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Bug and eggs

Discussion in 'Macro, Flowers, Insects, and Greenery' started by Yvette, Jun 6, 2007.

  1. Yvette

    Yvette

    Jan 3, 2007
    Texas
    Ladybug larvae and eggs.
    Took this yesterday and this morning there were only two eggs left.

    bugandeggs.gif
    Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
     
  2. That larvae looks quite a beast. Fortunately it´s so small. :smile:

    Well done, Yvette!
     
  3. Yvette

    Yvette

    Jan 3, 2007
    Texas
    Thanks Jukka. Actually, it is twice the length of an actual ladybug so I am fascinated to know how it changes and how a beautiful ladybug comes out of such an ugly looking insect. I have a tree that is swarming with them and I am hoping that at some stage I will see the change. So far no luck.
     
  4. tojor

    tojor

    Jul 27, 2005
    Denmark
    Great capture Yvette. It will be prettier in it's second life.
     
  5. mikebass1

    mikebass1

    20
    Jun 3, 2007
    California
    I really love that shot Yvette! Having the eggs and bug together is really great!
     
  6. sclamb

    sclamb

    Jan 2, 2007
    London
    Great shot Yvette!
     
  7. mdsign

    mdsign

    496
    Jun 14, 2006
    Netherlands
    Great pic! Love it when I see some action in macrophotos. Didn't know they do this. thanks for sharing.

    cheers, Mark
     
  8. Great shots Yvette!

    I am happy not to be an aphid :smile:.

    Cheers
     
  9. Yvette

    Yvette

    Jan 3, 2007
    Texas
    I have been offline for a couple of days so I apologize for my lateness in replying. Thank you all for your great comments. I have had a lot of fun photographing the whole life cycle of the ladybug. Right now I am waiting for the pupa to hatch and hopefully I will get to see it and be able to take pictures. I will post all my shots once I have seen that.
     
  10. Gale

    Gale

    978
    Jan 26, 2005
    Viera Fl
    Nice work
    Interesting for sure
     
  11. Yvette

    Yvette

    Jan 3, 2007
    Texas
    Thank you Gale.
     
  12. If it were not for the larvae and imagos of Ladybirds and Lacewing then we would be overun with aphids. ( Greenfly).

    I hope you get a capture of the beetle emerging. I have seen it happen, up never photographed it.

    BW. Bob F.
     
  13. Yvette

    Yvette

    Jan 3, 2007
    Texas
    I have been looking everyday and have seen a couple only after they have emerged...very frustrating. But hopefully I can stay home today and keep checking. There are quite a few that should be ready.
     
  14. I have looked at this picture a number of times and therefore I could be WAY OFF with this observation and on finishing what I have to say I will contact Harry S in Vienna for his opinion.

    Unless I am very much mistaken I think that this picture is suppose to depict a ladybird larvae eating the eggs of an aphid, but aphids do not lay eggs. They are born live and sometimes they are born live and pregant. This is why 10 aphids could turn into 1.000.000, but there again 10 ladybirds could turn into 30.000 adults.

    Those eggs look like the eggs of a ladybird to me and therefore you seem to have photographed some type of cannibalism. The white nymph castings/sheds are aphids, but do not relate to those eggs.

    I hope that you do not mind me saying this but it really has been bothering me.

    BW. Bob F.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 14, 2007
  15. Gale

    Gale

    978
    Jan 26, 2005
    Viera Fl
    Look foward to your further findings Bob
    This is very interesting
     
  16. Thanks Gale.

    We are very very fortunate to have some excellent photographers on NC who photograph things that they do not fully understand and people like Harry S who can then give them the details that makes the picture understandable and pass on their knowledge to all concerned:cool.::cool: :cool:  Whereas I just splash about and hope that I do not make too many mistakes.

    BW. Bob F.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 14, 2007
  17. Bob, you have a keen eye. I did not see that the larva was eating the eggs.

    They are definitely ladybird eggs, and cannibalism is a well documented fact among Coccinellids. Also twin cannibalism (at least that is what we call it in German language) often occurs, i.e. when the larvae that hatch first are eating the remaining eggs of their kin.
    Cannibalism occurs preferably in periods of mass reproduction.

    Cheers
     
  18. .. meaning I'm a lousy photog :669:

    Bob, don't sell yourself under your value. Sometimes I really marvel at your broad knowledge.

    Cheers
     
  19. Yvette

    Yvette

    Jan 3, 2007
    Texas
    Wow. I am learning so much. It is very exciting. I did notice that the larva was eating the eggs and I was meant to ask about that because I was sure that they were the ladybug eggs. I have looked around the tree for more eggs but could never find any. There were literally hundreds of larva and ladybugs on the tree but I only found the one set of eggs and just happened to get lucky to see him eating them. I am glady that you guys are here to give us all the facts. Thank you.
     
  20. You know what I meant you old codger!!:biggrin::biggrin:

    .
    Excellent. The two things link and I have learnt something as well.:eek: :eek: 

    Thank you my friend. We have a saying in the UK which goes as follows:-
    Jack of all trades and master of none. That is me to a TEE.:eek: :eek: 

    BW. to you and your family. Bob and Pam.
     
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