Dogz got to go

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Every year there dogs dump 11 million tons of feces in USA and Canada.. :eek:




Dog waste is an environmental pollutant. In 1991, it was labeled a non-point source pollutant by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), placing it in the same category as herbicides and insecticides; oil, grease and toxic chemicals; and acid drainage from abandoned mines.

Far from Fertilizer
Woof-woof waste does not a good fertilizer make. It is actually toxic to your lawn, causing burns and unsightly discoloring.

Beyond your grass, it has been estimated that a single gram of dog waste can contain 23 million fecal coliform bacteria, which are known to cause cramps, diarrhea, intestinal illness, and serious kidney disorders in humans. EPA even estimates that two or three days’ worth of droppings from a population of about 100 dogs would contribute enough bacteria to temporarily close a bay, and all watershed areas within 20 miles of it, to swimming and shell fishing.





Gregory
 

Butlerkid

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Sorry....every species "poops".

Are you a 100% vegan?

Shall we get rid of humans we deem of marginal value to society?

Better to solve perceived problems, rather than killing the "problem".
 
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Every year there dogs dump 11 million tons of feces in USA and Canada.. :eek:




Dog waste is an environmental pollutant. In 1991, it was labeled a non-point source pollutant by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), placing it in the same category as herbicides and insecticides; oil, grease and toxic chemicals; and acid drainage from abandoned mines.

Far from Fertilizer
Woof-woof waste does not a good fertilizer make. It is actually toxic to your lawn, causing burns and unsightly discoloring.

Beyond your grass, it has been estimated that a single gram of dog waste can contain 23 million fecal coliform bacteria, which are known to cause cramps, diarrhea, intestinal illness, and serious kidney disorders in humans. EPA even estimates that two or three days’ worth of droppings from a population of about 100 dogs would contribute enough bacteria to temporarily close a bay, and all watershed areas within 20 miles of it, to swimming and shell fishing.





Gregory
Speaking from 40 years of experience, NOT!
 
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  • #5
Thanks for the comments..

Look I am huge dog lover.. Always have been...So I dont want anyone to think that my post is an attack on dogs.. Love dogs..


I heard something on the radio the other day about the "issue" of dog poop to are health. And thought this photo might serve to get a disccusion going and raise awareness.

And on a peronal note. I was helping someone move the other day and the former owners had a huge dog.. And they left a winter's worth of crap in there back yard..
Not sure of the breed but it must have been a huge breed. OMG..:tongue:
And after seeing that.. It really started me thinking .


And collectivly with all the dogs around , clearly the volume of wasit is significant.


Listening to the radio the other day.. I know of one condo board that has taken the time to DNA all the dogs in the buliding and if they find dog wasit, they take a sample, test it and fine the owner..

The first fine is $150 the second is $500 and up and up it goes.. :eek:

Apparently since implimenting this program the amount of dog waste on the property is close to zero..



Now there is also the issue of throwing this type of waist into the land fills and what not..
One might make a point that is that really the best place for it.. ?

You would think that with all the technology at are disposal.. we would treat it like we do with the human waist.

And transform it into some form of energy..


" **** dosnt just happen it collects"


Gregory
 
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I am not an Expert on Poop by any means but from the short research I've done, it appears that Greg's assessment is correct for the most part. I have 2 dogs & I always bring a plastic bag when we go for walks however we have a fenced in yard that the dogs use for their bathroom endeavors & I don't always get to every "piece" when picking up wast! The grass appears to be effected.
More importantly, Greg Loves Dog's & just about every other living creature on the planet! I think the message was misinterpreted IMHO.
Interesting topic & discussion though! :)
 
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Thanks Steve.. you got my back Brother..:smile:


It's funny back in the day.. You used to see dog waste everywhere.. Now like Steve mentiond, most folks pick it up after there doggy pals .

However, it still ends up in the land fills.. and the plastic bags and gloves ( see my other post Pooper scooper glove) are also part of the waste chain..


Where I used to live in Airdrie, there was a little grass court yard where my son and I used to throw the football.

It always bothered me that people wouldnt bother to pick up there dogs waste.. So we would take a few mintues and with the help of the gloves /bags at the dumpsters . We would clean the dog waste up..

And than go back upstairs to wash are hands.. :smile:

And since I would often pet the dogs around my building I never minded helping out..


What is somewhat alarming now is the serious heath issues that can be transmitted through coming in contact with Dog waste..

DANGEROUS DOG POOP?

Author: Wiki Pets

Cleaning up after your dog can be a stinky job, but someone's gotta
do it.. Constant clean up is necessary for a healthy environment
for you and your family.

