Are DSLR s dying?

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Nikon's D100 rejuvenated my photography, for years. New ideas, new styles, new tech, new everything. That progressed through the ensuing decade and a half until the Z6 showed up, and the impact was electrifying. YES, Nikon innovates.
Any questions?
 
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I got a D850 about a year and a half ago with the intention, at 63, that it might be the last digital camera I get. I am not particularly enthused about these new mirrorless cameras; I guess after going on 48 years at this this old dog can still learn new tricks but at this point in my life I choose not to. I plan to stick with what works for me. All of my lenses are manual focus non-AI/AI or AIS and they all still perform brilliantly, both on my film and digital cameras.

I don't think DSLR's are dead or will be so any time soon. Now that I am retired, I am doing as much professional work as I want to and to be honest I do not know a single professional photographer who has made the move to mirrorless.

I think many considered the Z6/Z7 not quite there yet. Three of the biggest complaint in no particular order were 1) the single card slot, 2) no vertical shutter/battery grip, and 3) lack of native lenses. The Z6II / Z7II solves the first two gripes, and #3 is gradually being met, so there may be more movement now.

As a pro, the question is, will the Z camera be a benefit to my business? If yes, then it makes sense to change to the Z. If not, then there is no business reason to go to the Z.
Example. Shooting at a concert, where silence is important, my Olympus EM1 made ZERO noise. The video tech was happy to not have a shutter firing off near the recording mics. Some of the viewers got very upset with the dSLR shutter sound during a concert.

If you have a LOT of mechanical AF lenses, they become an issue, as the FTZ adapter will not autofocus the mechanical AF lens. So you are forced to replace them with AF-S or Z lenses. In my case, I will have several lenses that become unusable on the Z cameras, forcing their replacement. In your case, since all your lenses are manual, you avoid that issue.

Personally, at my age and with injuries, it was reduce the weight of the kit, or stop shooting. The D7200 was becoming too heavy to lug around for any length of time. After a pair of football games, shooting with the D7200 + 70-200/4, I was SORE and hobbled back to the car. So, for my back and legs, I made the strategic decision to reduce the weight of my standard kit, and I went with Olympus m4/3. I am still learning to use it, but for some things I still prefer to use the D7200.

In the case of my school, I recommended they buy D5600s. It met their needs as well as a Z50, and was "good enough."
But, the Z 18-140 DX lens was and is still not available, and that is the lens they needed. So that killed the Z50 as an option.
Nikon currently only has TWO, DX Z lenses. If they don't fit your needs, you have to wait and hope that Nikon comes out with other DX Z lenses. We could not wait. The school bought four D5600 + 18-140 kits.
 
If a manufacturer does not have the camera body specs or the specific lenses that one (or one's organization) prefers or actually requires, IMHO that's the time to look elsewhere..... There ARE other options out there. Brand loyalty is nice up to a point, but if it actually interferes with particular goals and objectives of an individual or organization, it really doesn't make sense any more, does it?
 
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Brand loyalty is nice up to a point

I've never been loyal to a brand purely for the sake of being loyal. Whether it's a product, a service, or both being provided, the provider has to earn my business, not rely on my loyalty.

When I made the switch from DSLR to mirrorless, I considered five mirrorless systems from Olympus, Panasonic Lumix, FujiFilm and Nikon, and two dSLR systems from Nikon. Sensor formats included M4/3, APS-C and full frame. My comparison chart took into account 17 characteristics (3 that are must-have, 7 that are important, 5 that are helpful and details about weight and the cost of buying new equipment). Though I ended up staying with Nikon, the decision had nothing to do with loyalty; it had to do with the best fit when taking into account all of my needs.
 
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If a manufacturer does not have the camera body specs or the specific lenses that one (or one's organization) prefers or actually requires, IMHO that's the time to look elsewhere..... There ARE other options out there. Brand loyalty is nice up to a point, but if it actually interferes with particular goals and objectives of an individual or organization, it really doesn't make sense any more, does it?

If you are referring to me.

