Disgusting

Joined
Jul 6, 2011
Messages
560
Location
Denmark
I have been considering to give up for a while. It's disgusting, unhealthy and extremely expensive where I live. Well I guess this applies for most of the world. :smile:

I have been calculating that I could buy 1 x 70-200 f/2.8VRii approximately every 1.5 years for the same cost of continuing this habit.

What do you think, keep on doing it or extend my lens collection?
8707248805_f124f884e0_b.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 
Joined
Jun 15, 2008
Messages
4,069
Location
Bellingham, WA
You are asking a woman who gave them up when she was a LOT younger in order to buy records :) You probably don't even remember records. When I decided to go back to college at the age of 20, it was either cigarettes or records. The music won, and I'm so happy it did. Give it up now while you are young. If you need any more convincing, visit a place where people have lung cancer.

BTW, I'm the only one in my family who gave it up. My younger sister continued to smoke and died in 2002 at the age of 48 of cancer.

Give it up now! Get those lenses and you'll be healthy and can be the best photographer you can be :)

Carole
 
Joined
Nov 14, 2006
Messages
5,620
Location
Winnipeg, Canada
I don't think you need anyone else to tell you what to do; you already know.

Someone I knew took the money he would have spent on cigarettes every day or two and put it in a jar till he had enough to buy something he wanted, The filling jar marked his progress as a non-smoker.

Good luck
Larry
 
Joined
Feb 8, 2010
Messages
392
Location
Lansing, MI
Lenses won't give you cancer :D

I don't know how much cigarettes cost in Denmark, but when my husband's uncle in the UK gave up smoking (and he was a HEAVY smoker), the savings were more than his mortgage payment.
 
Joined
Sep 18, 2007
Messages
2,873
Location
London
'Considering' giving up means you are not ready so probably shouldn't even try. You have to want to give up. I smoked for 20 years and my half hearted attempts were always a failure. I gave up almost by accident in the end and when I was least expecting it but I had really wanted to for some time. Every once in a while I buy myself something I know I would not have been able to afford if I was still spending ten pounds a day on tobacco. I am now one of the annoyingly passionate ex-smokers I used to loathe when I was still smoking :biggrin:

You won't definitely get cancer by the way (although my dad got cancer of the bladder from smoking and you really don't want that one I can tell you), or even lung disease - some people smoke 60 a day from age 14 and die in their 80's from old age. But if nothing else, and again I say this as an ex smoker who really had no idea at the time - you STINK!!!!! :Smoking:
 
Joined
Feb 7, 2005
Messages
1,027
Location
Annandale, VA
All good advice. My grandfather lost one lung and part of the other, then his right arm and finally shoulder before he died from cancer from smoking. My father in law never reached 65 and died of throat cancer, also from smoking. He was about 80# his last few months. I'll keep you in my prayers.
 
Joined
Jan 17, 2006
Messages
7,892
Location
East TN
I always told myself I wanted to quit years ago, but I never even paid it lip service. I mean I never made it over athe length of a movie without smoking. For me, when my Dad was sick in the hospital, I smoked more than I ever had, due to nerves, being so scared about losing my Dad, which we knew was going to happen. It was being there though late one night I went down for a smoke, and there was a guy in a gown, hooked up to a handheld device connected to his chest, and he was out there in the night, smoking. The one thing his Dr had told him not to do. I made up my mind that night, that I did not want to be that guy. Not if I could help it.

I knew I couldn't quit with the stress I was under at that time. But 2 weeks after my Dad passed away, I set a quit date, I bought the patch, and I threw away every smoke in the house one night, the next day I put the patch on and didn't plan to look back. I made it two weeks until I got my patch schedule messed up, and caved and went and bought cigs. I smoked 8 of them that day. Oh it felt so good, and oh it felt so bad. I went to bed that night, anda layed there thinking about thsoe smokes on the counter. I got up out of bed, went into the kitchen, poured those 12 cigs out on the counter, took them in my hand, and crushed the things to pieces. I put them in the trash, and I never looked back. That was 9 years ago last Friday that I first quit. I still count that as my quit date. I think that my Dad gave me a little bit of his strength before he died. He was a very strong man, much stronger than I. I think he had to have given me some of that strength, for me to accomplish what I did. But that's my Dad, he was always so unselfish. He always thought of others before himself.

I'm an Ex smoker, and I ain't a goin' back!

