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D3 & 80-200 (pic)

Discussion in 'Lens Lust' started by carauction, Jul 14, 2008.

  1. C&C appreciated

    Thanks Mike

    Click on image for larger view

    _DSC0616.
    NIKON D3    ---    185mm    f/3.2    1/4000s    ISO 200


    _DSC0624.
    NIKON D3    ---    155mm    f/3.2    1/3200s    ISO 200
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 14, 2008
  2. The Ben

    The Ben

    604
    Oct 17, 2007
    Houston, Tx
    No C&C here... I jsut want a D3. :biggrin:
     
  3. Take mine. I can't stand a camera with poor Dynamic Range:Love:
     
  4. RichNY

    RichNY Guest

    Mike- I think horse racing might be your calling :) 
    Nice job with these and the images you shot the other day.
     
  5. dem86

    dem86 Guest

    Wow. Love those images...
     
  6. davidzvi

    davidzvi

    Apr 30, 2005
    Massachusetts
    David
    Love the second one, no cc for that.

    I would have like more DOF on the first one.
     
  7. Thanks Rich.

    What is up?
     
  8. Thank you.
     
  9. Thanks.

    Couldn't agree with you more.

    mike
     
  10. Turn Belmont 90 Degrees!

    Mike, if only Belmont was oriented North-South! :confused:  What were they thinking?

    The colors are Superb in the 1st shot; you took well advantage of the sun's angle.

    The 2nd shot was very contrasty (how well I know!), but you were able to open the shadow detail well. Nice.

    I think both would have made good use of stopping down more, especially the first where the sharpness of the frontmost handler trumps his own jockey/horse (and the others more rearward - which are oof - add confusion.) I'm thinking f/5.6 for the first to grab depth since front-to-back they are so close. I've found a single handler/jockey at f/4 works well with a clean background.

    The 2nd shot is more telling. It demonstrates how narrow the depth of field is, even focused at a longer distance, at f/3.2. More interestingly, it demonstrates how even a shutter speed of 1/3200 sec does Not (or may Not) (!) stop the cyclical 'steam locomotive' motion of a horse's head and legs at full gait, especially if you catch it at the 'wrong' part of the cycle, as we discussed at the track.

    Good job!:smile:
     
  11. Last edited by a moderator: Jul 14, 2008
  12. Yes John, as we spoke about the D3 has tremendous DR. And underexposed shadows along with correctly exposed highlites seems to be working well with high contrast shots as these.

    Yes, the first shot needed to be stopped down more, no doubt.

    As far as:

    "It demonstrates how narrow the depth of field is, even focused at a longer distance, at f/3.2. More interestingly, it demonstrates how even a shutter speed of 1/3200 sec does Not (or may Not) (!) stop the cyclical 'steam locomotive' motion of a horse's head and legs at full gait, especially if you catch it at the 'wrong' part of the cycle, as we discussed at the track."

    I think 1/3200 is plenty fast shutter to stop whatever a horse is giving us, as long as the horse is 'indeed' within this DOF(or zone of accurate focus)

    This second shot is a bit of a different story. I focused on the number 4 horse. As I analyzed the DOF in this shot, if my focus was correct, I believe the 1/3200 at F3.2 does indeed capture sharpness of the entire horse from tail to head. My focus point is to the right of center of the horses belly. However, I am still in the midst of finding the correct AF fine tune number. And as it happens, I was backfocusing by +1. This was all that was needed NOT to get the head sharp. So If my DOF was carried forward a bit more.....so goes the horses head, with room to spare in the rear!

    Your eyes are sharp John!

    I am down for the first three on Wed....all dirty, dirt:smile:

    mike
     
  13. John, I believe your above shutter and f-stop does indeed stop the locomotion. If you were accurately focused on #4, she is dead in the water. If backfocused, another story.

    Look at the focused dark horse on this one at 1/90th & F 6.7 with my Sigma. 1/90th!

    IMG02527xlarge.
    SIGMA SD9    ---    400mm    f/6.7    1/90s    ISO 100
     
  14. 'Yes John, as we spoke about the D3 has tremendous DR. And underexposed shadows along with correctly exposed highlites seems to be working well with high contrast shots as these.'

    Yessir! The D3 DR is exemplary.

    "Yes, the first shot needed to be stopped down more, no doubt."

    Agree.

    As far as:

    "It demonstrates how narrow the depth of field is, even focused at a longer distance, at f/3.2. More interestingly, it demonstrates how even a shutter speed of 1/3200 sec does Not (or may Not) (!) stop the cyclical 'steam locomotive' motion of a horse's head and legs at full gait, especially if you catch it at the 'wrong' part of the cycle, as we discussed at the track."
    and...
    "I think 1/3200 is plenty fast shutter to stop whatever a horse is giving us, as long as the horse is 'indeed' within this DOF(or zone of accurate focus)"

    I thought so too - perhaps 'operator error'? I'm trying to figure that out. Heck, 1/3200sec should stop a horse's cycle dead in its tracks - ?? Maybe not?

    "This second shot is a bit of a different story. I focused on the number 4 horse. As I analyzed the DOF in this shot, if my focus was correct, I believe the 1/3200 at F3.2 does indeed capture sharpness of the entire horse from tail to head."

    Yep.

    "My focus point is to the right of center of the horses belly."

    Focusing on the horse's belly: it does NOT cycle as it's head (or legs) do. Think about the dynamics in play here.

    "However, I am still in the midst of finding the correct AF fine tune number. And as it happens, I was backfocusing by +1. This was all that was needed NOT to get the head sharp. So If my DOF was carried forward a bit more.....so goes the horses head, with room to spare in the rear!"

    Backfocusing +1 will have no effect, IMO, at the distances we're shooting, regardless of camera. I'll state that with the understanding of being corrected. Heck, there are too many other variables.

    "Your eyes are sharp John!"

    My eyes ain't what they used to be!

    "I am down for the first three on Wed....all dirty, dirt"

    Yeah, I saw that... First 3 on Dirt. I better work diligently tomorrow!
     
  15. Mike, that is an EXcellent photo!

    Note well, though: A head-on shot at a slow(er) shutter speed doesn't fit the parameters of our prior discussion regarding horse gait dynamics, as they approach and pass. Velocity and acceleration are low in this shot. These captures require steadiness (which you've exhibited!) and nailing the exposure (ditto.)

    That's a great photo. You've nailed every critical aspect. Print it LARGE.
     
  16. This one with my D300 at F4.I think F 3.2 would capture all the sharpness too. Just my opinion.

    Click on image for larger view

    _DSC8850new.
    NIKON D300    ---    135mm    f/4.0    1/2000s    ISO 200
     
  17. TheHundreds

    TheHundreds

    379
    Jun 26, 2008
    NYC
  18. Great set of photos! Thanks for sharing.

    Ted
     
  19. Knockout photo!
    Why limit your DOF when the shutter speed and ISO support it? That photo is sharp nose-to-tail!
     
  20. Mike:
    "John, I believe your above shutter and f-stop does indeed stop the locomotion. If you were accurately focused on #4, she is dead in the water. If backfocused, another story."

    Hey Mike,
    Mine is just another take on the dynamics of DistToSubj = perspective =>+ lens fl/dof + adjust ff/bf+ ss + aperture + ISO + spot/center/matrix + WhiteBal+ exposure comp? + AFC? + pan for loSS + select a handful of other variables/parameters... and then process that glop in your software of choice!

    Shooting film was easier!:redface:
     
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