IS DOG POOP DANGEROUS??

Love, food, and shelter were all things you actively agreed to
providing for your new pet when you purchased or adopted them.
Sanitation and cleanup are also important facets of pet ownership
that are critical to the health and well-being of your entire
family.

Dog feces is as high as 3rd on the list of contributors to
contaminated water. Cleaning up after your dog is one guarantee in
the life of every pet owner. Left un-checked, your yard can quickly
turn into a mine field of feces in a week or less. On average, dogs
do a number two twice per day which adds up to about 14 piles of
poo in just one week, per dog. Contrary to popular belief, dog
feces is not fertilizer and does not provide any benefit to the
soil.

SO WHATS IN IT?

Dog feces may contain parvovirus, whipworms, hookworms, roundworms,
threadworms, campylobacteriosis, giardia, and coccidia. If left
unattended, these parasites will contaminate the water, soil, and
can even cause infection in both pets and humans (especially
children). The microscopic Hookworm larvae can be passed to another
pet or person directly through the skin or by accidental ingestion
as can other bacteria.

WHICH PARASITES CAN HUMANS ACQUIRE?

Yes, humans are capable of contracting hookworms, tapeworms,
threadworms and campylobacteriosis. This is the most significant
reason to avoid allowing dogs (especially puppies) to like your
face and mouth - affectionately known as "puppy kisses". If a dog
has recently eaten feces or attempted to groom their hind quarters
and come into contact with this infectious material, there is a
chance the parasites will be passed directly into your mouth.
Children are especially venerable to infection because they tend to
enjoy playing in the dirt, where parasites such as hookworm larvae
lay dormant waiting for a new host. Young children may also put
dirty hands or toys in their mouth, further increasing the chance
for infectious material consumption.

DISEASE PREVENTION

Pet feces can be catastrophic to the local water table,
contaminating nearby ponds, lakes, rivers and drinking water. When
feces is allowed to remain on the soil for long periods, rainstorms
will begin to dilute and break apart the feces and slowly spread
the bacteria on other contaminants into local water sources. If
your yard happens to hold water for extended periods of time, the
problem may be amplified.

To avoid potential infection, dog feces should be removed from the
yard every 1 - 7 days, depending on the size of the dog and number
of dogs in the household. Larger dogs will need more frequent
cleanup, as will households with more than 1 dog. A family with one
Pomeranian will have a much lower environmental impact than the
family with 2 Great Danes.

If you are too busy to clean up after your dog, or the thought of
it just makes you gag, there are many services available today,
such as Pet Butler, that will gladly do the dirty work for you. A
sanitation expert will locate and remove any feces found on
premises 1 or more times per week usually from around $10.00. Some
areas do have legal statutes that regulate the cleanup and disposal
of pet waste, so be sure to contact your local health board for
more information.



Germs from dog feces linger over Detroit sky, study says

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August 20, 2011 12:00 am(1) Comment
DETROIT - Move over, smog. When it comes to stuff in the air over Detroit, a team of researchers has found that in winter, it's bacteria from dog poop that hovers over the city.

A team of researchers studied 100 air samples collected in four Midwestern cities, including Detroit, looking for bacteria, and found that the most dominant type in winter is the same one found in canine feces.

Cleveland also had high counts of doggy-doo bacteria; Chicago had less and tiny Mayville, Wis., surrounded by cornfields, had little.

What does it mean? Maybe not much. The researchers said that although the idea of airborne fecal bacteria sounds icky, it's possible that metropolitan areas across America all have it and there may be no health effects at all.

"What it really says is how little we know about the bacteria we breathe in every day," said Noah Fierer, an ecology professor at the University of Colorado and one of the authors of the study.

Detroit just happened to be one of the first places studied for aerial bacteria because air sampling data for it and the three other cities were already available, Fierer said.

"It may be that this is just as common in other cities like New York or San Francisco, we just don't know," he said. They hope to study more cities and map the airborne bacteria across the continent.

Rob Knight, also a professor at the university, said the scientists didn't know the health effects of the fecal bacteria on humans.

It's not necessarily that Detroit has more dogs than other places. Nationwide, the average dog population is 37 percent of the human population, or about one dog for every three people. In Detroit, that would mean about 265,000 dogs.

Fierer said researchers have known for centuries that bacteria are everywhere, including in the air. But airborne bacteria have rarely been studied. Yet it's well known that they can cause allergenic asthma and seasonal allergies, which are increasingly prevalent in developed countries, the researchers said.

The study was published July 29 in Applied and Environmental Biology.





Gregory
 
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