For mirrorless. As an alternative to the Z50 is the Canon M50.
While the M50 has more native lenses than the Z50, it like the Z50 does not have any native lens suitable for night and gym sports. So, we are backed into to using an EF lens on an EF to M adapter. In a school environment, with students, I don't want the hassles and confusion of using an adapter. KISS = using native mount lenses. So both Z50 and M50 are out due to lack of suitable native lenses.​
re: Sony. My contacts who own and use Sonys have a common complaint that the Sony UI STINKS. A ILC is difficult for an iPhone user to use, now give them a UI that STINKS, and the problem is worse.​

As an alternative to the D5600, I considered the Canon T7i, APS-C dSLR.
For various reasons, I preferred the D5600 over the T7i.​
The major reason is the Canon area focus uses "closest subject" logic. That does not work for team sports, where 50% of the time, another player will be closer to you than the subject, so the subject will end up out of focus. So with the Canon we are forced to single point AF. For HS kids, I do not expect the tracking precision that I could expect of an experienced photographer. So single point AF was a problem.​
Nikon's D9 and D21 give more tracking flexibility.​
The Tamron 17-50/2.8, 35-150/2.8-4 and 70-210/4 have been tested to do the job for us. And they are available in both Canon EF and Nikon F mounts. These lenses partially drove the selection.​

Finally, it is a school, with the typical budget issues, so cost was a major factor.

And for my own system I did switch from Nikon dSLR to Olympus mirrorless.
And I have been a Nikon user since the early 1970s.
 

kilofoxtrott

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My problem with the Z-series:
They all are to small for my hands.
OK, it may be my hands are the problem...
I feel discomfort carrying a Z for hours with a big lens mounted.
The grips of my D3S and D700 are perfect to me.

And - I still get the results I'm looking for...

Kind regards
Klaus
 
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re: Sony. My contacts who own and use Sonys have a common complaint that the Sony UI STINKS. A ILC is difficult for an iPhone user to use, now give them a UI that STINKS, and the problem is worse.
The UI does stink- for a while. For the first couple of weeks with the new sony system I was honestly ready to throw it in the lake.
There really are two issues. The menu system really makes no inherent sense and it takes a while to learn where everything is. But, once you learn it- it is ok.
The second issue is the camera is so programmable. Every button can do almost any command. Just like many people find photoshop difficult to use because it can do so much- the sony camera is the same.
I said the heck with it and just shot manual for a while, and slowly built my custom settings and custom menus.
Now it purrs. It is just different.
Just as an example, I actually have 4 different focus modes programmed into the shutter button and 3 different rear focus buttons.
Works for me.
gary
 
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I've shot football(american and soccer), boxing and the Arnold Fitness Expo with the Z6 with no issues. Is it a D500 level AF ? Surely not. Is it different? It surely is.

once I figured out how to deal with the differences then the AF performed a lot like my D700/D300 used to.
The Z6 biggest issues are low contrast/low light, but that can be said about any on sensor PDAF camera out there.

View attachment 1678373 View attachment 1678374 View attachment 1678375 View attachment 1678376 View attachment 1678377

i can shoot anything with any gear. i like easier though..... If I focus my z6 near, then far then try near again it won't happen. This is a somewhat known problem with some strange work arounds

The Z6 is about where the D50 was at the same stage of it's life. i'll keep an eye on nikon mirrorless to see when it catches up
 
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i can shoot anything with any gear. i like easier though..... If I focus my z6 near, then far then try near again it won't happen. This is a somewhat known problem with some strange work arounds

The Z6 is about where the D50 was at the same stage of it's life. i'll keep an eye on nikon mirrorless to see when it catches up

Really, I'm not finding that with any lens - native or adapted.

So far I've shot my Z6 with the FTZ and Nikon 300PF, 70-300/4.5-5.6E AF-P, 85/1.8G, Tamron 17-35/2-8-4 and Tamron 70-200/2.8 G2 with no AF issues whatsoever.
The native mounts have exceeded expectations, even the 24-200mm, while not better than the 24-70/4 in IQ is sill probably the best all in on travel/walk about lens I've used to date.
The primes (35 and 50) have been so accurate and crisp that it makes me giddy when using them.

Just strange that there would be such a disparity between experiences.
 
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...Just strange that there would be such a disparity between experiences.
Not really strange at all. We all shoot different subjects, have different expectations of our equipment, and communicate differently. If that wasn't the case topics like the one in this thread wouldn't result in nearly as much discussion.
 