Doug
 
Joined
Jan 2, 2012
Messages
7,688
Location
British Columbia
10 years without a cig. And I still want one every time I have a beer.
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2011
Messages
560
Location
Denmark
You are asking a woman who gave them up when she was a LOT younger in order to buy records :) You probably don't even remember records. When I decided to go back to college at the age of 20, it was either cigarettes or records. The music won, and I'm so happy it did. Give it up now while you are young. If you need any more convincing, visit a place where people have lung cancer.

BTW, I'm the only one in my family who gave it up. My younger sister continued to smoke and died in 2002 at the age of 48 of cancer.

Give it up now! Get those lenses and you'll be healthy and can be the best photographer you can be :)

Carole

The sad thing is that I am 45 years old and have a lot of records (LP's). Thank you for telling your story!

I don't think you need anyone else to tell you what to do; you already know.

Someone I knew took the money he would have spent on cigarettes every day or two and put it in a jar till he had enough to buy something he wanted, The filling jar marked his progress as a non-smoker.

Good luck
Larry

Can't argue with that!

Lenses won't give you cancer :D

I don't know how much cigarettes cost in Denmark, but when my husband's uncle in the UK gave up smoking (and he was a HEAVY smoker), the savings were more than his mortgage payment.

'Considering' giving up means you are not ready so probably shouldn't even try. You have to want to give up. I smoked for 20 years and my half hearted attempts were always a failure. I gave up almost by accident in the end and when I was least expecting it but I had really wanted to for some time. Every once in a while I buy myself something I know I would not have been able to afford if I was still spending ten pounds a day on tobacco. I am now one of the annoyingly passionate ex-smokers I used to loathe when I was still smoking :biggrin:

You won't definitely get cancer by the way (although my dad got cancer of the bladder from smoking and you really don't want that one I can tell you), or even lung disease - some people smoke 60 a day from age 14 and die in their 80's from old age. But if nothing else, and again I say this as an ex smoker who really had no idea at the time - you STINK!!!!! :Smoking:

I have just signed a second mortgage as I am doing a house extension due to a family expansion. Thanks.

Give it up....you will get a lot more from it than new lenses.

I know!

All good advice. My grandfather lost one lung and part of the other, then his right arm and finally shoulder before he died from cancer from smoking. My father in law never reached 65 and died of throat cancer, also from smoking. He was about 80# his last few months. I'll keep you in my prayers.

My father (74 years) was just diagnosed with a 60-70% lung capacity due to smoking since he was 16. He used to do a lot of exercise (biking, swinming, football etc.), I always admired that as a child. I refuse to end up this way! Thank you Rich.
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2011
Messages
560
Location
Denmark
I always told myself I wanted to quit years ago, but I never even paid it lip service. I mean I never made it over athe length of a movie without smoking. For me, when my Dad was sick in the hospital, I smoked more than I ever had, due to nerves, being so scared about losing my Dad, which we knew was going to happen. It was being there though late one night I went down for a smoke, and there was a guy in a gown, hooked up to a handheld device connected to his chest, and he was out there in the night, smoking. The one thing his Dr had told him not to do. I made up my mind that night, that I did not want to be that guy. Not if I could help it.

I knew I couldn't quit with the stress I was under at that time. But 2 weeks after my Dad passed away, I set a quit date, I bought the patch, and I threw away every smoke in the house one night, the next day I put the patch on and didn't plan to look back. I made it two weeks until I got my patch schedule messed up, and caved and went and bought cigs. I smoked 8 of them that day. Oh it felt so good, and oh it felt so bad. I went to bed that night, anda layed there thinking about thsoe smokes on the counter. I got up out of bed, went into the kitchen, poured those 12 cigs out on the counter, took them in my hand, and crushed the things to pieces. I put them in the trash, and I never looked back. That was 9 years ago last Friday that I first quit. I still count that as my quit date. I think that my Dad gave me a little bit of his strength before he died. He was a very strong man, much stronger than I. I think he had to have given me some of that strength, for me to accomplish what I did. But that's my Dad, he was always so unselfish. He always thought of others before himself.

I'm an Ex smoker, and I ain't a goin' back!

Doug

This is the kind of real life stories I need in order to progress. My wife is a nurse and I have 3 small children that constantly tells me they don't want me to die. This hurts too much for me to ignore. Thank you for telling your story!
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2011
Messages
560
Location
Denmark
10 years without a cig. And I still want one every time I have a beer.

