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D80 with 200-400f4

Discussion in 'Nikon DX DSLR Forum' started by LaZoo, Apr 18, 2007.

  1. LaZoo

    LaZoo

    14
    Apr 16, 2007
    Texas
    I'm new to Nikon Cafe and forums in general, so I hope this is the right place to ask this question. I would like to know if anyone has used the nikkor 200-400f4 with a D80 and a 1.7 TC. I will use it for bird and other wildlife. I owe the D80 but not the 200-400 yet. Is there a better option out there?

    I presently own a D70s, D80, 18-200, 80-400, 35-70, 35-135,and many older non AF lenses.

    Any help would be appeciated
     
  2. LaZoo

    LaZoo

    14
    Apr 16, 2007
    Texas
    WOW, I quess this must not be the place to ask my question. Nearly 40 people have viewed this tread and no comments.
     
  3. I am not answering your question because I don't know the answer. However, you might have better results asking in the LENS LUST section.
     
  4. Doug

    Doug

    Jan 17, 2006
    East TN
    Well, other than it being like pairing tinkerbell with Godzilla, the results will probably be ok. I mean you mate a 10.2 mpx camera with world class glass, your going to get results that should be top shelf, relative to skill level.

    But then you could also achieve reasonable results from a lesser distance with a 300 F4 for example as a lens that would be a better mate for the D80 size wise. I'm thinking balance here. The 200-400VR is a monstrous lens, and your going to be balancing lens only with a little camera dangling off the end is all...
     
  5. There is always a better option.....just ask any group of people and everyone will have a different opinion, It all comes down to skill and budget.....some folks have both, some have neither,.....most of us have one or the other!:biggrin:

    When you match a good camera with good glass you always have the potential for great pictures.......it will mostly be you that limits quality

    Mike
     
  6. Gale

    Gale

    978
    Jan 26, 2005
    Viera Fl
    I am strongly thinking a D2 type camera
    The price of a better camera surely is not the issue here, if you can buy a 200-400 VR
    I personally would recommend a D200 or a D2X (s) D2h(s)
     
  7. LaZoo

    LaZoo

    14
    Apr 16, 2007
    Texas
    Thanks to all. I knew there were so photographers out there. I apologize, maybe this question should have been asked in Lens Lust.
    As far as the d2 series camera- I have bought a D70s and a D80 in the last 18months. Its hard to tell quality in a store, so I have been working my way up the chain trying to match quality with budget. I can see now that I might need a D200 although I have been asked to do an exhibit of about 25 images in Louisiana all shot with a D70s or the D80.
    I have decided to get better glass and wait on a camera(D200s or D3X??
    Again, I am new to digital, so when I figure out how to post images in a gallery or forum I will share with all. I can't wait to see all of your images.

    Thanks for putting up with a newbie
     
  8. Cschend

    Cschend

    58
    Apr 1, 2007
    SLC, Utah
    I just got the exact same setup - D80 w/200-400 +1.7TC. The weather here has been miserable so I have yet to try it out. I too am collecting glass, and when the budget recovers, the D2x (or D3x) is on my wishlist. I have to wonder if it is worth bothering with the D200 since it too is a 10.2mpx. My next purchase this week will be a new tripod and head to hold the bazooka.
    I'm not sure why the d80 with the 200-400 is considered a mismatch... Is the d80 that inferior?
     
  9. LaZoo

    LaZoo

    14
    Apr 16, 2007
    Texas
    I dont think it is inferior at all. I have friends that shoot D200 and D2X and if we shoot a scene with the same lens and same settings it is hard to tell which is better. The difference is options -like fps which might allow you to capture an image you might have missed with the D80 since it has a slower fps. It would be nice to have all the bells and whistles but you pay greatly for them and in 12 to 18 months there are new ones you will want.
    I would like to hear how you like the 200-400 w/1.7 when you get to shoot with it. I haven't bought mine yet but I am so close.
    Skeeter

    4/23/2007 I bought the 200-400 today. I said I was close.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 23, 2007
  10. two slow

    two slow

    894
    Apr 22, 2006
    Talladega, Al
    I don't think they meant that it is inferior as far as quality of the out put but more having a $5000 pro lens hooked to a $900 consumer body.
     
