CS #731 - Negative Space

LyndeeLoo

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Happy New Year to all of you! :)

The challenge this week is Negative Space, which refers to the empty area surrounding the subject in a photograph. The subject itself is typically referred to as the positive space, however, negative space helps to define the actual subject.

Your mission is to showcase negative space while drawing attention to the actual subject in your image.

The usual Collective Shoot rules apply and here is an image (taken earlier) to get you started. I struggle with negative space because I tend to be a ‘fill the frame’ shooter, so this CS is going to be a real challenge for me. Hopefully, it will be a lot easier for you!

Have fun and happy shooting! :D

4183108200_85c69f903b_b[1].jpg
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F64

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Something like this? Red Bull race on the Detroit River. Taken with my 1100mm f11 MTO mirror lens on a Nikon D800.
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Something like this? Red Bull race on the Detroit River. Taken with my 1100mm f11 MTO mirror lens on a Nikon D800.View attachment 1676865
Yeah.but taken during this collective shot (CS) that is, between midnight this wednesday and midnight next wednesday (local time).

Negative space is defined as the empty or open space around an object that defines it. It is the breathing room around the subject that determines how appealing it looks. Giving your subject and other objects plenty of negative space gives them much more definition. Design elements don’t visually melt into a single large blob. Instead, elements are broken down into sections, making them easier to process the information in discrete chunks.
 
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Something like this?
Though your photo is really nice and is one that I would be proud to have made, I actually don't think it's an example that "showcases negative space," as Lyndee aptly put it. Your photo instead showcases the positive space, the subject. There's not a thing wrong with showcasing the positive space, of course; indeed, most excellent photos do exactly that!

One way to think of showcasing the negative space is to use it as a defining characteristic of the image. All the examples of negative space that I've seen in that regard involve photos where the subject intentionally does not fill the frame and almost all of the examples also place the subject off-center.

The entire point of showcasing negative space is that that space is in itself an integral part of the story being told. Continuing with your photo, notice that the plane is flying downward and to the right. If you had placed the subject at least slightly more in the upper left area of the frame, the plane would then be flying into the negative space in the lower right area. That, indeed, would be a classic use of negative space in which a moving subject, whether it's a dog, person, airplane or whatever, is moving toward the negative space. In that situation, the negative space would be showcased.

In Lyndee's photo of the flower, there is no moving subject, so there is nothing for the subject to move into. Instead, the negative space in her photo is everything to the right that creates a dynamic imbalance. That dynamic imbalance is a classic use of negative space.

Those are just two examples of showcasing negative space. There is virtually no limit to the sensations that showcased negative space can convey to the viewer. It can convey the subject's aloneness or loneliness, the subject being relatively small in a relatively vast scene, the subject's color, shape, texture or rapid speed, the scene's minimalism, and sometimes multiple ideas all in the same photo.

Having said all of that, I will grant you that some might argue that the negative space in your photo is being showcased because it's made up entirely of buildings rather than the sky. I wouldn't make that argument, but I appreciate that some might. Perhaps the reason I wouldn't is that I live in an urban area where buildings and the skyline are often providing the background for low-flying airplanes taking off or about to land, so that background is not particularly unusual for me.
 
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kilofoxtrott

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Hi Lyndee,
great to see you here again.

About your theme...
I've studied Einsteins Theory of Relativity and Steven Hawkins theories about black holes to fit your theme and get some ideas... :confused::cool::D

Kind regards
Klaus
 

kilofoxtrott

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Happy New Year to all of you! :)

The challenge this week is Negative Space, which refers to the empty area surrounding the subject in a photograph. The subject itself is typically referred to as the positive space, however, negative space helps to define the actual subject.

Your mission is to showcase negative space while drawing attention to the actual subject in your image.

The usual Collective Shoot rules apply and here is an image (taken earlier) to get you started. I struggle with negative space because I tend to be a ‘fill the frame’ shooter, so this CS is going to be a real challenge for me. Hopefully, it will be a lot easier for you!

Have fun and happy shooting! :D

View attachment 1676864
Pssst, Lyndee...
An empty shoe box?

Kind regards
Klaus
 
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Though your photo is really nice and is one that I would be proud to have made, I actually don't think it's an example that "showcases negative space," as Lyndee aptly put it. Your photo instead showcases the positive space, the subject. There's not a thing wrong with showcasing the positive space, of course; indeed, most excellent photos do exactly that!

One way to think of showcasing the negative space is to use it as a defining characteristic of the image. All the examples of negative space that I've seen in that regard involve photos where the subject intentionally does not fill the frame and almost all of the examples also place the subject off-center.

The entire point of showcasing negative space is that that space is in itself an integral part of the story being told. Continuing with your photo, notice that the plane is flying downward and to the right. If you had placed the subject at least slightly more in the upper left area of the frame, the plane would then be flying into the negative space in the lower right area. That, indeed, would be a classic use of negative space in which a moving subject, whether it's a dog, person, airplane or whatever, is moving toward the negative space. In that situation, the negative space would be showcased.

In Lyndee's photo of the flower, there is no moving subject, so there is nothing for the subject to move into. Instead, the negative space in her photo is everything to the right that creates a dynamic imbalance. That dynamic imbalance is a classic use of negative space.

Those are just two examples of showcasing negative space. There is virtually no limit to the sensations that showcased negative space can convey to the viewer. It can convey the subject's aloneness or loneliness, the subject being relatively small in a relatively vast scene, the subject's color, shape, texture or rapid speed, the scene's minimalism, and sometimes multiple ideas all in the same photo.

Having said all of that, I will grant you that some might argue that the negative space in your photo is being showcased because it's made up entirely of buildings rather than the sky. I wouldn't make that argument, but I appreciate that some might. Perhaps the reason I wouldn't is that I live in an urban area where buildings and the skyline are often providing the background for low-flying airplanes taking off or about to land, so that background is not particularly unusual for me.
This will be totally new to me, Lyndee... I've only briefly heard the term.

Your description Mike, is really helpful... if I can only think of something...

If it was mid-Summer, no COVID, I could think of shooting cars driving on a racetrack, into a long sweeping corner maybe. Will really have to think for this one.
 
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Empty and alone, time to storm the liquor store

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Happy New Year to all of you!
Thank you, and thanks for hosting! Here we go!

I've studied Einsteins Theory of Relativity and Steven Hawkins theories about black holes to fit your theme and get some ideas.
I've read a lot about these. Not sure it helped my photography.
BTW, the subject is 'negative space', not 'absence of space' ;) Or 'giving up the concept of space as such' :D
 
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