Does anyone use Blubox?

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http://www.blubox.com

Blubox is a powerful and easy-to-use photo compressor which allows you to share and store photos more easily.

Blubox uses advanced image compression algorithms to compress your photos by up to 90%, while retaining the original resolution and quality for printing and viewing - similar to zipping but with specialized support for image formats like JPEG and TIFF.

Anyone tried it?
 

Growltiger

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Would I trust the backup of my photos to a lossy proprietary algorithm where the only way to ever view the photos again is by using their software? No.

Disks are very cheap, this might perhaps have made sense 15 years ago.
 
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They say it's not lossy though : "while retaining the original resolution".

But yeah, probably more hassle than it's worth. I worry about running out of disc space loonnngg before I ever do!
 
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Would I trust the backup of my photos to a lossy proprietary algorithm where the only way to ever view the photos again is by using their software? No.

Disks are very cheap, this might perhaps have made sense 15 years ago.

Agreed. Just because they say it's not lossy doesn't mean it's true! This software might be fine for folks with point n shoots but why spend good money for good gear only to do this to your images? Spend a bit more on storage.
 
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Agreed. Just because they say it's not lossy doesn't mean it's true!

Lossless and lossy are distinctively defined mathematical terms used in information theory, dating back 80 years: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_Shannon

Whether an algorithm is lossy or lossless is easy to verify in a matter of seconds. Some companies use obfuscating tactics describing an algorithm as "visually lossless", Nikon for example, when the algorithm is lossy. This has lead some innocent people to think the compression is lossless.

I still wouldn't use Bluebox for anything.
 

Growltiger

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They say it's not lossy though : "while retaining the original resolution".

But yeah, probably more hassle than it's worth. I worry about running out of disc space loonnngg before I ever do!

No, they say it is lossy for images if you look at the features page. The Setting dialog shows it and their explanation covers it.

Anyway I think we are all agreed it isn't a good idea.
 
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Lossless and lossy are distinctively defined mathematical terms used in information theory, dating back 80 years: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_Shannon

Whether an algorithm is lossy or lossless is easy to verify in a matter of seconds. Some companies use obfuscating tactics describing an algorithm as "visually lossless", Nikon for example, when the algorithm is lossy. This has lead some innocent people to think the compression is lossless.

I still wouldn't use Bluebox for anything.

Don't Wikipedia either...not reliable. Last year my English professor told the class anyone who sources Wikipedia will get an automatic "F".

But I'm sure more than 50% of everything there is still reliable.

Ok i don't Bluebox...
 
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My reference into Wikipedia was to Claude Shannon, the father of information theory. Do you think that the article about this person is flawed in some way?

His texts are in use in universities all over the world where communications, information technology, signal theory or information theory is taught. They happen to lay the foundation to data compression algorithms, too.
 
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My reference into Wikipedia was to Claude Shannon, the father of information theory. Do you think that the article about this person is flawed in some way?

His texts are in use in universities all over the world where communications, information technology, signal theory or information theory is taught. They happen to lay the foundation to data compression algorithms, too.

No not saying that at all. Just watch content in Wikipedia. I see a lot of people source Wikipedia...just saying be careful. I have no idea who Claude is...so I cannot say factually if what is in that content is correct or incorrect.
 

Growltiger

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It is an excellent article. You won't easily find such well presented information about it elsewhere.

One of the tests you can apply to Wikipedia articles is to go to the Reference section. Good articles quote good references. You might like to explain it to that English professor - it might reduce his prejudice!
 
Joined
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San Jose, CA
I wouldn't trust any critical data (photos included) on any company's servers. Servers crash & data gets lost, it's part of technological life. If I'm going to lose data, I want it to happen on my disk drives, not elsewhere. Hence, why my data gets backed on 2 drives.
 

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