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The UI does stink- for a while....It is just different.
Exactly so. Unfortunately for most people different = bad. I shoot a Sony A6000 once or twice a year for a couple of weeks each time when we travel. I don't enjoy fumbling around with the menu nor handling the body while shooting. But it makes no sense to mentally compare the ergonomics with those of my D4 every time I pick it up. I accept it for what it is and carry on with capturing photos. And thoroughly enjoy hiking around with several pounds less equipment on my back.
 
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Really, I'm not finding that with any lens - native or adapted.

So far I've shot my Z6 with the FTZ and Nikon 300PF, 70-300/4.5-5.6E AF-P, 85/1.8G, Tamron 17-35/2-8-4 and Tamron 70-200/2.8 G2 with no AF issues whatsoever.
The native mounts have exceeded expectations, even the 24-200mm, while not better than the 24-70/4 in IQ is sill probably the best all in on travel/walk about lens I've used to date.
The primes (35 and 50) have been so accurate and crisp that it makes me giddy when using them.

Just strange that there would be such a disparity between experiences.
Really, I'm not finding that with any lens - native or adapted.

So far I've shot my Z6 with the FTZ and Nikon 300PF, 70-300/4.5-5.6E AF-P, 85/1.8G, Tamron 17-35/2-8-4 and Tamron 70-200/2.8 G2 with no AF issues whatsoever.
The native mounts have exceeded expectations, even the 24-200mm, while not better than the 24-70/4 in IQ is sill probably the best all in on travel/walk about lens I've used to date.
The primes (35 and 50) have been so accurate and crisp that it makes me giddy when using them.

Just strange that there would be such a disparity between experiences.
We just had a big thread on this topic and someone made a YouTube
 
Fortunately for me, using the Sony NEX 7 first some years ago, then moving through a series of Sony's small RX100 compact cameras and then the RX10 IV somewhat prepared me for dealing with the menu system when I brought home my A7R IV..... Even at that, though, it still was a bit challenging and more than once, I'd set something, then shoot that way a while, then go back to the menu and tinker some more and try something different. Now I'm very comfortable with the menu system and know pretty much where to find a particular item if needed, but I rarely need to menu-dive anyway. I shoot in manual mode most of the time and haven't really programmed a lot of specific settings, since it seems that for me each situation turns out to be a little different anyway.

AC12, actually, no, I wasn't referring to you when I made the comment about brand loyalty, but your post reminded me of that being a situation for some people -- especially a woman I know on another web-based forum who seems to be a classic example of total blind, do-or-die faith, clinging to loyalty to a particular brand -- but of course that's her problem and her money, so why should I care?

Mike, your thorough approach to researching products, analyzing pros and cons and other aspects of decision-making sounds similar to mine, and the results in the end are the same -- you're happy with your choice, and I'm happy with mine! :)
 
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Is anything perfect?
No!
Not even me!
Or you!
Can't argue that's theoretically correct. But within reasonable/practical limits .... :D
... I rarely need to menu-dive anyway....
I guess it comes down to how differently we all use our cameras. Yeah I don't get the fuss over menus either. I just don't go in there and muck around that often. But I probably only use about ten percent of the capabilities of my cameras. I guess I can understand how it's more important to power users.
 
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Karen

I think you and I have similar equipment and Im quite happy with mine but one must wonder Nikons stake in the business. Mirrorless is here to stay but Nikon is not producing anything new that will be better than my D5/D850 and all my glass. So sometimes I just wonder........
Karen - I'm in a bit of a different situation. I'm shooting with a D810 and my primary lens are the 24-70 2.8 and the 17-35 2.8. The 24-70 has an update but it is even bigger than my current 24-70. There is no update for the 17-35 and it is getting pretty long in the tooth with respect to performance. The new Z mount lens for both distances appear to be better alternatives based on the reviews I've read. I also use an 80-400 lens pretty extensively to take images of birds. The D810 AF is pretty good for birds that are perched but just ok for trying to get birds in flight. I'd like to upgrade the two lens I mentioned but the Z 7 II isn't reported to be that great for capturing BIFs so I'm facing a real conundrum on how to proceed. I could wait out another season of shooting but I'm not getting any younger. Any feedback from members would be appreciated.
 

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