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Featured Critique Dramatic Cut Glass

Discussion in 'Black and White' started by Mike Buckley, Sep 24, 2018.

  1. This vase cost me a whopping $2 at a yard sale a couple days ago. At least for now, the first photo is one of my favorite photos of the more than 400 I've made of transparent glass.

    Photo #1 Setup
    The background, which is translucent white plexiglass, filled the frame no more and no less. A medium continuous-light lamp behind it was shining toward the subject and camera. That setup outlined the transparent glass in dark tones.

    Photo #2 Setup
    The background, which is black velvet, filled the frame no more and no less. (A background made of any color including white would have produced the same results.) A larger sheet of diffusion material was immediately behind it and a medium continuous-light lamp behind both of them was shining toward the subject and camera. That setup outlined the transparent glass in bright tones.


    Mike 2018-09-24--005-S.
    NIKON D7000    35-35 mm F2.0-F2.0    35mm    f/22.0    1/1s    ISO 100




    Mike 2018-09-25--001-S.
    NIKON D7000    35.0 mm f/2.0    35mm    f/22.0    5s    ISO 100
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2018
    • Winner Winner x 1
  2. WOW! Elegantly lit and that detail is amazing---so much for defraction at f22!
     
  3. Thanks, Nick!

    By the way, f/22 is the smallest aperture on this lens.

    I've always believed that the concern for diffraction is highly overrated. All details (whether good or bad) are minimized when displaying such small files on the Internet. The photographer needs to determine the issues that are important relative to the size the image is going to be displayed. I'm never going to produce a 20" x 30" print of this image, so whatever diffraction exists won't be apparent. Moreover in this particular example, the imperfections of the subject's glass, the dirt on the inside of the vase that can't be removed, and the large amount of refracted light displayed in this subject result in an image when if diffraction is never to be a concern, this would be that type of image.

    As another example, you probably wouldn't know from the file displayed here that the rear of the vase is not sharply in focus despite the f/22 aperture that was used. Yet if you examined it as I did at 100%, I knew at the time I captured the subject that it's rear wasn't sharply in focus. That was confirmed when I viewed it afterward at 100% on my computer.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2018
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. The effect on the glass is stunning! I have an image of you photographing museum pieces.
     
  5. Bart

    Bart

    Sep 20, 2009
    An exceptional image, Mike!
    Beautifully captured patterns.
    Your application of lighting is second to none!
     
  6. I added a second photo using the opposite lighting scheme.
     
  7. Thanks, Bart! You might have posted before I added the second image, as we were doing stuff at the same time.
     
  8. Bart

    Bart

    Sep 20, 2009
    Indeed, Mike.
    If I were to chose one, I'd pick the first one :) 

    Reason - if you can put such things to words - is the patterns that show up in the translucent middle part.
     
  9. Thanks for nominating the first image for the home page, Bart! Sorry that posting the second image when you were viewing only the first one caused confusion.

    I also prefer the first image. My way of putting it is that when a monochrome image is made of transparent glass, I usually prefer the bright background and outlines in dark tones because there seem to be more of the middle grey tones. In this particular case, I also prefer the graduated tones in the bright background that don't exist in the dark background.
     
  10. I just now realized that half of the photos being displayed on the home page are monochromes. Very good for all enthusiasts of that genre!
     
  11. Bart

    Bart

    Sep 20, 2009
    You are better with words than I am :) 
     
  12. My wife prefers the version with the dark background. She's right. If you don't understand why I mention that she's right without an explanation as to why, you've never been married. :ROFLMAO: 
     
  13. That struck me too! (y)(y)(y)
     
  14. Both images are nice. Interesting shape and great lighting. I prefer the first one as it displays more texture in the glass to my eye.

    Glenn
     
  15. I like them both but I would prefer #1 if I had to choose Mike. I think the grey BG makes the details more noticeable on the glass.
     
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