CS #655 - Anything about music

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Walter Rowe
In our area Victor Litz Music Center is considered one of the best stores for buying instruments and gear. This particular store is in Gaithersburg, Maryland in the Olde Town section across the street from the historic train depot that is now a MARC train station.

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Unlike Andy's nice Steinway piano, my wife and I own a relatively lowly Yamaha upright piano. She bought it about 40 years ago before we met.

I mentioned earlier in the thread that one of the keys is broken. While making these photos of the insides of the piano, I realized the corresponding hammer was only temporarily stuck; when I returned the hammer to its proper position, it and the key worked fine. Making these photos has also motivated me to schedule a piano tuning, as I realized that I stopped playing it mostly because it was so out of tune that I couldn't stand it. Even after it gets tuned, you wouldn't want to hear me play. :eek:

Photo 1
These are the hammers. There is one hammer for each pitch (example: F, F-sharp, G, etc.). When the piano's key is pressed, the key's corresponding hammer strikes the string(s). The string(s) then vibrate to create the sound. The two raised hammers are in the position after their corresponding keys have been pressed and the strings have been struck but before the keys have been released. All the other hammers are in their resting position when their corresponding keys are not depressed.

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Photo 2
These are the tuning pegs; turning the peg with a tool tunes the string attached to it by loosening it to lower the pitch and tightening it to raise the pitch. Approximately the lowest octave on the piano has one string per pitch. Approximately the next octave and a half have two strings per pitch. The rest of the piano has three strings per pitch. This view is of the uppermost tuning pegs, so there are three strings per pitch, each string wrapped around its tuning peg.

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Photo 3
These are the dampers. When they are touching the strings as shown here, they prevent the strings from vibrating. Only about the lower two-thirds of the strings have dampers. When a piano key is pressed, the damper automatically releases from the string, allowing it to vibrate once the hammer has struck it.

When the far right pedal is depressed, all the dampers are released from the strings, allowing them to vibrate so the music is played in a sustained style. When the middle pedal is depressed, the dampers pertaining to only the strings of the lowest pitches are released, allowing those strings to vibrate. As in the case of the hammers, there is one damper per pitch whether there are one, two or three strings per pitch. This photo displays the dampers on the strings that sound the lowest pitches, so there is only one string per pitch and per damper.

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Unlike Andy's nice Steinway piano, my wife and I own a relatively lowly Yamaha upright piano. She bought it about 40 years ago before we met.

I mentioned earlier in the thread that one of the keys is broken. While making these photos of the insides of the piano, I realized the corresponding hammer was only temporarily stuck; when I returned the hammer to its proper position, it and the key worked fine. Making these photos has also motivated me to schedule a piano tuning, as I realized that I stopped playing it mostly because it was so out of tune that I couldn't stand it. Even after it gets tuned, you wouldn't want to hear me play. :eek:

Photo 1
These are the hammers. There is one hammer for each pitch (example: F, F-sharp, G, etc.). When the piano's key is pressed, the key's corresponding hammer strikes the string(s). The string(s) then vibrate to create the sound. The two raised hammers are in the position after their corresponding keys have been pressed and the strings have been struck but the keys have not yet been released. All the other hammers are in their resting position when their corresponding keys are not depressed.

View attachment 1639571


Photo 2
These are the tuning pegs; turning the peg with a tool tunes the string attached to it by loosening it to lower the pitch and tightening it to raise the pitch. Approximately the lowest octave on the piano has one string per pitch. Approximately the next highest octave and a half have two strings per pitch. The rest of the piano has three strings per pitch. This view is of the uppermost tuning pegs, so there are three strings per pitch, each string wrapped around its tuning peg.

View attachment 1639572


Photo 3
These are the dampers. When they are touching the strings as shown here, they prevent the string from vibrating. Only about the lower two-thirds of the strings have dampers. When a piano key is pressed, the damper automatically releases from the string, allowing it to vibrate once the hammer has struck it.

When the far right pedal is depressed, all the dampers are released from the strings, allowing them to vibrate so the music is played in a sustained style. When the middle pedal is depressed, the dampers pertaining to only the strings of the lowest pitches are released, allowing those strings to vibrate. As in the case of the hammers, there is one damper per pitch whether there are one, two or three strings per pitch. This photo displays the dampers on the strings that sound the lowest pitches, so there is only one string per pitch and per damper.

View attachment 1639573
Great set of close-ups! I love the B&W treatment for the shots too.
 
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Unlike Andy's nice Steinway piano, my wife and I own a relatively lowly Yamaha upright piano. She bought it about 40 years ago before we met.

I mentioned earlier in the thread that one of the keys is broken. While making these photos of the insides of the piano, I realized the corresponding hammer was only temporarily stuck; when I returned the hammer to its proper position, it and the key worked fine. Making these photos has also motivated me to schedule a piano tuning, as I realized that I stopped playing it mostly because it was so out of tune that I couldn't stand it. Even after it gets tuned, you wouldn't want to hear me play. :eek:

Photo 1
These are the hammers. There is one hammer for each pitch (example: F, F-sharp, G, etc.). When the piano's key is pressed, the key's corresponding hammer strikes the string(s). The string(s) then vibrate to create the sound. The two raised hammers are in the position after their corresponding keys have been pressed and the strings have been struck but before the keys have been released. All the other hammers are in their resting position when their corresponding keys are not depressed.

View attachment 1639571


Photo 2
These are the tuning pegs; turning the peg with a tool tunes the string attached to it by loosening it to lower the pitch and tightening it to raise the pitch. Approximately the lowest octave on the piano has one string per pitch. Approximately the next octave and a half have two strings per pitch. The rest of the piano has three strings per pitch. This view is of the uppermost tuning pegs, so there are three strings per pitch, each string wrapped around its tuning peg.

View attachment 1639572


Photo 3
These are the dampers. When they are touching the strings as shown here, they prevent the strings from vibrating. Only about the lower two-thirds of the strings have dampers. When a piano key is pressed, the damper automatically releases from the string, allowing it to vibrate once the hammer has struck it.

When the far right pedal is depressed, all the dampers are released from the strings, allowing them to vibrate so the music is played in a sustained style. When the middle pedal is depressed, the dampers pertaining to only the strings of the lowest pitches are released, allowing those strings to vibrate. As in the case of the hammers, there is one damper per pitch whether there are one, two or three strings per pitch. This photo displays the dampers on the strings that sound the lowest pitches, so there is only one string per pitch and per damper.

View attachment 1639573
That’s a really nice set of images and a great primer on piano mechanics, too! Because of this CS, in large part, I spent some time yesterday playing mine a bit. Thanks for the spark of inspiration - both the photographic and the musical.
 

kilofoxtrott

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Well Mike,
yesterday evening I was visiting an old friend of our local photo club.
We tool a walk at the promenade of Langenargen along the Lake of Constance.
And look what we found - a piano...

The manufacurer is making publicity this way. Everyone passing by is invited to play.

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Enjoy
Klaus
 
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kilofoxtrott

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What an opportune find! The tuning pegs on that piano are so bright, shiny and smooth; the tuning pegs on my piano are rusty and dinged up from the tool that turns them to tune the piano.

What did you play?
The classical shutter sound of my D3S. :):D:p
Sorry Mike, I can't play... :(

And I believe I can't call it "play" hitting the keyboard once.

Thank you
Klaus
 
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The classical shutter sound of my D3S. :) :D :p
You might know the fun Leroy Andersen piece written for orchestra and typewriter called "The Typewriter." Perhaps someone should write a piece for the shutter and flash of a camera or a press corps of cameras.


By the way, anyone who has a typewriter could photograph it for this Collective Shoot.
 
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You might know the Leroy Andersen piece written for orchestra and typewriter called "The Typewriter." Perhaps someone should write a piece for the shutter and flash of a camera or a press corps of cameras.


By the way, anyone who has a typewriter could photograph it for this Collective Shoot.
What's a typewriter? Is that an app for my Samsung S8+? :)
 
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You might know the fun Leroy Andersen piece written for orchestra and typewriter called "The Typewriter." Perhaps someone should write a piece for the shutter and flash of a camera or a press corps of cameras.


By the way, anyone who has a typewriter could photograph it for this Collective Shoot.
Fun to hear again!!
 
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