Bye bye copyrights.

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by davidwegs, Sep 30, 2008.

  1. For you in the states...

    Im not fully familar with how it works, but how big is the chance of that bill passing ?
     
  2. WOW. I need to do some research concerning this. But from the statements in that video, I need to write a letter to my government representatives and let them know I do not want them to support this bill.

    Michael
     
  3. Make sure you're adding your copyright information, including contact info (website, email address), to your EXIF data, before uploading any images onto the internet. Extra damages are awarded in copyright violation where the offending party removes copyright info. This is your first line of defence to prevent your work from becoming 'orphaned'.
     
  4. I just wrote my congressman about this. It looks very scary for all of us. I suggested that his office organize a town hall type meeting to discuss this with local photographers. I know it will never happen. But I thought I should offer some action.
     
  5. They way I read some stuff (on different websites) your work could be considered orphaned as soon as it is created unless you pay to have it registered. This could get very expensive very quickly. Of course Congress is considering this bill even though the costs are completely unknown.
     
  6. You can't even take the case to court unless you've officially registered the image with the US Copyright office. Yes, all images are copyrighted to the photographer the moment the shutter clicks, but in order to go for punitive damages, you have to have gone the extra step of registering the image.
     

  7. It's not expensive at all. Put as many images as you can fit on a DVD, and send the disc in to have all images registered. You can do them all for one fee.
     
  8. That is the way it is now. My understanding is this new law (if passed) would change everything. The registration of images would be through new (not established) companies which would be free to establish their own pricing structures. The Copyright Office would be a sideline to the process if involved at all. Also the images you have registered with the Copyright Office may need to be registered with the new companies as well.

    I looked at this, this, and this, in addition to the original posting. Let me know if you think I misunderstood anything.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 30, 2008
  9. InLimbo87

    InLimbo87

    454
    Jul 30, 2008
    Orlando, Fl
    I have a feeling if this thing passes we'll be seeing a lot more pictures with huge watermarks right thru the center.

    Sad that they're even considering this bill...
     
  10. wgilles

    wgilles

    Apr 25, 2008
    NJ
    I've forwarded the video to everyone I know. I will probably write my congressman about this.
    And good point about the watermaked images. I will watermark my images!
     
  11. I have yet to figure out how to watermark any of mine!
     
  12. Jaws

    Jaws

    Mar 27, 2007
    Columbia, MD
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 15, 2017
  13. powaq

    powaq

    130
    May 2, 2008
    Belgium
    What does this mean to us non-americans ? Can American corporations use our work without permission now ? Or are we still safe?
     
  14. If this passes it would bring down forums like this...who's going to post photos or videos? Good bye YouTube!
     
  15. Julien

    Julien

    Jul 28, 2006
    Paris, France
    I hope for all of you that this bill doesn't pass, and that the politicians over here don't ever get the same absurd idea :actions1:
     
  16. demosaic

    demosaic Guest

    Thank goodness

    This is a reasonable bill. It goes part of the way toward restoring the Copyright Clause and Fair Use. I hope it passes.
     
  17. Are you serious ?:confused: 

    I guess you dont make a living holding a camera huh ?
     
  18. Thanks, I needed a good laugh.

    Sean
     
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