distance in meters, not feet

Discussion in 'General flash photography, lighting, and technique' started by artoris, Aug 17, 2008.

  1. artoris

    artoris

    10
    May 25, 2007
    Atlanta, GA
    I bought a used SB 26 on eBay and instead of having the distance in feet, it has it in meters.

    Does anybody know how to change this to feet?

    Thanks.
     
  2. One meter equals 3.28 feet or, roughly, 3 feet 3 inches. Check your cell phone calculator for a converter; that's where I did the conversion above.
     
  3. Chris101

    Chris101

    Feb 2, 2005
    Arizona
    Or use Google to convert. Type: 2.5 meters in feet

    And Google will return: 2.5 meters = 8.20209974 feet

    Using Google, you can convert just about anything to anything else.
     
  4. artoris

    artoris

    10
    May 25, 2007
    Atlanta, GA
    Thanks, I already know how to convert meters to feet. I just want the distance to read out in feet. And why is it in meters in the first place?
     
  5. That's the international standard.

    Ronnie
     
  6. I think the US is one of the few countries left in the world still using feet and inches. Does anyone know how to convert the US to metres?
     
  7. Try Google :rolleyes: :biggrin:

    OK, only kidding.
     
  8. Chris101

    Chris101

    Feb 2, 2005
    Arizona
    Type: US in metric
     
  9. ddrg

    ddrg

    27
    Jul 3, 2006
    The meter / feet switch is in the battery compartment.
     
  10. I just downloaded the manual for the SB26 and can send the PDF file to you if you want it. There is a setup section in the manual that might cover your problem.

    All the illustrations in the manual show both feet and meters in the display. But that may be just for the manual.

    If you want the file, send me a note at <[email protected]>. This file is 4MB + so be prepared for a large file. You can print it also if you need to.

    Max
     
  11. A second thought on your problem. Go to the Nikon web site and ask your question on the site. I normally get an answer from a real live person within a day.

    Go to <www.nikonusa.com>. Click on support and do a search with your question.

    Max
     
  12. ddrg

    ddrg

    27
    Jul 3, 2006
    As I posted previously, the switch which controls meter / feet display is in the battery compartment, just inside the top left edge. I confirmed this by looking at my old SB-26.
     
  13. artoris

    artoris

    10
    May 25, 2007
    Atlanta, GA
    Thanks ddrg. It's a tiny little white switch inside the battery compartment. I took me a while to find, but I did, and now I have the scale in feet.

    It's funny. I looked everywhere in the manual and couldn't find anythng.

    Thanks again.
     
  14. ddrg

    ddrg

    27
    Jul 3, 2006
    Yeah - its not really obvious. Check out picture 2 on page 21.

    Ciao... Duncan
     
  15. tjk60

    tjk60

    Dec 4, 2007
    troy, mi
    Sure, have everyone else convert to feet. We HAVE to be different :biggrin:
     
  16. Except for the U.S. military - which uses the metric system - at least some of the time
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 29, 2008
  17. demosaic

    demosaic Guest

    Horses for courses.

    U.S. medicine, science and most industry has used SI units for a long time. Consumers and building trades generally use feet and inches. Big deal; we're talking about TWO systems, not TWENTY. It's hardly The Tower of Babble. People use what works for them.

    Sometimes that means a truly unusual unit, like the "acre-foot" used to express the volume of water in reservoirs. It's useful to managers of reservoirs because they can quickly calculate water area and depth. Who am I to say they should use liters instead? What do I care?

    Another example: with literally hundreds of millions of buildings made out of 4' x 8' sheets of plywood (and other materials, all measured in even numbers of inches), it would be pointless for the construction industry to switch to metric for purely philosophical reasons.

    And forget stories about crashing Mars probes; people still screw up units even when working in an entirely metric environment. Case in point: the 1000x overdose of blood thinners administered to Dennis Quaid's kids. They mixed up milliliters and liters.

    We can continue using both systems indefinitely. It's really a non-problem.

    P.S. Go take a look at the tires on your car. Even in New Zealand, the rim diameter is in all likelihood measured in inches. And check out the units on the altimeter the next time you go for a flight!
     

  18. :) - I grew up on feet and inches, we converted to SI in the late 60's but it has taken a long time to fully convert. Our plywood is 1.2 * 2.4. Our 100*50 timbers are still called 4*2 by some. We talk about a quarter acre section (1000m2). We still enjoy a pint of beer. Water flow went from cusecs to cumecs. My original comment was very much tongue in cheek. Oh, and we have tyres on our vehicles, not tires.
     
  19. adrianaitken

    adrianaitken Guest

    demosaic - one big deal is speedo on your vehicle. 2 years ago I brought a European scooter and the main speed gauge was km/h with a little mph writen around it. I would drive for ages wondering why all the cars would overtake me in a 30 mph zone with me doing 30. You guessed it, I was doing 30 km/h, about 20mph. Doh !!! I've since changed the dial to have mph the main numbers, and yes, it now seems I go faster :smile: