D3 & 80-200 (pic)

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C&C appreciated

Thanks Mike

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RichNY

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Mike- I think horse racing might be your calling :)
Nice job with these and the images you shot the other day.
 
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Turn Belmont 90 Degrees!

Mike, if only Belmont was oriented North-South! :confused: What were they thinking?

The colors are Superb in the 1st shot; you took well advantage of the sun's angle.

The 2nd shot was very contrasty (how well I know!), but you were able to open the shadow detail well. Nice.

I think both would have made good use of stopping down more, especially the first where the sharpness of the frontmost handler trumps his own jockey/horse (and the others more rearward - which are oof - add confusion.) I'm thinking f/5.6 for the first to grab depth since front-to-back they are so close. I've found a single handler/jockey at f/4 works well with a clean background.

The 2nd shot is more telling. It demonstrates how narrow the depth of field is, even focused at a longer distance, at f/3.2. More interestingly, it demonstrates how even a shutter speed of 1/3200 sec does Not (or may Not) (!) stop the cyclical 'steam locomotive' motion of a horse's head and legs at full gait, especially if you catch it at the 'wrong' part of the cycle, as we discussed at the track.

Good job!:smile:
 
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Mike, if only Belmont was oriented North-South! :confused: What were they thinking?

The colors are Superb in the 1st shot; you took well advantage of the sun's angle.

The 2nd shot was very contrasty (how well I know!), but you were able to open the shadow detail well. Nice.

I think both would have made good use of stopping down more, especially the first where the sharpness of the frontmost handler trumps his own jockey/horse (and the others more rearward - which are oof - add confusion.) I'm thinking f/5.6 for the first to grab depth since front-to-back they are so close. I've found a single handler/jockey at f/4 works well with a clean background.

The 2nd shot is more telling. It demonstrates how narrow the depth of field is, even focused at a longer distance, at f/3.2. More interestingly, it demonstrates how even a shutter speed of 1/3200 sec does Not (or may Not) (!) stop the cyclical 'steam locomotive' motion of a horse's head and legs at full gait, especially if you catch it at the 'wrong' part of the cycle, as we discussed at the track.

Good job!:smile:
Yes John, as we spoke about the D3 has tremendous DR. And underexposed shadows along with correctly exposed highlites seems to be working well with high contrast shots as these.

Yes, the first shot needed to be stopped down more, no doubt.

As far as:

"It demonstrates how narrow the depth of field is, even focused at a longer distance, at f/3.2. More interestingly, it demonstrates how even a shutter speed of 1/3200 sec does Not (or may Not) (!) stop the cyclical 'steam locomotive' motion of a horse's head and legs at full gait, especially if you catch it at the 'wrong' part of the cycle, as we discussed at the track."

I think 1/3200 is plenty fast shutter to stop whatever a horse is giving us, as long as the horse is 'indeed' within this DOF(or zone of accurate focus)

This second shot is a bit of a different story. I focused on the number 4 horse. As I analyzed the DOF in this shot, if my focus was correct, I believe the 1/3200 at F3.2 does indeed capture sharpness of the entire horse from tail to head. My focus point is to the right of center of the horses belly. However, I am still in the midst of finding the correct AF fine tune number. And as it happens, I was backfocusing by +1. This was all that was needed NOT to get the head sharp. So If my DOF was carried forward a bit more.....so goes the horses head, with room to spare in the rear!

Your eyes are sharp John!

I am down for the first three on Wed....all dirty, dirt:smile:

mike
 
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Followup: The locomotion won't be stopped panned at 1/1000 f/5.3, ISO 320 either. (Hmmm - the 18-200mm [at 112mm] VR Nikkor looks pretty decent for a do-it-all lens.)

http://www.nikonians-images.org/galleries/showphoto.php/photo/125440/size/big/cat//ppuser/112786

Added: Note the slight backfocus - look at the dirt+grass...
John, I believe your above shutter and f-stop does indeed stop the locomotion. If you were accurately focused on #4, she is dead in the water. If backfocused, another story.

Look at the focused dark horse on this one at 1/90th & F 6.7 with my Sigma. 1/90th!

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'Yes John, as we spoke about the D3 has tremendous DR. And underexposed shadows along with correctly exposed highlites seems to be working well with high contrast shots as these.'

Yessir! The D3 DR is exemplary.

"Yes, the first shot needed to be stopped down more, no doubt."

Agree.

As far as:

"It demonstrates how narrow the depth of field is, even focused at a longer distance, at f/3.2. More interestingly, it demonstrates how even a shutter speed of 1/3200 sec does Not (or may Not) (!) stop the cyclical 'steam locomotive' motion of a horse's head and legs at full gait, especially if you catch it at the 'wrong' part of the cycle, as we discussed at the track."
and...
"I think 1/3200 is plenty fast shutter to stop whatever a horse is giving us, as long as the horse is 'indeed' within this DOF(or zone of accurate focus)"

I thought so too - perhaps 'operator error'? I'm trying to figure that out. Heck, 1/3200sec should stop a horse's cycle dead in its tracks - ?? Maybe not?

