Can anyone ID?

Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
21,217
Location
SW Virginia
Can anyone identify this critter? He was buzzing around the "butterfly bush" along with the butterflies. Larger than a bumblebee, smaller than a hummingbird.

I have no true "macro" lens, so had to shoot with the 50 f/1.8. The light was fading, so the DOF is very shallow.

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)





Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 
Joined
Mar 18, 2005
Messages
22,475
Location
Richmond, Va
Hummingbird moth

Pa,
These are nice shots especially with that lens. This is a male Hummingbird moth. (no kidding)
Dave
 
Joined
Jan 27, 2005
Messages
301
Location
Huntsville, AL
I guess I should have read my own reference a bit closer -- it is AKA a hummingbird moth, not just related to one :redface:
 
Joined
May 3, 2005
Messages
1,777
Location
IL
Pa:

These are awesome shots of a very interesting creature. How large would you say he was?
 
Joined
Feb 9, 2005
Messages
1,524
Location
Penryn Cornwall England
It is a member of the Sphingidae Family and is one of the Hemaris species. In the UK and Europe we know them as Bee Hawk Moths, but in the USA you seem to use the term Clearwings, or Snowberry Clearwings because the larvae feed on Snowberry.
The wings are clear because the wing membrane does not have have the attachments for holding any scales and consequently they are clear.
Note how it is using the tuffs of hair at the base of the body as a stabiliser. Bee and Hummingbird Hawk Moth species use this technique to stabilise themselves in their hovering flight
You can tell the species apart by the wings and the fact that Bee Hawkmoths support themselves by their 2 front legs when feeding, whereas the Hummingbird Hawkmoths do not have to as their proboscis, (tongue), is much longer.

BW. Bob F
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
21,217
Location
SW Virginia
Bob the Spiderman said:
I have looked at the various species of Hemaris in North America and you have 2 which are common to the state of Virginia.
Hemaris diffinis and Hemaris thysbe.
Yours seems to be H.diffinis. (The Snowberry Clearwing)

BW. Bob F.
Actually, I was visiting my son near Greensboro, North Carolina when I found these. They have a very large "butterfly bush" in their yard. I haven't seen anything like this in Virginia.

Here's another shot which actually shows two of them, only one in focus :frown::

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 
Joined
Feb 9, 2005
Messages
1,524
Location
Penryn Cornwall England
What you have here is both the species that are common to North Carolina and Virginia.

The top one is Hemaris thysbe and the lower one is H. diffinis. You can see the difference in the two from your photo. Not only is the colour of the upper body and thorax different but so are the edges of the wings.

BW. Bob F.
 

Rob

Joined
Jul 28, 2005
Messages
873
Location
Truro, Cornwall, UK
"They have a very large "butterfly bush" in their yard."

The bush is a 'Buddleia' (Budd-lay-ah). Hope I'm not being patronising.:eek:

It's one of the few things I can recognise in the garden, including the wife!:wink:
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
21,217
Location
SW Virginia
Rob said:
"They have a very large "butterfly bush" in their yard."

The bush is a 'Buddleia' (Budd-lay-ah). Hope I'm not being patronising.:eek:

It's one of the few things I can recognise in the garden, including the wife!:wink:
I'm sure my wife, who is the gardener in the family, knows the correct name. But she lets me get by with nicknames!
 
Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Nikon Cafe is a fan site and not associated with Nikon Corporation.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Copyright © 2005-2019 Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom