D200 for Sports ?

Discussion in 'Sports Photography' started by asterix, Jun 19, 2007.

  1. asterix

    asterix

    55
    Jun 19, 2007
    UK
    Hi folks, Im a newbie here, go easy.

    Just wondered if there was any general setting I should do in camera for sports, Mine seems very soft images. Using 70-200 2.8 glass but just needs alot of pp afterwards. Is there any advice please?

    Many thanks

    PS, would of posted this in settings at top but that aint been used for 6 months
     
  2. Hi, I think that you need to explain what sort of sports you are trying to photograph...in order to get any useful advice. Some sports you want to freeze the action others not... Daytime..? Evening...? Indoors...? outdoors...? etc etc etc. Give us a clue and will try to help..
     
  3. asterix

    asterix

    55
    Jun 19, 2007
    UK
    very sorry, I said go easy, lol.

    I generally shoot rugby, football and the likes, Mainly daytime, Outdoors in stadiums.
     

  4. i used to shoot sports in ss priority but now it's always aperture. The 70-200 is very nice at f4. Back down to 2.8 if the backgrounds are messy. Keep iso at 200 if at f4 your ss is at least 1/500 and up iso if not
     

  5. IMO it really doesn't matter what sport, if you have people (or even animals) in motion it's the same...
     
  6. Hi, Did'nt mean to seem hard on you, I agree with Randy to a point... When I shoot animals and people I try to keep shutter as high as possible...To freeze the action, sometimes this may mean upping the iso200/400/600 (you will have to experiment with this). Personally I dont use any of the auto settings (WB, ISO) I prefer to do this myself, check and adjust as nessesary. For motorsport I try the opposite, keeping shutter speeds below 1/500,to get some motion blur in the background, this does however requires good panning technique, which takes practice. My first time out I took 20-30 pics for 1 that was worth keeping. The only way you will get better is to keep practicing and have fun...
     
  7. asterix

    asterix

    55
    Jun 19, 2007
    UK
    i realise them sort of settings and have got them, but would you do any sharpening in camera or leave for pp
     
  8. eng45ine

    eng45ine

    May 11, 2005
    Chicago, IL
    Information sent via e-mail.
     
  9. Hi again, I dont want to seem blunt but what camera are you using..? Do you shoot RAW or JPEG...? On my D50 I shot JPEG and had sharpening set to +1, on my D200 I shoot both RAW and JPEG and I adjust during PP. The way I look at it is ...A small proccesor in a camera...! or a large proccesor in a PC, which one will do the job best...!! Just my thought and opinions
     
  10. GBRandy

    GBRandy

    Feb 28, 2006
    Green Bay, WI
    For indoor low light sports it is not....at last by my crummy standards anyway. For outdoor work it is OK. D2H would be a faster AF...D2Xs probably preferred....

    Here are a few D200 sports shots to consider....

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. asterix

    asterix

    55
    Jun 19, 2007
    UK
    Im shooting with D200, hence the title of thread. Just started in RAW but mainly jpeg. It just seems my D50 is producing sharper images and I just dont think thats right.
     
  12. GBRandy

    GBRandy

    Feb 28, 2006
    Green Bay, WI
    At higher ISO it will be sharper. At least that was my experience. The noise level in the D200 is not Nikon's best effort IMHO. The issue with the D50 is the Frame rate and AF speed.

    Most go through your rationalization and end up with a D2H or D2Hs after a period of time. :biggrin:
     
  13. asterix

    asterix

    55
    Jun 19, 2007
    UK
    well unless i can get these setting right, it will be a 2x or 2h sooner rather than later. I have used the XL spreadsheet settings now so will run them at weekend..... I shall return. Thanks all.
     
  14. Nikhe

    Nikhe

    175
    Oct 8, 2006
    Sweden
    Most settings wont matter except the Lock-on on the autofocus-setting.
    Anything other than off can cause your photos to be out of focus if your subject is moving in any direction.
    The rest of the settings is up to your personal preference.

    I always shoot JPG only when it comes to sports, well motorsports 95% of the time, and the D200 performs very, very well nearly all of the time.
    When it comes to the autofocus following the subject I find that the D200 works very well as long as the subject is moving in a predictable way like in motorsports.
    When the movement is a little more erratic movement, then the Cam2000 of the D2´s probably is a bit better, I´m not sure as I have not a lot experience in those areas ( soccer, baseball, birds and so on ).

    I shot handball indoors a couple of months ago with a 2,8-lens and that is something I would not recommend anyone to do if you want to be able to get good and interesting photos, the D2Hs would be the Nikon-tool to use in bad lighting like that.
     
  15. the d200 is a great sports cam....spend your money on glass, make sure you get afs and pref f2.8
     
  16. I believe this is incorrect if you are in continuous servo mode. Lock on just stays with the current subject rather than instantly switch focus to something else if your subject strays from the focus area. I mainly shoot action and find my focus much better with lock-on set to normal. This article from Nikonians explains it quite well and mirrors my experience with this setting.
     
  17. acena

    acena

    Mar 14, 2006
    New Jersey
    AF is great but at the end of the day you also need to be patient. i.e. do not release the shutter until the subject is actually in focus. Press the shutter release half-way or press the AF button, release the shutter when the subject is in focus. You will have to wait milliseconds. Those milliseconds will feel like an eternity in sports, but at least your images will be in focus.

    Also, it all depends on why you are shooting and the display size. personal, parents, magazine, newspaper, web, etc. Each end user has a different definition of "tack sharp." If you plan to merely show off your stuff on the web at 500 to 800 pixels wide, then you need one level of sharpness over someone who regularly shows off stuff as 20x30 prints where every error will be noticeable.
     
  18. Hi asterix, Sorry about my post last night, busy day at work, brain not working properly.. As soon as I hit submit reply I realised what I had done..
    I experienced exactly the same when I upgraded from D50-D200. I shoot mainly motorsport I use Nikon's notoriusly slow focusing 80-400vr, and looking back it took me a while to get nice pics.RandyNikonCafe said get good glass, you already have 70-200 f2.8, this should be plenty fast/sharp enough. Is it possible to post some pics so we can see what you are up against..?
    I ended up getting Nikon D200 (Magic Lantern Guide) (Magic Lantern Guide) by Simon Stafford and found it very useful, lots of tips on setting etc.
    D200 +80-400vr..
    All I do in P+P using threshold set black/white points, adjust mid greys, apply a touch of USM that's it..

    [​IMG]

    Are your results better or worse than that..? The reason I ask...everyone has different standards...

    Hope this is a bit more use than last night's post...:smile:
     
  19. Nikhe

    Nikhe

    175
    Oct 8, 2006
    Sweden
    I have read that article which is very useful to get to know the CAM-1000.
    I have tried most of the AF settings while shooting motorsports and I believe that the camera does a better job at following the subject with the lock-on set to off.
    I have not put any more thoughts in about why, I have just looked at the results.
    There are situations when it is wise to set it to on, but when there are no or small chances of anything coming in between you and the subject I find the off-mode to hesitate a little bit less.

    But in any case, as long as the D200 can keep up with a motorcycle like this one who is traveling at ~110 mph I´m happy with the cameras performance.

    RR_4626.
     
  20. Yeah I agree my D200 does a great job. I injured myself a few months ago and started practing shots on my very fast and unpredictable dog. I think getting her in focus might be the most difficult tasks I can think of for a focus system. I can get in the neighborhood of 90% of my action sport shots in great focus, but with her when she's really excited I'm at maybe 30%. All that practice made sport shooting so easy! In situations like this I found it almost impossible to get any shots of her without using lock-on to some degree. Whether it was her running behind trees or bushes, or the focus reticle briefly moving off of her. Without lock-on I found too many shots focused on the ground, a branch or the background. For all the skiing and biking shots I have taken I find a distinct advantage using lock-on for similar reasons. For more open, predictable stuff like motorsports I think there could be an advantage in speed turning lock-on off as it may increase response time slightly.

    Here's an example of a my dog that wouldn't have worked without lock on. Looking at the sequence only about half of my shots actually had the active reticle on her.
    [​IMG]
     
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