a camera we don't NEED to change/upgrade. We may WANT to but there's no real need to. So whether it's a new DSLR or a new mirrorless camera the manufacturer has to put something out there that makes me WANT it badly enough to lay out hundreds or thousands of dollars.

One high risk decision in Nikon's mirrorless strategy was the switch to a different lens mount. I fully understand the technical advantages. But that decision opened the door for those with Nikon lenses(including pros) to consider mirrorless bodies from other brands. If I'm going to have to use an adapter for my existing lenses then why not go with the mirrorless body that best fits my needs regardless of who makes it. For action photography Sony currently has(arguably) the best mirrorless bodies. It will be interesting to see how many Sony A9 and A1 bodies will show up hanging on Nikon lenses in the coming months.
 
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Just a bit of my perspective.

is the DSLR dying? Yes, I believe that everyone is looking full force to the mirrorless camera now. They finally see the future and mirrorless is where all the money is going.

Nikon came into the game late, and I think they feel that their f mount glass can be a viable option for many that want to switch to mirrorless and for those longer lenses they already have, especially the PF lenses.

Nikons been an underdog before. They were often written off early in the D1 and D2 days. It was only once they released the D3 that people realized what they had.

I’m one of those that doesn’t understand the people that are so negative on the Z system. I’m not a birder, but I do shoot sports. For a large selection of sports, I can shoot with the Z6 with no issue. Is it a D500/D5 level in auto focus?
No, but I never expected it to be.

do I believe that the rumored to be released new Z camera is going to be way better? Heck yes! Nikon just needs to catch up and they will.

my feeling is that mirrorless has been around a lot longer and there is not a lot of difference between any system. No one is going to put out anything mind blowing or crushing to another.

the internet /you tubers have done more damage with disinformation to all camera systems. I miss having an honest reviewer and not one beholden to a company because they don’t want to get banned from early reviews.

Nikon can pull through this, but they are going to have to bet it all on mirrorless, swing for the fences and make smart decisions.
It appears that Pentax will be the king of DSLRs, and they can succeed very well as the last niche flappy mirror camera maker if they want.
the z6 produces beautiful pics and there's alot I like about it but AF is a show stopper for me,,,,
the d500 is no D5 in the AF dept. yet it is still 2x better than the AF on my z6
 
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the z6 produces beautiful pics and there's alot I like about it but AF is a show stopper for me,,,,
the d500 is no D5 in the AF dept. yet it is still 2x better than the AF on my z6

I've shot football(american and soccer), boxing and the Arnold Fitness Expo with the Z6 with no issues. Is it a D500 level AF ? Surely not. Is it different? It surely is.

once I figured out how to deal with the differences then the AF performed a lot like my D700/D300 used to.
The Z6 biggest issues are low contrast/low light, but that can be said about any on sensor PDAF camera out there.

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First, there seems to be a perception that switching from DSLR to mirrorless is a big transition. I don't get it.

It was a big transition for me that made the process of capturing an image far more enjoyable. The three most important capabilities of the Z6 that make it so include focus peaking, focus bracketing, and display of the histogram before releasing the shutter. I believe the Nikon DSLR line has just one camera that includes one of those capabilities; the far more expensive D850 has focus bracketing.

The second thing is that we seem to forget that for any of us who don't make a living with a camera we don't NEED to change/upgrade. We may WANT to but there's no real need to.

To carry that line of thinking even farther, I don't NEED to take photographs. Even so, why deny myself the pleasure of taking them? Similarly, why deny myself the opportunity to upgrade to a mirrorless camera that makes the process of capturing images so enjoyable.

I upgraded from my DSLR system to my mirrorless system for a net cost of $2050. That includes everything such as a polarizer filter in a new size, extra battery, etc., and I still have the DSLR and its most frequently used native lens as a backup camera system. I also have a macro lens that I can use on that camera for when I want to combine macro and focus bracketing using an external device to make it happen. If I use my new mirrorless camera for the ten years that I used my most recent DSLR camera, I have all of that at an amortized cost of slightly more than $17 a month. I shudder to think of the few months that I don't waste more money than that not even knowing what I wasted it on.
 