"This second shot is a bit of a different story. I focused on the number 4 horse. As I analyzed the DOF in this shot, if my focus was correct, I believe the 1/3200 at F3.2 does indeed capture sharpness of the entire horse from tail to head."

Yep.

"My focus point is to the right of center of the horses belly."

Focusing on the horse's belly: it does NOT cycle as it's head (or legs) do. Think about the dynamics in play here.

"However, I am still in the midst of finding the correct AF fine tune number. And as it happens, I was backfocusing by +1. This was all that was needed NOT to get the head sharp. So If my DOF was carried forward a bit more.....so goes the horses head, with room to spare in the rear!"

Backfocusing +1 will have no effect, IMO, at the distances we're shooting, regardless of camera. I'll state that with the understanding of being corrected. Heck, there are too many other variables.

"Your eyes are sharp John!"

My eyes ain't what they used to be!

"I am down for the first three on Wed....all dirty, dirt"

Yeah, I saw that... First 3 on Dirt. I better work diligently tomorrow!
 
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John, I believe your above shutter and f-stop does indeed stop the locomotion. If you were accurately focused on #4, she is dead in the water. If backfocused, another story.

Look at the focused dark horse on this one at 1/90th & F 6.7 with my Sigma. 1/90th!

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Mike, that is an EXcellent photo!

Note well, though: A head-on shot at a slow(er) shutter speed doesn't fit the parameters of our prior discussion regarding horse gait dynamics, as they approach and pass. Velocity and acceleration are low in this shot. These captures require steadiness (which you've exhibited!) and nailing the exposure (ditto.)

That's a great photo. You've nailed every critical aspect. Print it LARGE.
 
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'Yes John, as we spoke about the D3 has tremendous DR. And underexposed shadows along with correctly exposed highlites seems to be working well with high contrast shots as these.'

Yessir! The D3 DR is exemplary.

"Yes, the first shot needed to be stopped down more, no doubt."

Agree.

As far as:

"It demonstrates how narrow the depth of field is, even focused at a longer distance, at f/3.2. More interestingly, it demonstrates how even a shutter speed of 1/3200 sec does Not (or may Not) (!) stop the cyclical 'steam locomotive' motion of a horse's head and legs at full gait, especially if you catch it at the 'wrong' part of the cycle, as we discussed at the track."
and...
"I think 1/3200 is plenty fast shutter to stop whatever a horse is giving us, as long as the horse is 'indeed' within this DOF(or zone of accurate focus)"

I thought so too - perhaps 'operator error'? I'm trying to figure that out. Heck, 1/3200sec should stop a horse's cycle dead in its tracks - ?? Maybe not?

"This second shot is a bit of a different story. I focused on the number 4 horse. As I analyzed the DOF in this shot, if my focus was correct, I believe the 1/3200 at F3.2 does indeed capture sharpness of the entire horse from tail to head."

Yep.

"My focus point is to the right of center of the horses belly."

Focusing on the horse's belly: it does NOT cycle as it's head (or legs) do. Think about the dynamics in play here.

"However, I am still in the midst of finding the correct AF fine tune number. And as it happens, I was backfocusing by +1. This was all that was needed NOT to get the head sharp. So If my DOF was carried forward a bit more.....so goes the horses head, with room to spare in the rear!"

Backfocusing +1 will have no effect, IMO, at the distances we're shooting, regardless of camera. I'll state that with the understanding of being corrected. Heck, there are too many other variables.

"Your eyes are sharp John!"

My eyes ain't what they used to be!

"I am down for the first three on Wed....all dirty, dirt"

Yeah, I saw that... First 3 on Dirt. I better work diligently tomorrow!
This one with my D300 at F4.I think F 3.2 would capture all the sharpness too. Just my opinion.

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This one with my D300 at F4.I think F 3.2 would capture all the sharpness too. Just my opinion.

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Knockout photo!
Why limit your DOF when the shutter speed and ISO support it? That photo is sharp nose-to-tail!
 
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Mike:
"John, I believe your above shutter and f-stop does indeed stop the locomotion. If you were accurately focused on #4, she is dead in the water. If backfocused, another story."

Hey Mike,
Mine is just another take on the dynamics of DistToSubj = perspective =>+ lens fl/dof + adjust ff/bf+ ss + aperture + ISO + spot/center/matrix + WhiteBal+ exposure comp? + AFC? + pan for loSS + select a handful of other variables/parameters... and then process that glop in your software of choice!

Shooting film was easier!:redface:
 
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