Disaster narrowly averted

Discussion in 'General Technical Discussion' started by SP77, Jul 3, 2007.

  1. SP77

    SP77

    Jun 4, 2007
    Rockville, MD
    My 160 GB External Seagate drive crashed. The thing didn't fail completely. I think the FAT tables just got corrupted because it would no longer mount yet the drive appeared in Disk Utility, but it lost the drive title (defaulted to disk2s1 or something) and Mac OS said "unreadable". I still had it in FAT32 format from my PC days and just kept on using it on the Mac Mini. Anyhow, just the other week I had picked up a 500 GB Western Digital external drive from Costco for $169. It was sitting on the floor for a week doing nothing, and then I finally hooked it up this weekend and had enough sense to run a full backup of everything. THANK GOD! Because just last night is when the Seagate took a crap! I reformatted it to Mac OS and am running a restore from the WD500 right now.

    It wouldn't have been a complete disaster. I have duplicated DVD backups of everything including one off-site, but a few months out of date. I would have lost a lot of nice pictures of my 3 month old little girl, but I've been keeping up with getting stuff on my Fotki albums so at least I would have still had all the best stuff, but would have lost some of the more intimate/private stuff that didn't go online.

    So, disaster averted. Phweew! I have yet to lose a single bit of data, and yes I've had drives crash before. :biggrin:

    This weekend's project is to run yet another DVD backup (DVD+R DL) of everything to put in the fire safe that I just got since my other one is filled and I don't have enough space. :smile:
     
  2. Steve, you can download a free utility from Seagate's website (SeaTools) that will test the drive for you and give you a complete report on what it finds. In my own personal experience, once a drive seems to have somehow corrupted itself for no apparent reason, it "usually" is a sign of impending failure of the drive. Not always, but better safe than sorry especially when it comes to images that cannot be replaced.

    Personally, I wouldn't use the drive again. If SeaTools does report a problem, "most" newer Seagate drives do come with a five year warranty. I believe you can just enter the serial number of the drive on Seagate's website and it will tell you what the warranty position is on the drive. Of course though they probably will only replace the drive if a SeaTools report shows a problem (but never hurts to call them and explain what happened). Even if SeaTools says the drive is ok I would still be looking to get rid of it at this point. Just my two cents worth and cheers eh!
     
  3. SP77

    SP77

    Jun 4, 2007
    Rockville, MD
    Thanks for the tip, James. I'll definitely check that out. It's an older drive but really hasn't gotten a lot of use other than just switching it on for occasional backups, so I think it's probably ok. And I've seen some odd behavior from Mac OS writing/reading to FAT32 thumb drives also, so I'm not surprised. The reason I haven't used it much is because it was just plain too noisy to run all the time, and Windoze was never smart enough to properly put it in sleep mode, and bring it back up properly out of sleep. Mac is much better. :biggrin:
     
  4. SP77

    SP77

    Jun 4, 2007
    Rockville, MD
    Looks like all of the Seagate diagnostic tools are Windows or Linux only. No Mac OS support.:frown: