Critique At the suggestion of Mike Buckley 2 photos converted to B&W

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Mike suggested I convert two of my photos from our snowshoe outing yesterday to B&W. I am fairly new to B&W converting and would love any suggestions you might have. My thread with the color photos
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The mood in the first (Silver Lake Inlet) becomes a bit more "sinister" in B&W; very nice, but not as inviting. The Silos is full of texture, but I do miss the vintage charm of the the old wood silo that stands out so well in color.
 
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Very nice conversion. Excellent on the silos, love the tonalities and texture in the near snow bank and edge of the plowed street. Nice contrast in the brooding sky and a full range of tones of the silos and buildings. It really reflects some brilliance that i would expect on a bright winter day.
 
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I am fairly new to B&W converting
I don't suppose I'll get away with asking you to stop mentioning that, will I? :) Your conversions are consistently as good as anybody's conversions, so it really doesn't matter that you're new at it.

I don't see anything sinister in the monochrome version of the inlet. Instead, I see the lines and textures brought out more in it. It turns out that the scene impresses me as I expected, that both versions are of equal value for different reasons.

The photo of the silos displayed in monochrome is also as I expected, a nice improvement over the color version. For me, the color of the wood silo is a problem in the color version. It sticks out from the line of other silos and its central location within the line makes both that line and the overall scene a bit static. The monochrome version allows its tones to blend in with the other silos.

If you had devised a composition of the color silos so the wooden one was not nearly dead center within the scene, doing so for me would make the color and texture of its wood not only stand out more but also contribute to a more dynamic composition.
 
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I am more of a color person
You've always maintained that, and it's fine to remain more of a color person if that's your preference. However, if you stretch yourself to begin seeing in black-and-white before releasing the shutter, rather than converting to black-and-white only as an afterthought, you might (or might not) see yourself more as a person that chooses the best genre for making the image what you want it to be.

Keep in mind that most of the problems of thinking and shooting landscapes and exterior architecture in color during a harsh, mid-day sun go away when you think and shoot in monochrome. That option gives you possibilities when you might otherwise leave the camera in your bag for a few hours.
 

Commodorefirst

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Yes, please do not criticize your conversion, well done. My only thought would be a touch more manipulation of black point, I tend to like my dark shadows nearly black, just a preference.

lovely image conversions.
 
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Very nice conversion. Excellent on the silos, love the tonalities and texture in the near snow bank and edge of the plowed street. Nice contrast in the brooding sky and a full range of tones of the silos and buildings. It really reflects some brilliance that i would expect on a bright winter day.
Thank you, John! I appreciate the points you bring ou!
 

F64

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Mike suggested I convert two of my photos from our snowshoe outing yesterday to B&W. I am fairly new to B&W converting and would love any suggestions you might have.
These two you chose look great in black and white. I love how the sky takes more prominence in the B&W versions. If you have a newer mirrorless camera, you can change the image taking to B&W and the viewfinder will show you the picture in B&W. I love this feature in my Z cameras and it helps me to decide if I want to shoot the scene that way. Apparently the RAW files are still saved in color in case you want to go back after the fact.
 
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the viewfinder will show you the picture in B&W. I love this feature in my Z cameras and it helps me to decide if I want to shoot the scene that way.
I've never tried that but I should if for no other reason than to discuss it with an informed understanding here at the Cafe. My concern is that some images will look terrible in monochrome if an inappropriate color filter is used or if the image is merely desaturated. I wonder what methods the various cameras use when creating the monochrome display.
 
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I don't suppose I'll get away with asking you to stop mentioning that, will I? :) Your conversions are consistently as good as anybody's conversions, so it really doesn't matter that you're new at it.

I don't see anything sinister in the monochrome version of the inlet. Instead, I see the lines and textures brought out more in it. It turns out that the scene impresses me as I expected, that both versions are of equal value for different reasons.

The photo of the silos displayed in monochrome is also as I expected, a nice improvement over the color version. For me, the color of the wood silo is a problem in the color version. It sticks out from the line of other silos and its central location within the line makes both that line and the overall scene a bit static. The monochrome version allows its tones to blend in with the other silos.

If you had devised a composition of the color silos so the wooden one was not nearly dead center within the scene, doing so for me would make the color and texture of its wood not only stand out more but also contribute to a more dynamic composition.
You've always maintained that, and it's fine to remain more of a color person if that's your preference. However, if you stretch yourself to begin seeing in black-and-white before releasing the shutter, rather than converting to black-and-white only as an afterthought, you might (or might not) see yourself more as a person that chooses the best genre for making the image what you want it to be.

Keep in mind that most of the problems of thinking and shooting landscapes and exterior architecture in color during a harsh, mid-day sun go away when you think and shoot in monochrome. That option gives you possibilities when you might otherwise leave the camera in your bag for a few hours.
You are teaching me a lot, Mike. I am grateful. It’s fun to try new things and stretch myself. I forget to try black and white but I do need to think about it more often when shooting. I do a lot of midday shooting when we are out, so it would be good for me to think about it. I hadn't thought about the wood silo being in the middle of the frame. I do like the color contrast of it, but if I get to that area again, in good light, and in conditions where I can get out and move around, I'll have to see if I can come up with a different composition. Yesterday, I could only take a photo from the window of the car and had to do it quickly before someone else came up behind us. For me, though, color is so important emotionally. Black and white photos often don't elicit the same response. Maybe it's an acquired taste.
 
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I just now looked up the settings on the Nikon Z6 and Z7 for displaying a monochrome image in the camera. You can choose one of four filters -- yellow, orange, green or red. You can't configure the strength of the filter but I don't see that as a problem when you're only using the display to determine if a monochrome version of the scene might be doable. (Maybe cameras released after the Z6 and Z7 allow you to configure the filter's strength.)

For the people interested in displaying their images in monochrome, I recommend selecting the yellow filter for typical landscapes and the green filter for typical portraits of Caucasians. For dark skies, the orange or red filter will work and the red filter will be more dramatic, though maybe resulting in lost detail in the clouds. All of that is in theory based on how those filters work when converting to monochrome during post-processing; I assume similar effects are achieved when using those filters in-camera.
 
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For me, though, color is so important emotionally.
I can relate to that! As an example, there is a lot about certain visual and performing arts that piques my intellect but doesn't affect me emotionally. If a particular piece or performance doesn't elicit an enjoyable emotional response, it's never going to be a favorite for me.
 
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