  11. LaZoo

    LaZoo

    14
    Apr 16, 2007
    Texas
    If the quality is good, Who cares?
     
  12. I would be concerned about the lens mount and the pressure of the weight of that 200-400mm lens on the D80. The D200 and the D2H(s) and D2X(s) are all designed to be used with the long, heavy lenses. The D40, D50, D70(s) and D80 are all considered "consumer" DSLRs and therefore are not as solidly constructed because the assumption is that most owners of those cameras are not going to be getting into the heavy-duty stuff. I have the D40 and the D80, as well as the D200 and the D2Xs, and I can tell you that I would NEVER put any of my long, heavy lenses (don't have the 200-400, but do have the 300mm f/4, 300mm f/2.8 and the 200mm f/2) on either the D40 or the D80. Has nothing to do with the quality of images or anything else, it has to do with logistics and concerns about the ability of those two bodies to withstand the weight of longer lenses.
     
  13. Cschend

    Cschend

    58
    Apr 1, 2007
    SLC, Utah
    In my case, I carry the lens which happens to have a camera attached. Seldom if ever do I allow the camera to carry the weight of the lens so hopefully it will hold up until I can afford a pro CAMERA. As long as my pictures come out good, I am happy.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 26, 2007
  14. I always support camera and lens together -- never carry the camera body with the lens dangling from it or conversely the lens with the camera body dangling from it. The longer lenses, of course, have the lens collar with tripod connection, but still there is a certain amount of tension created between camera body/mount/lens when mounted on a tripod ballhead or gimbal head....

    You will need a good sturdy tripod for that 200-400mm lens! Don't try to stint on it. A Wimberley or other brand of gimbal head would actually be preferable to using a ballhead, too, when shooting wildlife and birds. Just a suggestion....
     
  15. If you go to a Giants game......you will find many pros on the sideline with great big white lenses, however you would be real surprised to see what's hanging off of them. Many are even using Digital Rebels.....

    Always invest in glass, and it will hold it's value, however since the digital age bodies seem to have a 1-2 year lifespan.

    GenoP
     
  16. LaZoo

    LaZoo

    14
    Apr 16, 2007
    Texas
    I question whether a big lens would pull out of a camera body. I called Nikon and they said they always warn of this due to the plastic bodys vs the metal bodys, but practically speaking they have rarely if ever seen this happening from just holding the lens/camera combo by the camera only. I did a test I would not recommend to anyone. I tripped coming do my stairs with my D80 with 80-400 attached. I caught my self but not my camera and lens. The camera was fine. The lens broke where the lens connects to its mount, not where the lens connects to the camera. Granted the 80-400 is no 200-400, but I think it shows that the weakest point may be in the lens not the camera. The Nikon tech support agreed and said it would probably depend on which part of the camera/lens hit the ground first. I agreed. So if a 6 foot drop did not hurt the camera, this "consumer" camera is very tough. I think no matter which camera body you use you should carry it with care and support both lens and camera. Certainly mount it by the lens foot and not the camera. and don't trip down stairs.
     
  17. Expect that using the 1.7 with the 200-400 will slow down AF, and remember as well that you are going to lose a stop and a half of light, which will also affect your AF. Learn the foibles of VR, if you ride the shutter button, don't forget the settle time, you can inadvertently end up out-of-focus if you are not careful, especially if you do focus and recompose. I use the AF-On button on the D200 constantly, which helps to avoid this. My wife, who uses the lens as well, does not like using AF-On, and she gets good results as well.

    As to this notion of body matched to "pro" glass, personally I have used the "pro" lenses with D2H, D200 (with and without MB-D200) and D70, and the only difference is how I have to balance the rig on my tripod. Now, you WILL see differences in handling as you move "up" the body chain, mainly in how well they will drive the AF on the 200-400, but that is also the case on every lens.

    Which brings up the use of the lens. I quite often handhold the lens on my 2nd body while I have the other body with a 400 f2.8 on the tripod. It is heavy, takes practice, a lot of practice, so don't be discouraged. If you are tripod mounting, be sure you have a solid one. This combo generaly sat on a Gitzo 1228 with a Jobu Designs Jr. Compact Gimbal attached. Your freedom of movement and stablity of the lens/camera combo will be far superior with a gimbal of some type versus a ballhead.

    As to "better", well, of course there are. For reach and quickness of AF, a 400mm f2.8 mated with the 1.7 is "better". For more reach, a 600mm f4 with a 1.4 is "better". Then you get to the Sigma 300-800 and the 800, and for reach they are OBVIOUSLY better :biggrin: And all of those will focus faster than the 200-400 with the 1.7 TC. If you are shooting static subjects, no big deal, but if you want flight shots, be prepared.
     
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