Chroma Key

Joined
Jun 20, 2013
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101
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Memphis, TN
So,
I am new here and have been searching chroma key on the site with no real posts within the last year.

I am really wanting to do some green screen shots of my kids and trying to find a better way of doing it. My first and only test so far was to put him in front of a dark blue muslin (don't have a chroma green one yet) and snap the photos and then Photoshop out the back drop and put my own in.

If this is the best way...so be it. But I am asking the experts here, if there is a better/easier way with some form of direct software with a feed from the camera?

Here is a link to my Facebook cover photo with the final composition of my first exercise into my attempt at the green screen concept.

Click here.
 
Joined
Jan 15, 2010
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I think that green or blue screen is more suited to video production and not as useful most of the time for stills work. One problem is the green spill which of course can be removed but will also take time.

IMO there are better ways to accomplish this in Photoshop by shooting on a white or grey background and using the blending modes and a little minor masking to get great results. More complex methods such as using blend if can also be employed

To give you a starting point have a look at Calvin Hollywoods methods:

Light background
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWem0wzj0w4
Grey background
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z8V_M5sJntM
 
Joined
Jun 20, 2013
Messages
101
Location
Memphis, TN
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
Yea, I can see the spill issue.

I will try my white backdrop next time.

Thank you for the video links!
 

Growltiger

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A white backdrop will be a mistake if you have someone with white hair. Especially if you have a light onto the hair.

I have been successful with a green chromakey sheet hanging from a pole suspended from the ceiling. With the right lighting there should be very little green spill. And where there is a little - usually onto the hair - it is easily removed in Photoshop. Since most people don't have green hair, it is easy to simply reduce the saturation of green around the edge of the hair until the green has gone.

I have found it easy to remove the green background in Photoshop. The Refine selection feature is excellent for difficult edges like hair. I'll stick to green.
 
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As Richard has said a white backdrop will be a mistake for light or blonde hair - medium grey is better. Still in a studio setting you should be able to r control the background lighting ratio to make sure it is at the correct level to reproduce as grey.

Whatever method you use make sure that you light the background properly i.e. seperately and evenly from the foreground subject.

If you want to try with Chroma Keying then there is a basic rule of thumb that you should aim to follow.
Use bluescreen if there is a significant amount of red in the foreground subject
Use greenscreen if there is a significant amount of yellow in the foreground subject
 
Joined
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Messages
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Lighting the backdrop evenly is key to lessening work required in post. This applies to any colour of backdrop including green/blue screen. Also keep your foreground subject far enough away from the backdrop, particularly important with green/blue screen
 

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