Cheese Steak Stuffed Peppers

Joined
Jan 3, 2007
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Ken St John
*Really think we need a FOOD forum!!

Made these over the weekend and they have vaulted into my top ten for luscious dinners!! Think of them as basically a roasted red pepper, filled with a Philly Cheese Steak ... incredibly yummy!! I already have a couple of variations planned ... such as a cheesy omelette with sausage. Hmmmmm.......

I wanted a few photos for my Instagram food feed (@KenTheEpicureGuy). For these, I tried my 6D2's "Scene" mode for "Food". I shot on Auto ISO as I didn't have any light handy. For the close up, I used the 24-70's Macro mode, which is a feature I have really come to like.
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I think I need to work a bit on depth of field as these are a little soft on the edges. Shooting at a higher f-stop (probably f8-11) would have been better but I didn't have a tripod handy. I was also worried about trying to flash something that's on aluminum foil as so far my attempts with that scenario have not been very effective. They looked so good right out of the oven I didn't want to try and move them!! (Plus we were hungry ... :rolleyes: )

Suggestions anyone?

Ken
 
Joined
Jan 3, 2007
Messages
2,992
Location
Tacoma, WA
Real Name
Ken St John
The first one looks best to me for both appearing delicious and for its photographic qualities. These photos are good for starters but you'll get better photos when you photograph food that is cooked primarily for photographing it. You can eat most foods later if you want to prevent waste.
Interesting idea that I never considered. Any ideas how I would cook something like this for photos?

Thanks!!

Ken
 
Any ideas how I would cook something like this for photos?
You wouldn't cook them differently when you cook them just for photos. My point was that if you cook them just for photos, you've then got the time to construct the ideal scene (such as perhaps the type of scene Nick suggested), to create the ideal lighting setup and to use a tripod. A polarizer also often comes in handy when photographing food.

For ideas about that, consider reviewing the portion of my website pertaining to traditional food photography: https://mikebuckley.zenfolio.com/p69984307
 
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Kuşadası / Turkey
The first image looks better to me.The second image looks kind of OOF (may be because of the DOF you chose) and it also looks too shiny. I also agree with Nick's and Mike's comments. The first one looks mouth watering though;)
 
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
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Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
You wouldn't cook them differently when you cook them just for photos.
Another idea I forgot to mention: Cook more food than you initially intend to be eaten. Save the leftovers, when practical, for making photos. This particular dish would be especially good as a leftover (perhaps better than when eating it immediately after cooking it). Cooking extra food also provides the benefit that once everything is cooked you can set aside one or two of the most photogenic servings for photography. These stuffed peppers are a great example of how that could work. The only downside is that you risk your friends and family getting mad at you for refusing to allow them to immediately eat such appealing food. :ROFLMAO:

I returned to this thread to mention this because my photos of the duck breast and fettuccine were made two days after the food was cooked and the initial batch was eaten. Ironically, in this case I didn't save the leftovers for photographing them; I saved them only to eat later in the week and afterward got the idea of photographing them.
 
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