D50 & Metering

Discussion in 'Nikon DX DSLR' started by Gerald Plowman, Dec 2, 2005.

  1. A beginner. . . "start out cheap and see if I stay with it. . . "- so far 3 lens, backback, 3 tripods, etc. This activity isn't cheap!
    Enjoy wildlife. . . have a 80-400 VR. . . today met a very nice fellow while shooting snow geese with so much Nikon equipment, if they had been tools he could put a Snap On sign on his Jeep! Learned alot in just the few minutes I had to visit. He directed me to this forum so here I am.

    Ok, the Questions:
    1. Have not been happy with my lack of focus sharpness. . . have been shooting using Matrix Metering. Today tried Spot Metering and believe for shooting "birds" my results were improved. Comments?

    2. He suggested I should be shooting using 400-800 ISO. Have been using 200 with usually 1/60. Comments?

    Thanks to all who respond.
     
  2. Mr. Ricco,
    your 1st question:Ok, the Questions:
    1. Have not been happy with my lack of focus sharpness. . . have been shooting using Matrix Metering. Today tried Spot Metering and believe for shooting "birds" my results were improved. Comments?

    There actually 2 different shooting elements in this question and the resuslt from each element affects your image in a different way. Metering is simply for exposure and although I use spot most of the time, you really have to understand what the meter is doing to do this effectively. Center weighted will probably be a good compromise unless you already understand the metering function fully. Matrix is good for this as well. You did not post any of your bird shots, and I would love to see them, and perhaps could offer more advice.
    Focus sharpness, a whole different matter, many variables from before shutter release to post processing, again some example shots would help the group guide you in this.
    2. He suggested I should be shooting using 400-800 ISO. Have been using 200 with usually 1/60. Comments?

    What he was offering you here is the opportunity to get your shutter speeds up. It takes a fairly fast shutter speed for low light captures and moving objects. I would try ro use the old rule of a spped equal to the focal length being used as a starting point. (ie 400 mm = 1/500) even tho you have a VR lens, this is a good practice in getting images that you will like.
    hope this helps and if you need help posting images, we can help you with that as well. Good shooting to you and let us see some of what you are getting.
    Dave
     
  3. marc

    marc Guest

    mr ricco

    do not have a d50, use d2hs,d2x but it sounds like your settings are not correct for what you are trying to shoot

    is your subject on the ground or in the sky, the d50 has shooting modes, are you using the camera in those preprogrammed modes or are you in some manual mode.

    1/60 shutter speed is way to slow for shooting anything that moves, why 1/60? what are the conditions? 80-400vr is a good lens, i shoot with one
    it is slow, but in daylight excellent.

    if you really want help

    what conditions are you shooting in?
    what are you shooting?
    and what kind of settings are the camera using?

    good luck
     
  4. Thanks to both of you for your replies. I have been "back in the manual" and on the Web today attempting to figure out what I need to do differently.
    More info. I usually shoot during daylight hours, in the A mode, 200 ISO, if the shutter goes below 1/60 I will change the F Stop. I usually shoot 40-60 exposures and find 10 I will keep for one reason or another.
    Focus Sharpness. In many cases the bird is in the trees or within bushes. I have used the AF on the subject bird and until today, using the Matrix meter. I can see that many time the size of the bird is very small compared to the trunk or limb it's sitting on. I reached the conclusion that using Matrix, the camera takes into account the subject bird for example, but also the immediate surrounding objects. So changing to Spot, I guessed the AF would concentrate specifically on the subject bird. Right or Wrong?
    I have no problems with "landscape" shot of any kind.
    Yes, stationary and in flight.
    Therefore from what I am hearing I need to work on the following; shoot at a higher shutter speed, if necessary change the ISO until I get to a higher shutter speed (e.g. @ 400mm = faster then 1/400 second, @300mm= faster then 1/300 second), I have also changed the "sharpness" setting.
     
  5. Your on the right track by upping your shutter speeds. This will help eliminate camera shake (especially out at 400mm) and stop any movement of the subject itself. Honestly 1/60 is pretty slow for wildlife. Now on to other things your meter has zero effect on focus. If you find your lens hunting for focus or finding focus other than your intended subject I suspect it has to do with the branches you mentioned. Your camera does not know that you want the bird in focus and not the branch in front of it . Practice getting the focus you want and then recomposing the shot while employing focus lock. On my d70 it's as simple as holding the shutter button half way down. Also check your focus options, the d70 has a function that always focuses on the nearest subject whether you like it or not. I find this an unnecessary function that causes more problems than it helps. I would turn this off. Good luck, let us know how it works out. :smile:

    P.S. For more information on metering and exposure head down to the library and check out any old book on basic photography. They most likely will be referring to film cameras but the meter principals are the same. Don't rely on the manual to help you understand this one.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads Forum Date
Nikon D50 Upgrade Nikon DX DSLR Mar 30, 2015
Which body would you keep as a spare D50 or D80 Nikon DX DSLR Dec 15, 2013
Thinking about having the D50 made infrared Nikon DX DSLR Nov 2, 2013
Flash Meter with Nikon D50 Internal Flash Nikon DX DSLR Sep 13, 2006
Is my D50 metering off? Nikon DX DSLR May 16, 2006