CS #586 - Shadows

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In honor of the over-fed ground hog that will make an appearance tomorrow (February 2, Groundhood Day) in a valiant attempt to see its shadow, CS 586 will celebrate SHADOWS.
Now, shadows and light are the key ingredients of most images, and some say that areas of shadows are often more important that the areas of light. That said, what this CS is about is where the shadow is the subject of the photograph (or at least a very, very important part)

Some examples from my archives:
1. The shadow of Steptoe Butte in the Washington Palouse, as seen from the top of the Butte at sunset. I call this one “Shadow Casting”.
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2. More shadows from Steptoe, this one is somewhat evocative of a famous Nation Geo shot of camel shadows in the desert
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3. One from the Idaho Palouse, “The Ring of Shadows” closing in on a farmstead.
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4. Here the shadow shares equal billing with Palouse Falls in “The Monster that Ate the Falls”
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5. A lurking shadow in Arches National Park, ready to pounce!
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6. Oblique lighting raises shadows on a historic barn at the Univ. of Idaho Arboretum. The ring and its shadow look a lot like a pair of old-fashioned goggles, and the nail grows in length.
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7. And finally, the infamous “Zebra Dog” (aka, grand dog Stanley)
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Now go out and shoot. If the sun doesn't cooperate, make your own light.

Remember, all the usual rules apply...
 
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What a wonderful set of photos, Nick! I just love shadows, so I may join in at least from time to time this week.



Fabulous caption! Very nice photo! I like that the black dog is almost like a shadow of the other one.
Thanks Mike. The dogs are both rescues and on this occasion I was impressed with how obedient they remained for at least a minute as I walked backwards to achieve something sensible with the 300mm lens. They went daft moments later.
 
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In honor of the over-fed ground hog that will make an appearance tomorrow (February 2, Groundhood Day) in a valiant attempt to see its shadow, CS 586 will celebrate SHADOWS.
Now, shadows and light are the key ingredients of most images, and some say that areas of shadows are often more important that the areas of light. That said, what this CS is about is where the shadow is the subject of the photograph (or at least a very, very important part)

Some examples from my archives:
1. The shadow of Steptoe Butte in the Washington Palouse, as seen from the top of the Butte at sunset. I call this one “Shadow Casting”.
View attachment 1595691

2. More shadows from Steptoe, this one is somewhat evocative of a famous Nation Geo shot of camel shadows in the desert
View attachment 1595692

3. One from the Idaho Palouse, “The Ring of Shadows” closing in on a farmstead.
View attachment 1595693

4. Here the shadow shares equal billing with Palouse Falls in “The Monster that Ate the Falls”
View attachment 1595694

5. A lurking shadow in Arches National Park, ready to pounce!
View attachment 1595695

6. Oblique lighting raises shadows on a historic barn at the Univ. of Idaho Arboretum. The ring and its shadow look a lot like a pair of old-fashioned goggles, and the nail grows in length.
View attachment 1595696

7. And finally, the infamous “Zebra Dog” (aka, grand dog Stanley)
View attachment 1595697


Now go out and shoot. If the sun doesn't cooperate, make your own light.

Remember, all the usual rules apply...
Cool theme and awesome examples! You’re setting the bar high!
 
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My initial plan was to make a quick photo and to have fun doing it. This shoot definitely met the latter characteristic but not the former one! Considering that this is the first time I've made a photo of nothing other than a shadow on a plain background, I should have known that it would take quite a bit longer than expected and that, in the process, I would learn a lot. I certainly did!

Not having any experience of viewing photos like this, much less making them, I don't yet have a strong feeling about how soft I want the shadow to be. I certainly wouldn't want it any harder than this but I can easily imagine making softer shadows in future setups. Your thoughts about that?

The shadow is of a double teapot my wife and I bought during our trip to Turkey in 2008. The second photo I made about two years ago of the teapot itself includes the top for the bottom pot not included in the photo of the shadow.


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Mike that is very good. I spent quite a while looking at the first before reading the text and looking at the second. At first I thought it was two teapots on behind the other :rolleyes:

Well done.
And although the second was not shot during this CS time frame it is nonetheless a very nice use of shadow to define a shape in the Chiaroscuro style.
 
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