CS #643 - Your Favorite Means of Transportation

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Harking back to last week's CS, books, whether dead-tree or electronic, provide excellent transportation to other worlds:

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My favorite vehicle for driving in a circle or figure eight in a parking lot (power-sliding during driving schools I volunteer at), is unfortunately...buried...
View attachment 1633811
I store it in the driveway all winter, under a car cover, with the battery pulled.
That's a lot of snow!! I'm sure it will re-appear in a few days/weeks!!

Ken
 
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Metro; technically the local subway, but rather elevated by the time it gets to Wallsend. (Partly because the line goes up, partly because the land goes down).


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  2. Signage at Wallsend is bilingual: English and Latin:
    View attachment 1633832


  3. Nice to be in the carriage when it's raining
    View attachment 1633833
Very nice series ... I especially like #3. You'd think with rain every day I'd have a few like this ... but I never think to try one!! I'm putting it on my to-do list!!

Ken
 
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One of the more famous means of transport is Turbinia, built by Sir Charles Parsons, and shown off to the embarrassment of the Royal Navy at Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee Naval Review in 1897. She's currently on display at the Discovery Museum in Newcastle


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How interesting ... I had never heard of this ship before and, after looking it up, learned quite a lot.

BTW - is this a "full size" ship or a model? With the people on the far right, the ship looks pretty small ... or maybe it's just the angle?

I like both of the images, but I think I prefer the B&W version.

Thanks for sharing!!

Ken
 
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How interesting ... I had never heard of this ship before and, after looking it up, learned quite a lot.

BTW - is this a "full size" ship or a model? With the people on the far right, the ship looks pretty small ... or maybe it's just the angle?

I like both of the images, but I think I prefer the B&W version.

Thanks for sharing!!

Ken
Cheers Ken :D

Allowing for restoration, it's the original vessel :D
I suppose at a shade over 100 feet, she's pretty small for a ship, but quite a big boat. She's had quite a chequered history: some time after her "demonstration" had sold the Navy on the benefits of steam turbine propulsion, she was donated to the Science Museum in London; sadly they were only really interested in the engines, and were short of space, so she was sawn in half for display. The fore section was returned to Newcastle late in WWII, and the whole vessel reunited in 1961, then rebuilt in 1983. Since 1996 she's been back on display in the Discovery Museum, pretty much filling the ground floor :D
 
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A couple from the ramp in IAD...

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