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It was a big transition for me that made the process of capturing an image far more enjoyable. The three most important capabilities of the Z6 that make it so include focus peaking, focus bracketing, and display of the histogram before releasing the shutter. I believe the Nikon DSLR line has just one camera that includes one of those capabilities; the far more expensive D850 has focus bracketing.



To carry that line of thinking even farther, I don't NEED to take photographs. Even so, why deny myself the pleasure of taking them? Similarly, why deny myself the opportunity to upgrade to a mirrorless camera that makes the process of capturing images so enjoyable.

I upgraded from my DSLR system to my mirrorless system for a net cost of $2050. That includes everything such as a polarizer filter in a new size, extra battery, etc., and I still have the DSLR and its most frequently used native lens as a backup camera system. I also have a macro lens that I can use on that camera for when I want to combine macro and focus bracketing using an external device to make it happen. If I use my new mirrorless camera for the ten years that I used my most recent DSLR camera, I have all of that at an amortized cost of slightly more than $17 a month. I shudder to think of the few months that I don't waste more money than that not even knowing what I wasted it on.
I am actually starting to feel that I don't need to take photographs either.
On many levels:
why a DSLR?
1-the iphone 12 Pro Max (or whatever it is named) I have takes great pictures which I can share in less than a minute with multiple audiences.
2-I can play with special effects thanks to free and paid for apps.
3-people like these pictures.
4-kids LOVE them and use their phones too.
5-the hassle of transferring pictures, storing them, editing them, posting them...
taking photos in general ?
6-not able to travel, not able to go out, seriously limits creativity now.
7-I always remember my French teacher (she was French teaching French to -mostly- French kids in France, classe de seconde) when we studied poetry, "I would not advise you to consider making a living as a poet, the best poems have been written already, you are mostly going to come up with 3rd best cliches". I hardly see original photos nowadays, and that is because so many people are taking so many photos and sharing them on so many platforms.
8-linked to 7, unless it is personal, it is rarely original (to me), I find it more difficult to connect to pictures.
9-when we met in persons it was fun to show printed photos, even the odd carrousel slide session, it is all moot at the moment
10-social connections are digital, mostly through Zoom or other platforms (for us here in London in lockdown).
11-not sure that once things improve people (and that includes me) will go back to the old ways, although I am dying to get my Bronica back in use, provided I have things to take pictures of.
 
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I am actually starting to feel that I don't need to take photographs either.

I'm confused. That's because you then explained the advantages of using your phone to take pictures.

I hardly see original photos nowadays

I have a plan for a photo to be made in the next day or so that is unlike any I've ever seen. It can still be done. Even so, I can enjoy making and viewing a photo that is similar to photos made perhaps millions of times as much as I can enjoy a photo that is perhaps unlike any other photo.
 
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I am actually starting to feel that I don't need to take photographs either.
On many levels:
why a DSLR?
1-the iphone 12 Pro Max (or whatever it is named) I have takes great pictures which I can share in less than a minute with multiple audiences.
2-I can play with special effects thanks to free and paid for apps.
3-people like these pictures.
4-kids LOVE them and use their phones too.
5-the hassle of transferring pictures, storing them, editing them, posting them...
taking photos in general ?
6-not able to travel, not able to go out, seriously limits creativity now.
7-I always remember my French teacher (she was French teaching French to -mostly- French kids in France, classe de seconde) when we studied poetry, "I would not advise you to consider making a living as a poet, the best poems have been written already, you are mostly going to come up with 3rd best cliches". I hardly see original photos nowadays, and that is because so many people are taking so many photos and sharing them on so many platforms.
8-linked to 7, unless it is personal, it is rarely original (to me), I find it more difficult to connect to pictures.
9-when we met in persons it was fun to show printed photos, even the odd carrousel slide session, it is all moot at the moment
10-social connections are digital, mostly through Zoom or other platforms (for us here in London in lockdown).
11-not sure that once things improve people (and that includes me) will go back to the old ways, although I am dying to get my Bronica back in use, provided I have things to take pictures of.

For me, photography is not just about the end product.

There is a process there that is intriguing and alluring to me. The craft of getting the image captured, the ability to transform the image from photons to bytes and bits, then into art.
If it is all about just sharing a fleeting moment in time on a social platform or in a text, then just about anything will do that can convey that.

