Carbonite?

Discussion in 'PC/Windows/Linux' started by flygirl1, Jun 8, 2007.

  1. Has anyone used this online backup service. It is being advertised by Winzip. It works in the background, backing up automatically. Unlimited backup one year service for $49.95

    www.carbonite.com

    Opinions appreciated.

    Thanks
    Nancy
     
  2. technick

    technick

    54
    Jun 8, 2007
    Atlanta, GA
    Being the "unlimited backup" for one year makes me nervous that after the first year the prices will sky rocket.

    I handle my remote backups slightly differently than most. I subscribe to a webhosting company called dreamhost, for 10 dollars a month you get 200 gigs of disk space and ssh access. I take each month of photoshoots and rar (rar is another form of compression, much like zip) all of it up into multiple 50 meg files, after that I create par2 recovery records for the rar files (Quickpar will create recovery records for files so if a file is corrupted by 2-3%, you can repair it), then I upload it using WinSCP (sftp) to my webhost into a private backup directory that is not accessible by the webserver (apache). Oh and yes I do password protect my files inside the compressed libraries.

    Dreamhosts grows my storage every week by a gig, so needless to say I only upload the good stuff. But for 10 dollars a month, I know that my costs will never go up.
     
  3. technick, I should get QuickPar or else those files I tried to upload to your server got corrupted ;)

    (is that my D2h you're holding in that shot?) hehe :redface:
     
  4. TimK

    TimK

    Apr 17, 2006
    Hong Kong, China
    For $100 or so you can get a 350G HDD. You can schedule your system to back up data files everyday easily. You can even put the HDD in an external USB box for about $30 so that you can take it with you if you want!
     
  5. Phil Lee

    Phil Lee

    215
    Jan 17, 2007
    Sale, UK
    The problem with online backup is upload speed via the net. If you have a hard disks worth of data it can take days to transfer the data to the backup server. I'd get a hard disk and take it off site or lock it in a fire safe.
     
  6. Walter

    Walter

    Jan 13, 2006
    Columbia, Maryland
    Walter Rowe
    For a few hundred dollars, you can invest in multiple external HDDs and rotate through them for on-site and off-site backups of your files. I have three HDDs. One is my master working disk, one is on-site backup, and one is off-site backup. I rotate through the three disks so that they all get exercised regularly.

    I do not utilize any sort of RAID. I use "robocopy" on Windows to sync them. When I move to the Mac platform (this coming weekend), I will use "rsync" on the Mac to do the same thing. I prefer this method because it protects against corruption getting immediately written to my
    master disk and on-site backup simultaneously. I validate my master disk before synchronizing it to either of my backup disks.