Not what I was hoping for, but I thank you for your honesty! :smile:

I have been given up in the past, my record is 9 months. Maybe it is easier just to give up smoking and drinking beer at the same time then?

More time to take photographs I suppose?
 
Joined
Jan 2, 2012
Messages
7,688
Location
British Columbia
Not what I was hoping for, but I thank you for your honesty! :smile:

I have been given up in the past, my record is 9 months. Maybe it is easier just to give up smoking and drinking beer at the same time then?

More time to take photographs I suppose?

My son is 10 years old, I did it for him when he was born.

It should be a no-brainer having 3 kids, your' also infecting them with second hand smoke.

** drink a glass of water everytime you want cig, worked for me.
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2011
Messages
560
Location
Denmark
My son is 10 years old, I did it for him when he was born.

It should be a no-brainer having 3 kids, your' also infecting them with second hand smoke.

** drink a glass of water everytime you want cig, worked for me.

I must admit I think I started smoking more after the kids were born. Gave me some some personal space alone outside in the garage i guess. (I know just another bad excuse).

I have never smoked inside the house of course (just to keep the records straight). In the winter an additional health hazard is getting pneumonia, I now the particles still sits in your clothes, so I am no saint.

Come to think of it, the real danger of smoking compared to other usage of drugs and drinks, is that you can function normally and live a normal work and family life without anybody noticing (except for the smell). I guess the trick is to admit that I am an addict.

Can the body contain this much water?
 
Joined
Nov 19, 2011
Messages
7,328
Location
Central California
yea all the bad stuff yata yata, but when your ready you can and will do it, I tried 45 times, then with a little acupuncture double density method, secreted my endorphins, smoking was not important anymore, I cam smell better breath better, and endurance is stronger, just think............you are NOT depriving yourself, you are benefiting. :866:
 
Joined
Jun 15, 2008
Messages
4,069
Location
Bellingham, WA
This is the kind of real life stories I need in order to progress. My wife is a nurse and I have 3 small children that constantly tells me they don't want me to die. This hurts too much for me to ignore. Thank you for telling your story!

Every time you want a cigarette, give them a hug. You'll all benefit :)

Carole
 
Joined
Jan 17, 2006
Messages
7,892
Location
East TN
Buddy, having quit for 9 months you have to know what it smells like to those around you that don't smoke. Is there an omen there, you quit for 9 months, and I Quit for 9 years. Wouldn't you rather be me on this thing? If I am behind someone in line at the store, and they are a smoker, it's so nausiating. It does not smell good to me at all. I am thankful that today, non-smoker rules are in place a lot of places where they once weren't. The convenience market where everyone smoked inside, now it's against state law. I actually smiled when I heard that was happening. So great for the non smoker. I actually had something to do with new regulations at work. I think, having pushed for ash trays to be removed from the front of buildings, and smoking prohibited at the entrances. Eventually, that came to be. There's a 25 foot rule now. It's not perfect, but it's better than what we had. If I had my way, it would be 25 miles. lol.

I had to completely disinfect my house when I quit, it was not an easy task. Carpets, painting walls, I washed every item of clothing in my closet. IT was no small task to get that oder out of my life. Occasionally, I will open something up from old, and get a whiff of that old disgusting stale smoke oder, and peee-uuuu.

Buddy, do it for yourself. Give yourself a chance at life man! Life is worth it. I know that quiting didn't give me a guarantee of good health. but it certainly increased my odds of living a healthier life. That's what I wanted. I feel like for the most part, that is what I got. I'm 56 today, and not in great shape, but where would I be if I hadn't quit when I was 47? My only regret is not doing it soooo much sooner. But I can't look back and get that time back, I can only control from today forward. That's what you can do too. Goodluck!
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2006
Messages
12,798
Location
Ashburton , New Zealand
I've read the statement "Quitting smoking is easy, I've done it hundreds of times!" :smile:
A while ago I met someone I had worked with before who had just come back from an overseas holiday. He had sat down one day and worked out how much smoking was costing him over a year. He quit right away and saved his smoking money for a year and used it for an overseas trip.
But of course regardless of the financial costs even if it was free your health is worth a lot more. I'd bet that if smoking had only been invented today it would immediately be banned. It's a drug, if you can't give it up you're an addict, think of it like that and ask yourself if that's what you want to be. It may sound harsh but that's the truth of it.
 

Latest threads

Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Nikon Cafe is a fan site and not associated with Nikon Corporation.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Forum GIFs powered by GIPHY: https://giphy.com/
Copyright © Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom