Share best free fix tip ever

Joined
Jun 12, 2007
Messages
1,526
Location
UK
rear screen haze removal Nikon D300

The problem was in sunlight the rear screen was so "fogged" up I could hardly see the picture on the rear screen


I found out that if you put this or any camera with this problem into a sealed bag with silica gell packet eventually the moisture is draw out

here below is mine after a few weeks , ignore what the picture is of

I1DFHdy.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


The haze has completely gone and the camera is back to how it was originally. Yes it does take time but better than spending out or "repair?"

This trick would also work on cameraphones or anything with a display.
I didn't believe it but gave it a go any yes it does work
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jun 12, 2007
Messages
1,526
Location
UK
Mike
I have no idea, I was even sceptical about silica gell packs. The D300 just is not worth spending a lot of money on even though I bought it new many years ago. It still only has a
30371 shutter actuation so quite young work wise. I had thought about selling it but decided to keep it for one reason which may sound stupid. A pal of mime who passed away some years ago had the D200 same as me at that time and he upgraded to the D300. He was so impressed with the improvement he persuaded me to get one as well, which I did
Over the years we often discussed the merits of the D300 over the D200, so the D300 has sentimental attachments with it. told you it was "STUPID".
now use the D800 or D810 as the main cameras but the D300 has history attached
 
Joined
Feb 4, 2006
Messages
598
Location
San Antonio, TX
Something special about those old Nikon's. Sold my D200 and D300s as years went by. Re-bought a D200 a while back for my car camera. The used prices for those make for a terrific bargain.
 
Joined
Jan 2, 2009
Messages
5,944
Location
Alaska
Good tip and congrats on restoring the D300. I also have fond memories of that body.

I store all of my lenses in dry bags with packets of silica beads inside. The beads change color when they become saturated and are easily regenerated in either oven or microwave. Been doing so for several years now. Indoor humidity up here tends to be pretty low but when we started spending winters down south I looked for a way to protect my kit during our time there. The drybag/silica solution is easy and inexpensive.
 
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