Boeing 747 Crash @ Bagram

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I don't know what the engines were doing but that sure looks like a swept wing stall. At the beginning of the piece the nose was already way too high.
 
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Could an experienced pilot recover from this?
It looks like they have some altitude, that could've been converted to speed, but it is hard to say for sure from this angle. I believe there is a stall warning system installed on this plane. Something got terrible wrong.
R.I.P. guys.
 
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Could an experienced pilot recover from this?
It looks like they have some altitude, that could've been converted to speed, but it is hard to say for sure from this angle. I believe there is a stall warning system installed on this plane. Something got terrible wrong.
R.I.P. guys.
We instructed fleet replacement pilots in recovery from swept wing stalls, but started at 30,000 feet. It would take thousands to recover. With the engines at full throttle and enough below stall speed the thrust would have to be almost equal to the total weight of the aircraft. The stall warning wouldn't be a factor in those flying conditions; the crews are thoroughly trained to recognize and recover from this incipient flight condition. It would seem likely that something drastic occurred. I don't see how they could have enough altitude to recover.
 
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This whole Afghanistan exercise is a waste of time and life. As soon as we are all gone, the sooner it will revert back to it's old feudal self.
* And yes I have been there and know.
 

PGB

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This whole Afghanistan exercise is a waste of time and life. As soon as we are all gone, the sooner it will revert back to it's old feudal self.
* And yes I have been there and know.
This is not going to get into a political discussion. Understood?
 

PGB

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I'm not sure if it is still common practice but I thought that military or contract cargo ops usually state that in a conflict zone a higher angle of attack departure is used to get out of range of small arms fire etc. Cargo shift as a result or contributor or run away trim any number of things meant for a bad day. May they rest in peace.

I've had a runaway electric trim on takeoff before. The switch on the yoke broke. Got my attention for sure.
 
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I'm not sure if it is still common practice but I thought that military or contract cargo ops usually state that in a conflict zone a higher angle of attack departure is used to get out of range of small arms fire etc. Cargo shift as a result or contributor or run away trim any number of things meant for a bad day. May they rest in peace.

I've had a runaway electric trim on takeoff before. The switch on the yoke broke. Got my attention for sure.
Yes...
I've been in combat take-offs & decents in C-17s and 130s....Shift would definitely be detrimental....The job of the loadmaster is so often overlooked....
 
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Talking about the Loadmaster reminds me of a crash at Ft. Bragg back in the late 80's. They were doing a heavy drop where they deploy small parachutes to deploy the larger parachute and pull the heavy drop out the back. Well the last set of roller locks did not get flipped down and the large parachute deploy and literally stopped the plane, a C-130, in mid air sending it crashing to the drop zone below, roughly 800-900 feet.
 
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RIP

I'm wondering why you don't hear the explosion on the tape. For as big as that fireball was I would have thought you would have heard it.
 
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Could wind be a factor? Also aren't there checks and balances to make sure there won't be any shifts in cargo? If it's neither wind nor load shifts, what are the other likely scenarios? Engine failure? Inexperienced pilot(s)?
 
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A friend of mine used to pilot C-17s out of Alaska. One in their unit went down a couple of years ago. I am not sure I want to see this.

My friend Chris was grounded due to medical reasons, he will never fly for AF again. I feel for him, but I am sure he feels for the crew of this plane and their families much more than worrying about not flying again.

RIP Men who served us well, if this was military. That is not clear to me. Sorry it went down like this. It sucks.
 

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