Collateral Damage From Dragon Hunts

Joined
Feb 20, 2008
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Oregon
When I go out looking for dragons, there is invariably something else that catches my attention. The images below are a few of the "other" things that have, at the time, warranted the attention of my lens.... Any opinions are always appreciated.

1. Bumble Bee

bumblebee.jpg
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2. American Bullfrog

frog.jpg
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3. Turkey Vulture

vulture.jpg
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4. Oregon Swallowtail Butterfly

butter_003.jpg
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5. Oregon Swallowtail Butterfly

butter_002.jpg
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6. Deer

deer.jpg
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7. Damselfly

damsel_0001.jpg
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8. Big Fat Fly

bumblebee_01.jpg
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Joined
Sep 21, 2007
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Vienna, Virginia (Washington DC Suburbs), USA
Hey Paul,

Loved the potpourri shots here... I particularly loved the frog shot. For some reason I have a soft spot for frogs and love shots of them. We have a spot around here (15 minute drive or so) where apparently some species of frog goes crazy for a few days... and then the babies hatch... I have to get on the notification for that!

Anyway, good work and glad to see you are mended up from your fall! When I read your subject I was quite concerned for your health!!!
 
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Feb 20, 2008
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Oregon
Rich,
Thanks for the concern. At this point I am healing.... going to the Chiropracter tomorrow. All in all I suppose it could have been a lot worse.
I thought I would put together some of the shots that I usually don't post.... I have a ton of them.
 
Joined
Jul 27, 2005
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Denmark
Excellent shots Paul. I particularly like the frog shot too. I just like those guys. Sometimes they can be very loud when searching for females.
 
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Feb 13, 2006
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on five beautiful acres in Hudson Ohio
Paul, I like your bullfrog also. I hear the bullfrogs singing around my property. I do get a kick out of some of your names. Your Oregon Swallowtail (who I hope has seen better days) is called a Tiger Swallowtail in Ohio. Have heard people call it a Canadian Tiger Swallowtail also. Your Western Pondhawks are Eastern Pondhawks here. I wonder if there is any difference?

Nice bunch of shots.
 
Joined
Feb 20, 2008
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Oregon
Birgit,
The Tiger Swallowtail is in the same family as the Oregon Swallowtail however is a seperate species. The Oregon Swallowtail is actually our State Insect... See This Link Although this is a link to a Washington Page.... it is a native Oregon Species.

The Eastern and Western Pondhawks are actually different as well... See This Link.
You will see the abdomen on the Eastern Pondhawk is longer and narrower than its Western counterpart and the coloration is a bit different. The Female Eastern has a lot more black on the abdomen.
 
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Thanks for the ID Larry. I really haven't found anything definitive online to help me identify the damsels. I have been lax in getting a field guide, so I appreciate the help.

BTW: Larry, my PN-11 arrived today but I won't get a chance to try it out for a few days.
 
Joined
Feb 13, 2006
Messages
7,801
Location
on five beautiful acres in Hudson Ohio
Birgit,
The Tiger Swallowtail is in the same family as the Oregon Swallowtail however is a seperate species. The Oregon Swallowtail is actually our State Insect... See This Link Although this is a link to a Washington Page.... it is a native Oregon Species.

The Eastern and Western Pondhawks are actually different as well... See This Link.
You will see the abdomen on the Eastern Pondhawk is longer and narrower than its Western counterpart and the coloration is a bit different. The Female Eastern has a lot more black on the abdomen.

Paul, thank you.
I do see quite a difference in the two Pondhawks. Interesting.

I cannot see a difference in the swallowtails. It must be very slight, perhaps in color vibrance and variation in spots. Took this shot in my garden and it looks so similar to the Oregon and Canadian Swallowtail:

511139442_cd2a82846e_b.png
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.
 
Joined
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1,989
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Oregon
Birgit,
You're right, the differences in the swallowtails are slight, but I'm sure they can tell each other apart!:biggrin:

You see... I wasn't making this stuff up!:biggrin:
 
Joined
Mar 27, 2008
Messages
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Chgo/Glenview. my heart, New Mexico
Thanks for the ID Larry. I really haven't found anything definitive online to help me identify the damsels. I have been lax in getting a field guide, so I appreciate the help.

BTW: Larry, my PN-11 arrived today but I won't get a chance to try it out for a few days.
Nice Paul. Hey as far as a guide I know you recommended one to me but a trip to Borders the other night produced a Stokes beginners guide to dragonflys/damselflys. It may be beginner in that it does not have tons of info I really don't care about but as far as color plates and descriptions to ID I can't imagine anything much better.
I have not counted but am guessing about 125 dflys all in a $10.00 4"x7" paperback.

The good news is that a book like this will probably be on the shelf at any live bookstore.

glenn
 
Joined
Feb 20, 2008
Messages
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I will have to check the local Borders... Thanks Glen!
 

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