Back-up help

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My computer is showing alerts that my b/u drive has no more space.
I have two 500 gig drives in my tower, drive C has OS and all software and drive D is just for back up. How can drive C still have 115 gigs free and drive D have five gigs of free space? Drive D doesn't have any software :confused:

This is all from the point when I switched over to win7, reformatted both disks and away we went.

this is some of the info I thought might help disect what is going on

Drive D

Data Filies back up 232.50 GB
System Image 226.08 GB
Other files 7.17 GB
Free 5.21 GB
Total 465.76 GB

Data Files
Back up period size
12/02/2009-12/02/2009 63.35 GB
12/12/2009-11/08/2010 144.70 GB
12/19/2010-05/15/2011 24.45 GB

Total 232.50 GB

I also have External HDs
500 GB Western Digital My Book Essential
1 TB Western Digital My Book Elite

I would like to take this opportunity to set up a proper Back Up

Thank You in advance
Troy
 

Growltiger

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Looks like your D drive is indeed full, because you have put a system image of the C drive on it, plus a whole series more backups as well.

I would do the following.
All software and nothing else on C, all your data on D.
Delete everything on the D drive.
Take all your data (not the software) and move it from the C drive to the D drive.
Put a new image of your C drive on the D drive.
Make a regular backup of all your data, which is now on D, on multiple externals.
 
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I bought a 500Gb drive to use for backups of both my Laptop and Desktop m/cs (OS and Programmes only).

I got to roughly 6 backups of each and it was full, so I have started deleting the earliest in each case before attempting a new backup.

Data is backed up to different external drives with duplicate drives backing up the backups (mainly images and music).

DG
 
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Looks like your D drive is indeed full, because you have put a system image of the C drive on it, plus a whole series more backups as well.

I would do the following.
All software and nothing else on C, all your data on D.
Delete everything on the D drive.
Take all your data (not the software) and move it from the C drive to the D drive.
Put a new image of your C drive on the D drive.
Make a regular backup of all your data, which is now on D, on multiple externals.
Let me make sure I follow,
D drive is not considered a back-up, it is storage and back-up is on external drives, correct?

So my first step would be to reformat D drive? I will have no b/u at this point, just original on C drive?

Would it make sense to replace C drive with a high rpm drive?

I hope you don't mind doing this in steps, so I don't get lost :redface:
 

Growltiger

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I'll take it in easy stages.

Your very first step is to simply copy all your personal data onto an external drive, so it is safe, before you start changing things. Then put that drive out of the way.

D cannot be a proper backup. If your machine is corrupted/destroyed/stolen, then all would be lost. But it would be useful to have an image of your C drive on D, so if the C: drive fails it is easy to put a new one in and get all the software working again in under an hour.

I'm assuming your C and D drives are 7200rpm which is fine. You can always spend more money later should you choose to, if you really want better performance.

You want all software and nothing else on C, and all your data (photos etc.) on D.

Delete everything on the D drive. Yes, you could reformat it. Or just delete all the files using Explorer.

Take all your personal data (not the software) and move it from the C drive to the D drive. The C drive now contains only operating system and software.

Install Acronis True Image Home and make an image of your C drive and store it on the D drive.

Use a simple replicating program, such as Karen's Replicator, to make regular backups of all your personal data, which is now on D, onto multiple externals (i.e. rotate their use, preferably keeping one backup off-site).

You will find there are dozens of different approaches that people recommend, but the one I have given you here is very simple, easy to understand, and is safe.

I have dealt with several cases where people have lost their data because they bought and installed a backup program, told it to back everything up, trusted it, and did not understand how it worked. In one case the program didn't back up their Outlook database so they lost all their crucial emails. In another case they had chosen fast and convenient incrementals, but they had got in a mess and nothing useful could be recovered. Another time a fancy NAS unit had been installed but it became horribly scrambled. For a normal user, it is far better to keep it simple and understand it.
 
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Hi,
One thing to note.

A backup can never be assumed to be good until it is tested.

And in case of failure, this is not the time to test a backup, because if the backup is bad it becomes a case of lost data.
 
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Hi,
One thing to note.

A backup can never be assumed to be good until it is tested.

And in case of failure, this is not the time to test a backup, because if the backup is bad it becomes a case of lost data.
Thanks for the heads up, Michel
 
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Ok, so my D drive is empty. I moved The three files over to external drive, although I'm not sure I did it correctly, their is only two files instead of three and only 100 gigs of storage used. I might need to backup off C drive to make sure I am covered.

Now, how do I move data only to D from C and do I have to change some thing so future downloads go to D, or is that a selection I will be choosing every time i save something?
 

Growltiger

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You appear to have moved your old backup files over to the external. I don't know why you did that, as you are going to start a new backup method and we can't be sure whether those backups are useful or not. I think you misunderstood me. I meant you should copy all your personal data onto an external before starting, and that meant simply copying the files from C, not the old backup files from D. Never mind, you can still do it now.

You will need to always save files to D in future, yes. Most software either remembers where you saved to last time, or it can be configured to have a default storage location. I suggest you create a folder on D called, for example "Data", and then under it a folder called "Photos" and another called "Documents". You get the idea.

Now move your data from whereever it is on C into the new structure on D.

Do you actually know where all your data is now? It sounds like you might need to do some exploring to learn where it is. Perhaps there is someone who could sit with you and help you get familiar with all this?
 
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On the back up, I was thinking I needed some back up just in case, just some time lost is all :redface:.

So, I got all the data moved to D drive, it came pretty simple once i started doing it. Does the desk top folder need to stay on C drive? all the icons are not on the deck top.

Now I have to get the Acronis software you mentioned earlier and create a System Image. I'll do that tomorrow.

Thanks again for the help :cool:
 

Growltiger

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Leave anything related to the operating system on C, for example the desktop etc. That will mean that if you need to restore your system image, you will get a complete working system, even if temporarily without a D drive (for example if it was a complete replacement system).

Unless you make huge numbers of changes to your software, you can take an image of your C drive perhaps once a month, or even less often. After a restore you will need to run any updates, but it will still save many hours compared to a reinstall from scratch.

I have even used this method to install all my software on a new computer. Windows 7 quickly adjusts to a different video card etc. And one has to sort out software licencing issues. But it is a very quick and easy.
 
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