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Constantly swapping lenses

Discussion in 'Lens Lust' started by ultimind, Jun 17, 2007.

  1. ultimind

    ultimind

    990
    May 13, 2007
    Cleveland, OH
    Maybe it's just me... but I find myself cleaning the sensor in my D70 on almost a weekly basis. Usually a quick blast of air will do the trick, but I do find myself busting out the methyl alcohol and Sensor Swabs every 90 days or so and doing a real good cleaning.

    I'd be curious to know how others control the dust from getting inside their cameras with constant lens swapping.
     
  2. I usually take the following steps (when situation time allows):

    1) blow/brush area around the lens mount on the camera
    2) dismount lens and uncap the other one
    3) facing the camera downwards, mount the new lens
    4) cap the last lens

    I find that this method works well and I don't actually have to clean my sensor as much.
     
  3. ultimind

    ultimind

    990
    May 13, 2007
    Cleveland, OH
    Whenever I'm switching lenses I'm usually rushed so I don't have time to be extremely careful about it.

    I'm thinking a second camera body would be a better idea. Keeping my 80-200 on one, and a prime or whatever else on the other.
     
  4. That's what I do :)  But it is a bit more bulk and another camera to manage :grin:
     
  5. ultimind

    ultimind

    990
    May 13, 2007
    Cleveland, OH
    D50's are nice 'n cheap on eBay. And I have a big ol' Slingshot coming my way too.
     
  6. Firelarz

    Firelarz

    Feb 26, 2006
    Chandler, AZ
    I use 2 bodies whenever I can. Depending on what I am shooting, I will have a 28-70 on 1 and 70-200 on the other
     
  7. davidzvi

    davidzvi

    Apr 30, 2005
    Massachusetts
    David
    Be careful, don't rush too much. I did once and snaped that little plastic piece off the lens mount that tells the camera that my non-G lenses were set to minimum aperture. :eek: :redface:
     
  8. I usually had to clean the sensor on my D70 once a week -- so much I became very good and quick doing it. I started doing a few things differently in an attempt to keep the dust to a minimum: Don't change in a stiff breeze -- keep the open face of the cam pointed at a downwards angle -- have everything at hand and ready so the cam is open the shortest amount of time possible -- keep the mounting faces as clean as possible -- plus other common sense methods.

    Those things helped somewhat (maybe extending cleaning to every 2-3 weeks) but one thing as almost eliminated the cleaning. I have had my D200 over a year and cleaned it *once* and my D70 has been cleaned maybe 3 times in 2 years. What I did was stop using my 18-70 dust pump -- erm, I mean "kit lens" or any other lens that is not sealed and extends and retracts a good distance. They literally suck the dust inside.

    Phil
     
  9. ultimind

    ultimind

    990
    May 13, 2007
    Cleveland, OH
    I'm usually swapping between two lenses, so two bodies would solve almost all of my problems. I get worried about breaking things especially when I'm not somewhere safe to change lenses. Last week I was out on a manmade breakwall that's giant blocks of cement and rocks, and I came very close to dropping my 50mm F1.8. Luckily I caught it and everything was fine, but I don't always have the luxury of being in grass or somewhere safe to swap lenses.
     
  10. ultimind

    ultimind

    990
    May 13, 2007
    Cleveland, OH
    What zooms are sealed then? Unfortunately I have my 18-70 mounted a good amount of the time.
     
  11. I change lenses all the time, and I have a different solution . . .

    . . . I just stopped fearing dust. I don't even clean my sensor that often any more, to be honest. I probably do it twice a year, and then just with a blower unless there's something really objectionable that won't blow out.

    For the most part the dust on my D200's sensor does far less to make my images suck than I do. If I have a few spots in the sky on a real keeper, big deal. I'll just clone and deal with it. If I have to clone and deal with it too frequently? That's when I know it's time to clean the sensor.

    Most people are too hung up on dust, IMO.

    Greg
     
  12. I'm in your camp as well. Once a week is...well...unusual to me. I clean it when the images show the sensor needs to be cleaned. I don't and haven't owned the D70, but I have owned the D100, D2H, D2X and D200 and they rarely show dust accumulation. My view of applying any fluid to the sensor is to do it as little as possible.

    Thanks, Rich
     
  13. ultimind

    ultimind

    990
    May 13, 2007
    Cleveland, OH
    The only time that I've truely worried about the dust on my sensor was one time I had a biiig piece of something on there, and I had nothing to safely blow it off with, so I gently blew onto the sensor. Well I found it doesn't matter how much you try not to spit, you're still going to spit. And I got a tiny little bit of spit on the sensor. A tiny bit of spit is HUGE bit of spit on your images. It was hard to sleep that night, waiting for the local pro shop to open so I could purchase Sensor Swabs. I was in luck, as it cleaned off perfectly.
     
  14. SP77

    SP77

    Jun 4, 2007
    Rockville, MD
    Yeah. I was paranoid about dust when I first got my D80, which is my first digital SLR. The only time I ever see dust on my sensor is at f/8 or smaller, and against a uniform background like the sky. Big deal. Clone brush and be done with it on the few pictures I'll actually want to put online or get some big prints of. I had a few annoying ones a few weeks ago and used my blower bulb too and haven't seen them since.

    I stopped worrying about hot pixels too, lol. :cool: 
     
  15. JeffKohn

    JeffKohn

    Apr 21, 2005
    Houston, TX
    I have a bulb-blower, and use it pretty regularly just because it's so quick and easy. When I'm on a photo-trip I have a nightly routing that involves blowing the sensor off and cleaning the front elements of my lenses and filters (using a Lens Pen - highly recommended).

    In the year and a half or so that I used a D70 as my main camea, I had to use the eclipse/pec-pads cleaning techinique once. And in almost two years of shooting the D2x I've yet to have the need for it. This despite the fact that I'm constantly changing lenses in the field. Using the bulb-blower on a regular basis seems to take care of it just fine.
     
  16. Another bulb-blower (Giotto Rocket) fan here! Often I use the Rocket after processing images and noticing that there is an errant spot or two in my skies. Also I'll do a quick session with the Rocket before setting out to do an important shoot. I have never used Sensor Swabs or any liquid cleaning method and don't plan to do so. If for some reason something nasty ever decides to stick to my sensor, it's off to the professionals to clean it for me!
     
  17. SP77

    SP77

    Jun 4, 2007
    Rockville, MD
    Same here. And while they're at it they can remap my sensor so that some of those hot pixels that I can't see don't show up anymore. :smile:
     
  18. hahnphoto

    hahnphoto

    111
    May 21, 2007
    Maryland
    I agree with greg, rich, clix, and sp77. I don't worry about dust- if I see it is a problem in an image, I just use the clone brush in photoshop to fix. If it becomes a constant prblem, I send it off to the pros to fix. If you are cleaning once a week or (aagh!) more, I think you might be doing more harm than good.
     
  19. Any of the non-expanding designs will be less prone to dust - zooms such as the kit lens suck in dust because they change lengths (like a plunger effect) when they are zooming in and out, therefore sucking small specs of dust in.
     
  20. The sealed zooms tend to be the more expensive "pro" type glass -- the 17-55, 28-70, etc. Though those do extend a bit when zooming, they are either well sealed enough or don't move enough to suck in dust. I have actually felt air puffing on my eye when using the 18-70.

    Phil
     
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