For me, there is something very special about using a device specifically designed for a purpose. A camera for photos, even though my cellphone has a camera on it. Convenience leaves a lot to be desired on the performance and quality front. Same as we all have cars that we drive every day, but there is something special about getting behind the wheel of a race car or high performance vehicle that cannot be replicated by family sedan.
 
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I'm confused. That's because you then explained the advantages of using your phone to take pictures.



I have a plan for a photo to be made in the next day or so that is unlike any I've ever seen. It can still be done. Even so, I can enjoy making and viewing a photo that is similar to photos made perhaps millions of times as much as I can enjoy a photo that is perhaps unlike any other photo.
1-5 are about not using a DLSR and 8-11 not taking pictures.
Spectrum of emotions/feelings, not manichean.
Hope that helps.
 
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I also replaced my D5500 "Hiking' camera with a Z50 and I'm even more pleased with that choice.
I like your downsizing choices. I need a pocket camera (smaller than the Z50) that I can actually fit in my back pocket. After some research, I decided on the X-E4 with a 27mm pancake lens.
 
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I am actually starting to feel that I don't need to take photographs either.
I find being limited in my travel and get togethers with friends and family have made making pictures more important than ever, for me.
Yeck, I took a picture of an onion yesterday.
I am starting a project of images from around the house.
I think the lack of external stimuli is starting to drive me nuts.
I don't care what camera I use- but I still need to make pictures.
gary
 
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I think it's kind of funny that these camera companies sell the latest and greatest to consumers making them think they need to spend thousands of dollars to take great photos. Now that I've been getting into cycling, I see this same type of marketing in the bicycle market. I see riders on bikes and equipment that cost well into the thousands as well, but many of these riders look like they had just gorged themselves on 15 Big Mac burgers from McDonalds as if expensive bikes will compensate for their lack of real fitness, strength training and creating an alert nervous system!

Just like photography, many photographers still haven't haven't fully leveraged the imaging side with either weak composition/technique and lacking in strong post processing skills necessary to make their pictures stand out. Just like any discipline, you really need to start with the fundamentals and work your way up, while acquiring the adequate equipment to match your skill level and real world needs.

I remember starting DSLR photography with the old 3mp D1 with an alpha/numeric interface (not even a real GUI) and even the 3/6 shot jpeg/raw buffer of the D100 at 3fps! Everything else just seems so luxurious! :ROFLMAO:
 
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start with the fundamentals and work your way up, while acquiring the adequate equipment to match your skill level and real world needs.

I've never owned camera equipment that didn't far exceed my skill level and I like it that way. That's because when my photos don't meet my hopes, I know with absolute certainty the situation is caused by me rather than my equipment. Without that certainty, I wouldn't know which next steps to take toward improving the photos.
 
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I see riders on bikes and equipment that cost well into the thousands as well, but many of these riders look like they had just gorged themselves on 15 Big Mac burgers from McDonalds as if expensive bikes will compensate for their lack of real fitness, strength training and creating an alert nervous system!

Good thing I was long done with my coffee, otherwise you would have cost me MacBook :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::eek:
 
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I see riders on bikes and equipment that cost well into the thousands as well, but many of these riders look like they had just gorged themselves on 15 Big Mac burgers from McDonalds as if expensive bikes will compensate for their lack of real fitness, strength training and creating an alert nervous system!
Hey! I resemble that remark, I mean I resent- actually resemble is closer to the truth.
I did just buy one of those bikes that cost more than any camera I have ever owned. Just came back from riding 25m this morning. New bike didn't help me get any faster- but it did completely alleviate knee pain I was having even after several professional fittings. I bought a new bike my fitter recommended. No knee pain at all!! But, it did not help my riding. Just like my new camera body is not going to really help my photography.
But, I only live once.
gary
 
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I got a D850 about a year and a half ago with the intention, at 63, that it might be the last digital camera I get. I am not particularly enthused about these new mirrorless cameras; I guess after going on 48 years at this this old dog can still learn new tricks but at this point in my life I choose not to. I plan to stick with what works for me. All of my lenses are manual focus non-AI/AI or AIS and they all still perform brilliantly, both on my film and digital cameras.

I don't think DSLR's are dead or will be so any time soon. Now that I am retired, I am doing as much professional work as I want to and to be honest I do not know a single professional photographer who has made the move to mirrorless.
 

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