Are DSLR s dying?

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I guess it comes down to how differently we all use our cameras. Yeah I don't get the fuss over menus either. I just don't go in there and muck around that often. But I probably only use about ten percent of the capabilities of my cameras. I guess I can understand how it's more important to power users.
In the old days, there was no menu system, just a few simple dials on the camera. When we took a bad photo, we did not blame the camera, we learned and moved on, and be happy to see our improvement next time. Photography was so enjoyable.
 
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. . .

I guess it comes down to how differently we all use our cameras. Yeah I don't get the fuss over menus either. I just don't go in there and muck around that often. But I probably only use about ten percent of the capabilities of my cameras. I guess I can understand how it's more important to power users.

That is the problem with menus.
When I have to do something that I don't do often, I have to . . . figure out where it is burried in the menu.
Sometimes it is logical, and I can find it. But . . . sometimes I just cannot find the blasted item in the menu.
Out of frustration, I've taken to making a spreadsheet where I can identify the items that I change, and I can see where it is in the menu. And what some of the not so clear description means.
 
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In the old days, there was no menu system, just a few simple dials on the camera. When we took a bad photo, we did not blame the camera, we learned and moved on, and be happen to see our improvement next time. Photography was so enjoyable.

I think that is why I don't freak out about lighting.
If the camera's meter can't deal with the lighting, I fall back to old fashioned manual.
Whereas the kids today have nothing to fall back to. For some/many of them, if the scene mode doesn't work they don't know what to do.
That is my battle. NONE of the cameras that the school uses, is capable of low light sports in scene mode (where the ISO is capped at 3200 on the D5600). So I have to teach the kids how to use PSAM.
 
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One thing I always do is look for a website or even an e-book or printed book available with info on whatever camera body I've just bought, and when I can't figure out something or find it in the menu system I simply check the book or the website..... Sometimes I run a Google search and that gives me the answer, too. An answer and solution is out there somewhere, I just have to find it!

AC12, now I am confused. Are you in the classroom on a regular basis teaching actual photography to these kids or is it merely an adjunct, a sideline to their real interest, which is in sports? Why on earth would they even be using "scene mode" in the first place? IMHO that's for the point-and-shoot crowd, not someone learning and striving to be a real photographer.
 
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One thing I always do is look for a website or even an e-book or printed book available with info on whatever camera body I've just bought, and when I can't figure out something or find it in the menu system I simply check the book or the website..... Sometimes I run a Google search and that gives me the answer, too. An answer and solution is out there somewhere, I just have to find it!

AC12, now I am confused. Are you in the classroom on a regular basis teaching actual photography to these kids or is it merely an adjunct, a sideline to their real interest, which is in sports? Why on earth would they even be using "scene mode" in the first place? IMHO that's for the point-and-shoot crowd, not someone learning and striving to be a real photographer.

No, I am not on the school staff.
I used to be the volunteer yearbook photo advisor.
This year I am the volunteer photo advisor to the Sports Leadership class.
I may move to photo advising the journalism class next. I saw some examples of their pictures. Some are P&S types, and they definitely need help.
I only have enough bandwidth and energy to advise ONE class at a time.

I have had the whole range of kids to deal with.
One one end, are the kids who are really interested in photography and know how to shoot in manual mode and handle other stuff.
But, once they find how technical low light sports photography is, some of the photo types realize it is deeper than then want to get.​
On the other end are those who are not interested in photography, and just need to take the picture for whatever section they are writing. They are in the P&S category, and they have been the majority of the yearbook class.

This year yearbook reorganized the staff into two groups, writer and photographers. So there should be less of the P&S types as photographers.
 
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I think that is why I don't freak out about lighting.
If the camera's meter can't deal with the lighting, I fall back to old fashioned manual.
Whereas the kids today have nothing to fall back to. For some/many of them, if the scene mode doesn't work they don't know what to do.
That is my battle. NONE of the cameras that the school uses, is capable of low light sports in scene mode (where the ISO is capped at 3200 on the D5600). So I have to teach the kids how to use PSAM.

I teach photography lessons from anyone in their teens to 60's. I am amazed and dismayed at the lack of understanding of the basics of photography. The "auto everything" generation.
 

Butlerkid

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A dear friend, excellent engineer, used to always ask me questions about photography. 3 variables....really. He never could get it. :rolleyes: Now he doesn't ask and I'm happy about that. His wife, on the other hand, easily understand the interdependce of shutter speed, aperture and ISO.
 
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A dear friend, excellent engineer, used to always ask me questions about photography. 3 variables....really. He never could get it. :rolleyes: Now he doesn't ask and I'm happy about that. His wife, on the other hand, easily understood the interdependce of shutter speed, aperture and ISO.

