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auto-ISO questions from a nikon newbie...

Discussion in 'Nikon DX DSLR' started by static808, Oct 3, 2008.

  1. ...greetings everyone!

    about to pull the trigger on a D300 when i realized there was a feature that i hadn't yet played with on the camera: auto-ISO.

    as a canon user, we simply dont have this, or only have rudimentary versions of this. my 20D doesnt have this, but i feel it could have saved some shots for me, especially when tracking kids in places with erratic lighting.

    question is: is it as easy as setting your camera to M exposure, set the desired aperture and shutter, set auto-ISO, and that's it?? the camera will figure out the ISO from its metering??

    how would you go about setting exposure compensation if the ISO is constantly changing (is it easy to set EC, or another complicated set of steps traversing thge menus)??

    thanks for any advice/suggestions/experiences you can provide on the matter!!

    --B
     
  2. mattsteg

    mattsteg

    455
    Aug 10, 2007
    MN
    That's one way of using it, yes. You would set EC by pressing the exposure compensation button and moving the main command wheel. All quite simple.
     
  3. rdle

    rdle

    304
    Apr 2, 2005
    So. California
    I have a D200 and I use Auto ISO full time. I usually shoot in Aperture priority mode. With my settings Auto ISO will only kick in if the Shutter Speed drops below 1/200. Otherwise it stays at ISO 100. I pick the aperture and the camera transparently chooses an ISO using the parameters I choose.

    If you go to the NikonUSA site you can download the user manual for the D300 and read in detail about Auto ISO.
     
  4. didnt know there was an EC button. i was hoping i wouldnt have to dig through all the menus to perform a simple EC. thanks!
     
  5. kirbinster

    kirbinster

    949
    Nov 24, 2007
    NJ, USA
    You can set auto ISO such that it will kick in if the camera tries to drop the speed below a certain point. You can also set the max as to how high it will ramp the ISO. I use this feature a lot on my D40 but not at all on the D300. The D300 has a dedicated ISO button on top of the camera that makes it so easy to adjust the ISO as needed that I find it better to take control on this camera.
     
  6. i completely agree on taking control of the camera, as i'm always in M mode. that's why i specifically asked about M. however, there are some situations, mainly outdoors for me, where the lighting can change very drastically and quickly.

    in playgrounds, for example, where the sun can break through trees, leaving very sunny and shady areas. as my daughter runs through those areas, i track her and fire off a few shots fairly close together. within that burst, the lighting could have changed, and im nowhere near skilled enough to change the ISO within that short amount of time.

    i think this is where this feature could definitely help me out. shoot, with my 20D, i dont even see the ISO setting in my viewfinder, so that "upgrade" alone will be awesome for me!
     
  7. mattsteg

    mattsteg

    455
    Aug 10, 2007
    MN
    Keep in mind that ISO can only vary across a fairly narrow range of stops, so for real drastic lighting changes you can easily run into the high or low limit.
     
  8. mattsteg

    mattsteg

    455
    Aug 10, 2007
    MN
    That's untrue. The ISO is adjusted to provide the exposure given by the meter with exposure compensation applied. I'm not sure where you got the idea otherwise unless things have changed dramatically with the D300 vs. previous bodies.
     
  9. daveg

    daveg

    Jul 14, 2008
    UK
    That's true!

    Dialling in EC when in Manual Mode and Auto ISO causes a change in the ISO value being used.

    In other words a minus EC value will give a lower ISO value and dialling in a plus EC value will give a higher ISO value (for the same shutter speed / aperture setting).

    The difference between Aperture Priority and Manual when setting Auto ISO is that in AV, if you hit the limits you have set for shutter speed it will drop below your set value to maintain correct exposure. In Manual Mode if you hit the limits of ISO speed you have set you are going to get an incorrect exposure (albeit with an indication in the viewfinder).
     
  10. srsuser

    srsuser

    436
    Oct 4, 2008
    Georgia
    ISO 100-160 ftw.
     
  11. Triggaaar

    Triggaaar

    Jun 15, 2008
    England
    Where did you get that quote by MMarz from? Was it here, then deleted?
     
  12. mattsteg

    mattsteg

    455
    Aug 10, 2007
    MN
    I guess so. Previously it would have been between my two successive posts there.

    Forum software really shouldn't allow posts to be deleted once there's been another response in the thread to avoid confusion like this, and people shouldn't delete posts that have been replied to. An edit retracting any untrue statements would be more appropriate and less confusing, I'd think.
     
  13. hahahah...you MUST love landscapes...or have ridiculously fast lenses! either case, that aint me..bring on the higher ISO's!!
     
  14. srsuser

    srsuser

    436
    Oct 4, 2008
    Georgia
    Nah I'm still a noob in Photography. I just hate it when I turn up the ISO and you see all this noise in the pictures, turns out like crap.
     
  15. hahah, you can do like i do. turn your high ISO shots into black n' whites. they look real artsy that way! but since im following around my daughters inside a house most of the time, AND i'm trying to freeze action, i have no choice but to crank it up. totally understand where you're coming from though!
     
  16. latazyo

    latazyo

    Apr 23, 2008
    STL
    static you'll be pleasantly surprised at how high you can run your ISO w/o distracting noise on that D300
     
  17. srsuser

    srsuser

    436
    Oct 4, 2008
    Georgia
    When will you start to notice noise on the D80?
     
  18. Probably around 800.
     
  19. kiwi

    kiwi

    Jan 1, 2008
    Auckland, NZ
    On the d300 if you get the exposure and WB right there is very little noise to 1600, after that up to 3200 it's not too bad using NR like Ninja etc
     
  20. kiwi

    kiwi

    Jan 1, 2008
    Auckland, NZ
    Oh, I use auto in exactly the same situation you talk of, especially sports where there are sunny areas then shady areas. I put on manual, meter for the sunny bits, then let auto-iso take care of the rest.
     
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