D700 dynamic range same as D3

Discussion in 'Nikon FX DSLR' started by Phillip Ino, Sep 16, 2008.

  1. Phillip Ino

    Phillip Ino

    Nov 26, 2007
    Austin
    This was posted by someone on Nikonians, thought you all might like to have something to talk about :tongue:

    106159.jpg
     
  2. AdamJ

    AdamJ

    300
    Jan 28, 2008
    Aurora, IL
    The colors aren't the best for differentiating the two camera's but there is no explanation about the way the measurement was made (did the photograph a wedge? with correct backlighting? temperature? many other variables).

    Since I've personally used both a D3 and D700 and it is a known fact that the sensor is identical in both camera's (Nikon's own staff stated so in some promo videos) any measurement that shows differences that would be attributed to the sensor are suspect in my book.

    EDIT: I notice that the darker blue is D300 and not D700, that through me off. So there is only one faint line representing the D700 which does indeed show it nearly identical to the D3.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 16, 2008
  3. Phillip Ino

    Phillip Ino

    Nov 26, 2007
    Austin
  4. I couldn't find anything on that page about his methods. (Part of the problem might be that it is hard on the eyes.)

    Sean
     
  5. AdamJ

    AdamJ

    300
    Jan 28, 2008
    Aurora, IL
    Thanks for the additional information. It is interesting he goes into such work to produce programs to create the measurements. He is using a computer screen as the DR target which in my opinion is going to affect the measurement itself. Im sure that the ability of the screen to produce contrast will affect the measurement.

    The test is good for comparing the results to each other, but is not accurate from a standardized measurement. DR should be a measurement of the sensor, not of the processing. As DP Review has shown that the full tonal range when compressed using an ACR conversion is 12 stops, vastly more then ~9.
     
  6. Phillip Ino

    Phillip Ino

    Nov 26, 2007
    Austin
    Yeah, seems like a My Little Pony tribute site :tongue:
     
  7. Phillip Ino

    Phillip Ino

    Nov 26, 2007
    Austin
    True, Adam. Please keep in mind, I am not necessarily condoning his results or technique, just offering something for us to discuss openly :smile:
     
  8. Carebears, at least. My eyes just don't have the DR to read pages that look like that.
     
  9. Phillip Ino

    Phillip Ino

    Nov 26, 2007
    Austin
    LOL! *care bear stare* :biggrin:
     
  10. The interesting part in the graph above is that DR suffers slightly at ISO100 (which explains why Nikon chose ISO 200 as the base ISO. However, for the D300 his chart shows DR increases at ISO100 and that strikes me as a bit odd.
     
  11. Jez

    Jez

    706
    Jun 22, 2005
    UK
    Me too...peculiar....
     
  12. adrianaitken

    adrianaitken Guest

    If Dr decreases the higher the ISO then why is it strange that DR increases the lower you go ?
     
  13. Every sensor has a "sweet spot" and and that is where base ISO is normally set (ie, where the camera performance is at it's peak). Keep in mind that the sensor itself knows nothing of ISO. It could care less about ISO: Changing ISO does not alter sensor performance at all. ISO settings alter gain after the sensor but it does not alter the ability of the sensor to collect photons - that is fixed by the well size and the number of photon's impinging upon it (which is controlled by the amount of light, f-stop, and shutter speed).