I have an idea to make a slide rule with 3 sliders; shutter speed, aperture and ISO. With the ss, f/stop and ISO one one side, and 1-10 on the other side.
I think an old fashioned display would help to explain the interdependence.
I just got to make a prototype to see how it works.
 

NCV

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In the old days, there was no menu system, just a few simple dials on the camera. When we took a bad photo, we did not blame the camera, we learned and moved on, and be happy to see our improvement next time. Photography was so enjoyable.

Yes, exactly. How ever did I manage to get sharp shots with a Nikon FM2 with a manual focus Tamron 300mm F2.8. When things were out of focus, it was my bad technique. I did use a motor drive that noisily gave me 3 frames a second.

I have just read a couple of postings by guys on DPR squabbling about a camera doing 60 frames a second over one that "just" does 30 frames a second. Hilarious.

Al lot of useful progress has been made with photographic equipment, and I would not want to go back to 1988 when I shot these two shots. But I do feel sometimes that we have all become a bit deskilled and lazy with our technique.

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Yes, exactly. How ever did I manage to get sharp shots with a Nikon FM2 with a manual focus Tamron 300mm F2.8. When things were out of focus, it was my bad technique. I did use a motor drive that noisily gave me 3 frames a second.

I have just read a couple of postings by guys on DPR squabbling about a camera doing 60 frames a second over one that "just" does 30 frames a second. Hilarious.

Al lot of useful progress has been made with photographic equipment, and I would not want to go back to 1988 when I shot these two shots. But I do feel sometimes that we have all become a bit deskilled and lazy with our technique.

Yup a LOT has to do with skill and familiarity with the game, and really understanding the gear.

I shot sports with film before the motor winders and when motor drives were exclusive and expensive. So I shot as fast as my thumb could crank the film advance lever. :D
I tell the kids, in my day it was not frames per second, it was seconds per frame. So we usually only had ONE shot per event, and we learned timing.

Not 60fps, but 6. A couple years ago, I was shooting tennis, and I had consistently better luck shooting the serve in single shot mode, rather than at 6fps. But for new photogs, that is a skill that has to be learned. And most of them do not have the patience to do that.

Autofocus is a great technology for shooting sports. But . . .
Autofocus is useless when trying to shoot though the volleyball net, to get the player on the other side. The AF will 99% of the time focus on the net. Same with shooting water polo and soccer through the goal net.
Switch to manual focus, and it is easy to focus on the player on the other side of the net.

As you said, AF makes life so much easier, and I would not want to go back to a fully manual lens. However, there have been times when the AF in my lens would "hunt." And as Murphey would have it, those were important plays, like kicking the soccer goal. Those were the times that I was so frustrated with the technology, that I wanted to go to full manual focus. But a 2-ring zoom is not easy to zoom AND focus with. My old 80-200/4.5 with it's single zoom/focus ring was really nice for shooting sports.

One problem is, the dSLR screen is not as easy to manually focus as the old SLR screens.
I used to follow focus the action with my F2. I am not sure that I could do than on my D7200. But now I'm curious to see if I can. Although my follow focus skill is really rusty.
 
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Years ago, when I shot film, if I missed a shot- it was my fault.
Now, if someone misses a shot- it is nearly always the camera's fault.
Skillsets that use to take years to mature- are now achieved-at least in their minds- in a day.
By the 3rd day shooting, they expect to be in a gallery. That is also when they decide they should be making money with their great talent.
It actually has gotten pretty easy to get a decent shot.
It is still really really hard to get a really good shot.
Many can not tell the difference.
gary
 
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Years ago, when I shot film, if I missed a shot- it was my fault.
Now, if someone misses a shot- it is nearly always the camera's fault.
Skillsets that use to take years to mature- are now achieved-at least in their minds- in a day.
By the 3rd day shooting, they expect to be in a gallery. That is also when they decide they should be making money with their great talent.
It actually has gotten pretty easy to get a decent shot.
It is still really really hard to get a really good shot.
Many can not tell the difference.
gary
Spot on.
And you can always fix it/change it in post! :eek::rolleyes:
 

JLH

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Jan 28, 2019
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In my youth I traveled the world, sort of. Africa, some of Asia, a few years in Europe. I have thousands of..... slides! My gear was a 35mm Canon FT-QL with a 35mm. 85mm and a 200mm fixed Canon primes. Oh, and I had this full frame super wide angle 180 degree coverage lens. It was great for those giant old churches in Europe. My second camera was a Yashica Electro 35 GT, a classic "automatic" camera. I also had the low light Canon booster meter for the metering system on the FT. I never blamed the cameras for a bad shot! Today's cameras are engineering marvels but I loved my old favorites and it was hard for me to part with them after years of travel and thousands of photos. Looking back however I do recall all that time in the dark room and those chemicals and such.
Yeah, I'm happy with my new stuff......
 

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