Cars and Timing Belts.....

Joined
Jul 14, 2009
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368
Location
Oklahoma, Tulsa
Well mine went after 18 years on the original lexus/toyota belt.
Thank god for non interference motors.

:eek:
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Joined
Jun 10, 2006
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Location
Denver, CO
You are lucky not to have bent valves. I am surprised at "no interference".
Did you change it yourself?
 
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Oklahoma, Tulsa
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I take it "non-interference" means valves did not penetrate pistons and rods did not penetrate block? If so, you were very lucky!
Exactly,
Most other cars when the belt breaks valves stay open so it takes out the valves and usually puts a nice dent in the pistons. I had that happen on a GM3800 motor when the chain went. bent all the exhaust valves and it just kissed the pistons.
 
Joined
Jul 14, 2009
Messages
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Oklahoma, Tulsa
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You are lucky not to have bent valves. I am surprised at "no interference".
Did you change it yourself?
I knew it was a non interference motor so i kept pushing it back and back and 5 years after i got the car My borrowed time ran out.

I can do alot of car stuff but i paid a shop to do it. It is hanging around 100 outside and i cannot do heat. Plus dont think i could have got my hands into some of the placed needed to change. $500 all set and done and that is including the $70 tow to the shop
 
Joined
Jun 13, 2011
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Norwell,MA
I knew it was a non interference motor so i kept pushing it back and back and 5 years after i got the car My borrowed time ran out.

I can do alot of car stuff but i paid a shop to do it. It is hanging around 100 outside and i can do heat. Plus dont think i could have got my hands into some of the placed needed to change. $500 all set and done and that is including the $70 tow to the shop
AND a Lexus to boot!! You did well!
 
Joined
Apr 25, 2009
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Location
Kitchener, ON
lucky it's not a Honda :eek:
Way back when, I lost a timing belt on a 1980 Honda Civic. Non-interference, thank goodness. Considering the size of that car, it seems the piston to valve area was the only spot without any interference. Honda managed to engineer out that last open area.
 
Joined
Mar 15, 2009
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Los Angeles, CA
I have an 03 Corolla which is supposed to have a timing chain (instead of a rubber belt). Supposedly it should last the life of the car.
 
Joined
Jul 29, 2009
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Location
Tulsa Oklahoma
I have an 03 Corolla which is supposed to have a timing chain (instead of a rubber belt). Supposedly it should last the life of the car.
'Supposedly' is the keyword, all chains and belts wear and stretch over the life of the car... chains are at best 150k items...
 
Joined
Oct 14, 2008
Messages
535
Don't forget to change all of the associated idlers and tensioners as well. My experience is limited to Subarus, what i've noticed is that the belt can often last upwards of 200k miles (recommended replacement at 105k), the idlers and tensioner are very tired by 110k.
 
Joined
Jan 26, 2005
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Marysville, WA
I'll admit it, I am old guy, and these new-fangled engines puzzle me no end. But isn't that belt supposed to be further forward? Like somewhere under the hood and not around the steering wheel?

Golly gee, things sure have changed when I wasn't lookin' ....

:wink::wink:
 
Joined
Jul 14, 2009
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Oklahoma, Tulsa
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  • #14
I'll admit it, I am old guy, and these new-fangled engines puzzle me no end. But isn't that belt supposed to be further forward? Like somewhere under the hood and not around the steering wheel?

Golly gee, things sure have changed when I wasn't lookin' ....

:wink::wink:
Should have seen the time the car had a transmission in the trunk. :tongue:
(helped a friend pick on up for his old civic.
 
Joined
Mar 31, 2007
Messages
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Location
New Hampshire
Don't forget to change all of the associated idlers and tensioners as well.
Sage advice. Here's one with a twist:

Several years ago I borrowed my mothers Ford Escort (OK a LOT of years ago) to go to a friends house. I got to just a few miles from his place... You guessed it. Timing belt. Here I am 2+ hours from home (and my tools) on a Friday night. We towed it to his place with his pick-up and I said I'd worry about it tomorrow...

Long story short, he's one of these guys with Chinese wrenches and sockets, one screwdriver, a pair of vice grips, and not much else. I was all day Saturday changing it out.

Then, on the way home Sunday night. Bingo! broke the new belt. This time I called another buddy with a shop and had him bring it to his place.

He tore into it this time and discovered the water pump had seized and shredded the timing belt.

That was a looooonnnnggg weekend.
 
Joined
Apr 12, 2006
Messages
12,120
Location
Central Georgia, USA
I'll admit it, I am old guy, and these new-fangled engines puzzle me no end. But isn't that belt supposed to be further forward? Like somewhere under the hood and not around the steering wheel?

Golly gee, things sure have changed when I wasn't lookin' ....

:wink::wink:
LOL:smile:

I have never let a belt stay on past 100,000, timing belt on any other, and then still stick the old serpentine in the boot. You were lucky. Glad you came out clean.
 
Joined
Aug 12, 2005
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Location
Famington Hills, MI
The worst of the worst. 2004 Audi anything. Must change timing chain before 80,000 miles. Price to just change it? About $1500. Price to fix it after it's broke? About $8500. That timing chain is supposed to last the life of the Audi. I suppose it does because fixing one that's broke is usually far more than the value of the repaired car. I got lucky. I was going to buy one and research changed my mind.
 
Joined
Oct 14, 2008
Messages
535
Sage advice. Here's one with a twist:
I changed the timing belt on a Subaru with approx 110k miles on it. All of the idlers had lots of play in them...the tensioner was barely applying any pressure to the belt. When I got the radiator hose off, I found the water pump being held in by 2 bolts (out of 6...). Considering the water pump is an essential part of the timing belt system, I was amazed the car even ran right with all that slop in the system.
 
Joined
Apr 25, 2009
Messages
1,304
Location
Kitchener, ON
Now I'm concerned; I own two vehicles, a Honda and a Toyota! :frown:
Follow the guidelines in your owner's manual and you are more than safe. I'd have no issue with stretching the guideline by 20% or so. Whenever I've replaced the timing belt as a maintenance item, I also replace all other belts and the water pump. It seems like a lot of dollars for something that hasn't actually failed, but the labour for all of that is done only once. You're good then for a lot more miles than you are likely to ever put on that vehicle.

I did learn something. On a used car purchase a few years ago, I had the used car lot (my price range is lower than the new car dealers are willing to stock) do the work. It turns out the alternator mounting bolts are part of some intricate structure. This outfit didn't get a bolt in correctly, which meant some months later the mounting failed. There was a cascade failure of several parts that all tied together. That also wrecked the alternator electrical ground which took out the engine computer due to a voltage spike.

It turned into a lot more dollars than having my regular Acura dealer do the work correctly in the first place. My lesson is I'll buy stuff as is and have the pros do any work I want done.
 

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